Asbestos siding

Discussion in 'FHA/HUD and VA' started by BrianS, Apr 29, 2011.

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  1. BrianS

    BrianS Sophomore Member

    0
    Jul 1, 2009
    Professional Status:
    Certified Residential Appraiser
    State:
    Missouri
    This week I did a home for a USDA loan that had asbestos siding. The Realtor said that an inspector from USDA had been there and "accepted" the house as long as an appraiser did a thorough inspection for repairs. I called the local USDA office and asked them about the asbestos siding and they said it would go as long as none of the shingles are broken or in bad condition which they were not.
    If everything you read or hear about asbestos is true I personally would not want to live in a home with that type of exterior.
    I am now wondering if FHA requirements are the same? I know alot of FHA and USDA requirements are the same however some are different as I have learned the past few years. I would like to know in case I ever get a house like that for an FHA loan.
     
  2. Mr Rex

    Mr Rex Elite Member

    14
    Jan 12, 2004
    Professional Status:
    Certified Residential Appraiser
    State:
    North Carolina
    Asbestos siding was some of the best siding ever made. There are no health concerns unless the siding is broken, chipping etc that would allow the fibers to be come airborne.
     
  3. Calvin the Airedale

    Calvin the Airedale Elite Member
    Supporting Member

    0
    Aug 17, 2004
    Professional Status:
    Certified General Appraiser
    State:
    Ohio
    Asbestos shingles were the first "aluminum siding" of the modern housing age. Together with asphalt "insul-brick siding, they were the original alternatives to painting every few years. If they remain unbroken or unfrayed, they should be no problem to for FHA.
     
  4. CANative

    CANative Elite Member

    25
    Jun 18, 2003
    Professional Status:
    Certified Residential Appraiser
    State:
    California
    The key word is "friable." Google this word and you will understand the issues.
     
  5. BrianS

    BrianS Sophomore Member

    0
    Jul 1, 2009
    Professional Status:
    Certified Residential Appraiser
    State:
    Missouri
    Thanks for the answers ;)
     
  6. RSW

    RSW Elite Member

    3
    Feb 18, 2002
    Professional Status:
    Certified Residential Appraiser
    State:
    Tennessee
    Asbestos siding is not an issue unless it is friable or unless it has been removed. You can leave it as it is and it will be ok or you can cover it up with siding. Just don't remove it. Then it becomes a hazardous material.
     
  7. Don Clark

    Don Clark Elite Member

    1
    Jan 17, 2002
    Professional Status:
    Certified Residential Appraiser
    State:
    Virginia
    Probably about 70% of all residential property in the USA has or has had asbestos siding. Much of it is now covered up with aluminum or vinyl siding but the old stuff is still underneath all that.

    Most problems with ACM (asbestos containing material) occur when the asbestos is removed or one attempts to remove it. Then it becomes friable.
     
  8. roofnron

    roofnron New Member

    0
    Jun 15, 2011
    Professional Status:
    General Public
    State:
    Virginia
    I am a roofing contractor that has done training and worked directly with asbestos removal.

    I agree with Mr. Rex regarding the siding and you can add roofing to that as well.

    I just wanted to add my concerns with the statements regarding covering it up. You see it all the time. Contractors usually start off by nailing a fan-fold insulation board over the asbestos. Then nailing the siding over that. Ending up with asbestos siding that has been disturbed by the process of nailing. Pieces can break off, crack, and or split. You can't pre-drill to prevent breaking as this makes it friable. If you need to remove the siding again in the future you will have a real mess.

    The smart thing here is to leave alone or repair as needed with similar non-asbestos pieces to match. The pieces can be removed without making them friable by cutting of the nail heads with a pair of dikes. The piece will slide off the nails and come out fully intact and undisturbed.

    If the siding needs replaced I would recommend biting the bullet and have it removed and pay for the disposal. I can't say this enough, but I would never recommend covering it up with another nail on siding product.
     
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