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Heated Living Area

Discussion in 'Urgent - Help Needed' started by NC Appraising, May 2, 2007.

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  1. NC Appraising

    NC Appraising Senior Member

    0
    Apr 28, 2006
    Professional Status:
    Certified Residential Appraiser
    State:
    North Carolina
    Hope everyone is having a nice Wednesday!!

    Sorry for this elementary question.....

    The owners have enclosed the patio, and the quality of construction is the same as the interior, and is also assessable from the heated living area.

    There are no ducts, just a window unit A/C that has been permanently installed in the wall (cut the wall, not in window). I opened the panel on the unit, and it has both a heat and A/C function. The enclosed patio is around 200 S.q.Ft.

    I really don't know how well these window A/C units put out heat.....

    Anyway, would you count it as heated square footage?

    See photos
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: May 2, 2007
  2. DJBanas

    DJBanas Senior Member

    2
    Aug 26, 2005
    Professional Status:
    Certified Residential Appraiser
    State:
    Pennsylvania
    There are no photos, but...

    I have in the past considered this GLA. The key for me was if the area that you left in order to enter the enclosed patio was basically the same as the patio then I would count it.

    As for the heat, it really depends on your winter temperature range.

    Will counting an extra 200 SF versus just the added value for the amenity really make that much of a difference?
     
  3. Theresa James

    Theresa James Member

    0
    May 8, 2004
    Professional Status:
    Certified Residential Appraiser
    State:
    Florida
    Steven,

    I looked at the photos and based on your description as far as quality of construction goes, I would include the area in my GLA. This type of conversion is very popular in my area & depending on the quality of conversion, I regularly include it. That being said....if you have any qualms about adding it in the GLA, why not carry it elsewhere and give it a separate value?
     
  4. Tater Salad

    Tater Salad Member

    1
    Jan 15, 2002
    Professional Status:
    Certified Residential Appraiser
    State:
    Missouri
    I wouldn't call it GLA because the heater/AC unit plugs into the wall. If it were hardwired, I would. To me, it's unheated area, same as if there were only a spaceheater.


    I would call it a 3-season room. A very nice 3-season room.
     
  5. bblake99

    bblake99 New Member

    0
    Dec 20, 2006
    Professional Status:
    Certified Residential Appraiser
    State:
    Indiana
    The real question is how would the market consider the area? I think as a general answer from how you have described it GLA. The room itself doesnt need to have a heat duct or seperate heat system. In many areas where winter months are relatively mild, you could probably leave the door open or remove the door and provide adequate heat supply to keep the area comfortable year round. If the door was to be removed and appropriatly trimmed, would you consider this to be a deficiency if the homes main heating system were adequate to provide a comfortable room temperature.
     
  6. patti biga

    patti biga New Member

    0
    Oct 22, 2005
    Professional Status:
    Certified Residential Appraiser
    State:
    Ohio
    Based on the photos, it looks like something that I would include in GLA because it has a built-in heat source (thru the wall). I would include photos of the AC/Heating unit.
     
  7. George W Dodd

    George W Dodd Senior Member

    0
    Jul 9, 2002
    Professional Status:
    Certified Residential Appraiser
    State:
    Virginia
    Based on the quality of the finish I would include this area as GLA
     
  8. Doug Wegener

    Doug Wegener Senior Member

    1
    Apr 14, 2005
    Professional Status:
    Certified Residential Appraiser
    State:
    California
    Gla?


    Those are the same kind of units you often see in a Motel 6 (Ok, I admit I have stayed there before) They work well.
     
  9. Doug Wegener

    Doug Wegener Senior Member

    1
    Apr 14, 2005
    Professional Status:
    Certified Residential Appraiser
    State:
    California
    And I would include it in gla. Looks like most of your peers would also.
     
  10. Michigan CG

    Michigan CG Moderator Staff Member Moderator

    87
    Nov 1, 2006
    Professional Status:
    Certified General Appraiser
    State:
    Michigan
    I would also include it, with photos and description. I have appraised apartment buildings with similar heating and cooling.
     
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