California Licensed For Nevada Work

Discussion in 'General Appraisal Discussion' started by Rene Mata, Nov 28, 2003.

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  1. Rene Mata

    Rene Mata New Member

    0
    Apr 28, 2003
    I just want to ask this question.
    Is a California Licensed Appraiser have rights to use his licensed in Nevada ?
     
  2. Richard Carlsen

    Richard Carlsen Elite Member

    0
    Jan 15, 2002
    Professional Status:
    Licensed Appraiser
    State:
    Michigan
    Not based on California law but only if Nevada specifically allows them. I would suspect it would be like any other state where you have to abide by the laws of the state allowing you to practice there. In addition, you usually have to agree to specific things like not refusing legal service in your home state.

    To find out, you would have to check with the Nevada licensing folks.
     
  3. George Hatch

    George Hatch Elite Member

    17
    Jan 15, 2002
    Professional Status:
    Certified General Appraiser
    State:
    California
    The short answer is that appraisal licenses are not like driver's licenses. They aren't portable and they only apply to work performed in the jurisdictions where the license was issued.

    If you're talking about performing a single assignment in Nevada you can apply for a Temporary Practice Permit. The process varies from state to state, but usually involves filling out a couple forms, paying a small fee and demonstrating to them that you are a licensed appraiser in good standing in your home state.

    If you're talking about doing appraisal work on anything other than a one-time basis, you'll need to obtain a state license in each state you want to do business in. Each state has its own requirements, and they decide whose licenses they will and won't accept. If you look on the OREAs website (you can follow the "Appraisers Links" button above to State Appraisal Boards) they have a page there that deals with "Reciprocity" and a list of states that will accept your California license as proof that you have the minimum level of education and experience to qualify for their license. Again it varies from state to state, but the idea is that you submit your application and pay your fees, they check up on your license status and assuming all goes well they'll issue you a license for their state. When doing business in their state under their license, whether it's a Temporary Practice Permit or a permanent license, you are subject to their rules and their jurisdiction.

    By the way, according to the OREA's list, California does not have reciprocity with Nevada. Kinda sounds like North Carolina and Virginia, doesn't it?
     
  4. Austin

    Austin Elite Member

    0
    Jan 16, 2002
    Professional Status:
    Certified General Appraiser
    State:
    Virginia
    When I was licensed by examination in NC, I live in VA and am general certified, when the reciprocal agreement came into being the NCAB made me either take double CE or change my license to reciprocal. To get the reciprocal license they required me to get a certification from the Virginia Board that cost $25 not counting wasting an hour of my time. Now why couldn’t they have accepted a copy of my VA license or gone on line or looked in a book or picked up the damn telephone or something? This is just another example of barriers these people throw up to keep foreigners out of NC. The last I heard about six weeks ago was that VA and NC had an agreement to reinstate the reciprocal agreement and all that was needed was for the director of the NCAB to issue the papers. I have heard nothing sense. He hasn't gotten around to it yet. Probably to busy with the FBI on mortgage fraud investigations. Funny Virginia doesn't have that problem given their inferior CE, inferior according to the NCAB that is.
    North Carolina shares a 450-mile long border with Virginia but has no reciprocal agreement with Virginia, but CA is 2,500 miles west and they have a reciprocal agreement with CA. That sums up the mentality of the NCAB in a nutshell. Back in the lat 70's when I was in the auction business licensed in NC & VA, the city of Winston-Salem, NC, had a city ordinance that would not allow anyone that did not reside inside the city to conduct an auction inside the city. This shows the pevailing mentality.
     
  5. Oregon Doug

    Oregon Doug Senior Member

    0
    Jan 15, 2002
    Professional Status:
    General Public
    State:
    Oregon
    Austin - and I thought all those state's rights issues had been setteled during the Lincoln administration, but I'd be wrong.

    Orygun Doug
     
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