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Approved FHA heat source?

Discussion in 'FHA/HUD and VA' started by pgerarde, Nov 18, 2008.

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  1. pgerarde

    pgerarde Junior Member

    0
    Mar 5, 2002
    Professional Status:
    Certified Residential Appraiser
    State:
    Arizona
    I just went back to a home that was missing a conventional heat source when I was on the site. (This is for a FHA loan.)

    I was informed that they would put in a central system so the appraisal was "Subject to" this work being done.

    Went back out today. Central system has been changed to a baseboard heater. This heater had a plug on it when I was there previously and informed them that it was not considered a conventional heat source.

    They took a plugin outlet (dedicated to 1 breaker in fuse box) and "hardwired"!? the plugin baseboard into it. (They removed the plug on the cord and wired into outlet.) The cord runs along the top/outside of the baseboard with a cord channel placed over it. This channel runs up into the box they install in the outlet area.

    There is about a 2 inch area of exposed plugin wire between the unit and the channel that covers the wire along the top of the floor molding.

    I have attached a jpeg of this installation.

    My question...does this meet FHA requirements? It is on a dicated breaker and has "hardwired" somewhat. I have never seen this type of installation for a baseboard in this area. (Home is only 560 square feet.) It is not typical for the area...

    Thanks for your help,
    Patti in Chino Valley, AZ
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Highlander416

    Highlander416 Member

    19
    Feb 16, 2003
    Professional Status:
    Certified Residential Appraiser
    State:
    Massachusetts
    I would say no. Based on the picture, the baseboard heater does not appear permanently affixed to anything. Just sitting on the floor, is this correct? Seems like a safety issue to me. Is this baseboard heater large enough to support the living area, or just for smaller space?
     
  3. pgerarde

    pgerarde Junior Member

    0
    Mar 5, 2002
    Professional Status:
    Certified Residential Appraiser
    State:
    Arizona
    No, it is not attached/affixed to wall. I actually moved it away from wall to take the photos.

    Yes, a baseboard unit would work as the area is only 560 square feet. (We also do not get much snow/freezing in this area.

    Thanks for your help.

    God bless,
    Patti in Chino Valley, AZ
     
  4. Riick

    Riick Elite Member

    49
    Aug 14, 2007
    Professional Status:
    Certified Residential Appraiser
    State:
    Delaware
    Such a heater needs to be "permanently affixed" to the property.
    EG - screwed or bolted to wall or floor with the intention that it becomes part of the property, unlike personal property that is (mostly) highly portable.
     
  5. Rrebera

    Rrebera Junior Member

    0
    Jan 21, 2002
    Professional Status:
    Certified Residential Appraiser
    State:
    Ohio
    it is leagl to place an electric heater on the floor, but many codes require a seperate circuit for them. A rule of thumb in figuring the correct wattage is one watt per cubic foot. This will tell you if the heater can heat the room. It is not legal to place an electric heater under an outlet. You can also use 10 watts per square foot There should also be a seperate thermostat for the heater. You should also check and see if they installed then in series or parallel.....series is a no, no.....
     
  6. Tim Hicks (Texas)

    Tim Hicks (Texas) Elite Member
    Gold Supporting Member

    72
    Jan 15, 2002
    Professional Status:
    Certified Residential Appraiser
    State:
    Texas
    Oh yeah, what about all those FHA home sales with Dearborn gas space heaters? They are generally stored during the warm months. If it is typical for the market, is sufficient to heat the entire living area and it is in place, then it is a valid heat source according to HUD. Heck they have window unit heaters now, too.
     
  7. pgerarde

    pgerarde Junior Member

    0
    Mar 5, 2002
    Professional Status:
    Certified Residential Appraiser
    State:
    Arizona
    Guys, there is NO separate thermostat. There is only a knob you turn on the heater itself.

    Now that I think about it...all the baseboard and wall units I've ever done do have a thermostat. If that is typically for the area, does that mean it is not FHA compliant.?

    Thanks for the help.

    God bless,
    Patti in Chino Valley, AZ
     
  8. Mr Rex

    Mr Rex Elite Member

    246
    Jan 12, 2004
    Professional Status:
    Certified Residential Appraiser
    State:
    North Carolina
    You got all of that out of 4150.2 and the revised Appendix D? I got to get some reading glasses.:Eyecrazy:
     
  9. Rrebera

    Rrebera Junior Member

    0
    Jan 21, 2002
    Professional Status:
    Certified Residential Appraiser
    State:
    Ohio
    4150 what

    code is bible not 4150
     
  10. Rrebera

    Rrebera Junior Member

    0
    Jan 21, 2002
    Professional Status:
    Certified Residential Appraiser
    State:
    Ohio
    has to meet local codes first

    check with your local code official and they will tell you if it is compliant.....some areas require it and some don't.....
     
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