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basement/crawlspace

Discussion in 'Urgent - Help Needed' started by John Mancine, Oct 14, 2011.

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  1. John Mancine

    John Mancine Sophomore Member

    0
    Aug 24, 2003
    Professional Status:
    Certified Residential Appraiser
    State:
    New Jersey
    Does anyone know at what point in height does a basement stop being a basement and become just a crawl space? Does ansi address this?
     
  2. Obsolescent

    Obsolescent Senior Member

    9
    Jul 6, 2004
    Professional Status:
    Certified Residential Appraiser
    State:
    Illinois
    As I understand it min. basement height should be about 7'6" finished floor to lowest projection of the ceiling (ex: ductwork) Normal folks should be able to walk without ducking underneath pipes, ductwork.

    In an older home, if its less than the above but higher than a typical crawl, it could be considered a cellar.
     
  3. AnonApprsr

    AnonApprsr Elite Member

    0
    Jan 21, 2008
    Professional Status:
    Certified Residential Appraiser
    State:
    Massachusetts
    Cellar and Basement are the same thing, two words for the space below the first floor as far as I'm, and my market, is concerned. A crawl space is a space where you have to crawl. Perhaps you have a crouch space? I'm almost kidding but really if it's 5 feet I'd call it a Partial Basement, explain what I mean, and move on with my life.
     
  4. Blueprint

    Blueprint Senior Member

    0
    Aug 25, 2005
    Professional Status:
    Certified Residential Appraiser
    State:
    Oregon
    If the height is declining, calculate the basement sf just like you would calculate the acceptable GLA in a sloping finished area which functions as GLA per ANSI standards. The rest is crawlspace. Read the ANSI standards and use them to your advantage. They are here to help you.
     
  5. Blueprint

    Blueprint Senior Member

    0
    Aug 25, 2005
    Professional Status:
    Certified Residential Appraiser
    State:
    Oregon
    If you are a bit insecure with your measurements, so be it. Just make sure you explain your actions in the report to detail so you can easily defend any potential altercations down the road. Just like anything else, it's gets easier with experience.
     
  6. Michigan CG

    Michigan CG Moderator Staff Member Moderator

    93
    Nov 1, 2006
    Professional Status:
    Certified General Appraiser
    State:
    Michigan
    ANSI standards do not address required height for basements because ANSI is only defining above grade square footage.

    No.

    Source?

    The best way to clarify to the reader of the report is to put in a paragraph about the basement/cellar.
     
  7. hglenbetts

    hglenbetts Senior Member

    2
    Dec 3, 2007
    Professional Status:
    Certified Residential Appraiser
    State:
    Michigan
    You've got to be kidding.... That would make most every basement in Michigan, built before the 1990s, a crawl space. Typically, we see the I beem and duct work at 6 feet +/-.
     
  8. Mike Kennedy

    Mike Kennedy Elite Member

    38
    Sep 28, 2003
    Professional Status:
    Certified Residential Appraiser
    State:
    New York
    Adherence to ANSI Standards by a governing municipality is entirely voluntary. Best course of action is to confirm LOCAL building code standards.
     
  9. Couch Potato

    Couch Potato Elite Member

    0
    Mar 15, 2004
    Professional Status:
    Certified Residential Appraiser
    State:
    North Carolina
    IMHO the fundamental difference between the two is basements have floors while crawl spaces have rough surfaces.
     
  10. Mark K

    Mark K Senior Member

    7
    Jan 27, 2004
    Professional Status:
    Certified Residential Appraiser
    State:
    Indiana
    I was in one the other day. 5 1/2' tall to the bottom of the floor joists, 4 1/2' under the furnace ducts. Older house on slab with newer 800 s.f. addition over cellar.

    There was an interior door and stairs down to it, concrete block walls, concrete floor. Owner used it for storage and furnace and water heater were located there, all painted white.

    I called it a cellar and gave it slight additional value, $1,000 I believe, above the comps with crawl spaces. $125K house value range.
     
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