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401 Zoning classification?

Discussion in 'Michigan' started by redfish, Mar 27, 2008.

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  1. redfish

    redfish Senior Member

    49
    Sep 2, 2007
    Professional Status:
    Certified Residential Appraiser
    State:
    Michigan
    I want to know what mentor trained newbies to use the 401 land use code for zoning classification. I thought it was just a few misguided, poorly trained appraisers, but I am seeing this more and more on reviews.
     
  2. Doug Trites

    Doug Trites Junior Member

    0
    Oct 17, 2007
    Professional Status:
    Certified Residential Appraiser
    State:
    Michigan
    That is the same thing I have been seeing. I think it is lack of training and some people being lazy. They look at the property card and stop when they see the 401 and enter that data. It should read as an example R1B then in the next area Single Family Res or whatever it is.
     
  3. Kali the Boston Terrier

    Kali the Boston Terrier Senior Member

    2
    Jul 7, 2003
    Professional Status:
    Certified General Appraiser
    State:
    Michigan
    Actually its the land use code off of Realcomp PRD, they did not even go to the City, let alone pull the field card. Newer appraisers are getting lazier and lazier. Funny part is that 90% of the lots in SE Michigan are non-conforming, yet nobody ever reads the zoning code around here...its my favorite thing to cite in my reviews.
     
  4. redfish

    redfish Senior Member

    49
    Sep 2, 2007
    Professional Status:
    Certified Residential Appraiser
    State:
    Michigan
    Detroit (City) is just one big nonconformity. I get them everytime on reviews there.
     
  5. Kali the Boston Terrier

    Kali the Boston Terrier Senior Member

    2
    Jul 7, 2003
    Professional Status:
    Certified General Appraiser
    State:
    Michigan
    Do you get them on frontage or total size? I prefer both...but then again I don't think anyone up above cares, just something fun to do.
     
  6. hglenbetts

    hglenbetts Senior Member

    2
    Dec 3, 2007
    Professional Status:
    Certified Residential Appraiser
    State:
    Michigan
    Brian,

    I think 90% is a bit of an exaggeration, :icon_eyecrazy: but when you do have a Legal-non-conforming, residential, do you include the zoning language about the ability to rebuild if damaged/destroyed?? I've gotten this request a couple times. Some of the code enforcement people have no idea what I'm talking about.:shrug:
     
  7. Doug Trites

    Doug Trites Junior Member

    0
    Oct 17, 2007
    Professional Status:
    Certified Residential Appraiser
    State:
    Michigan
    That should always be done in the report. I would not send a report out that was legal non conforming with out putting the abaility to rebuild in the event of some type of destruction of the property.
     
  8. Kali the Boston Terrier

    Kali the Boston Terrier Senior Member

    2
    Jul 7, 2003
    Professional Status:
    Certified General Appraiser
    State:
    Michigan
    I quote specifically from the zoning ordinance...rebuild percentage, number of months vacant, etc.

    90% is not even close to exaggeration, in the last 5 years I have marked conforming less than 10% of the time...and I do a considerable volume all over SE Michigan. In fact Detroit for R-1 Single Family requires a frontage of 50' and 5,000 SF lot to build. Nearly the entire City is 40 x 120 lots...that same story plays out in almost all of SE Michigan. But if you are not reading the zoning ordinance every report...you might not know that.
     
  9. Alexandra Kanakis

    Alexandra Kanakis Sophomore Member

    0
    Jan 15, 2002
    Professional Status:
    Certified Residential Appraiser
    State:
    Michigan
    I sat on the Detroit Board of Zoning Appeals for 3 years and helped write the new zoning book. That said, let me be clear that I DO NOT agree with some of the changes to matter of right in some zones. I also have very strong opinions about the power that was given to BS&E. But then again I also have strong opinions about some of the decisions from the Board regarding zoning variances and the ability for some members to interpret zoning ordiances according to what favor they are being given.
    Anyways, somewhere in this forum I thought I read that someone wanted the old zoning book. I have one but due to all the amendments over the 20+ years it existed I may not have all the extra sheets.
    Like many of you, I too insert zoning specs in some of my reports. I also have reported in reviews if stated zoning is incorrect, or any of the easier facts that can be validated just through a little searching. Detroit can be tough but once you know how and where to look then you need to look. A lot of time is spent on verifying data on subject & comps. But once that report is done, I know everything in there is as correct as can be.
    Appraising an older urban area, especially Detroit with all it's nuances, is not for the lazy, form filler or faint of heart. If you do it and do it right, you will learn a lot about appraising. Almost every report is a challenge especially in these times.
    When we were writing the new ordinance book, I brought to the table some zoning that can be found in surrounding communities. The head planners who were all from out of state looked at me like I was nuts. Detroit has some very unique communities that have their own preferences and accepted land use. It is part of which makes older urban areas interesting and not bland. 30' lots are the norm lots of places and to insist that new construction have 50' minimum was out of line especially when one of the city
    planning goals was to have new construction or in-fill housing match as much as possible the existing structures and land use.
    There's lots of stories about the new zoning book and the best advise I can give anyone is to read it, accept it and don't try to analyze it. It is what it is. It's Detroit.
     
  10. Kali the Boston Terrier

    Kali the Boston Terrier Senior Member

    2
    Jul 7, 2003
    Professional Status:
    Certified General Appraiser
    State:
    Michigan
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