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High-voltage electric transmission line

Discussion in 'FHA/HUD and VA' started by Jerry Bone Jr, Nov 21, 2013.

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  1. Jerry Bone Jr

    Jerry Bone Jr Senior Member

    0
    Feb 23, 2004
    Professional Status:
    Licensed Appraiser
    State:
    Oregon
    The pole is 65 feet tall and is located 30 feet from house. The power line is 13kV.
    Any advise?
     

    Attached Files:

  2. CANative

    CANative Elite Member

    61
    Jun 18, 2003
    Professional Status:
    Certified Residential Appraiser
    State:
    California
    http://portalapps.hud.gov/FHAFAQ/controllerServlet?method=showPopup&faqId=1-6KT-2009

    Is a property eligible for FHA if there are overhead or high voltage power lines nearby?

    The appraiser must indicate whether the dwelling or related property improvements is located within the easement serving a high-voltage transmission line, radio/TV transmission tower, cell phone tower, microwave relay dish or tower, or satellite dish (radio, TV cable, etc).

    1) If the dwelling or related property improvement is located within such an easement, the lender must obtain a letter from the owner or operator of the tower indicating that the dwelling and its related property improvements are not located within the tower’s (engineered) fall distance in order to waive this requirement.

    2) If the dwelling and related property improvements are located outside the easement, the property is considered eligible and no further action is necessary. The appraiser, however, is instructed to note and comment on the effect on marketability resulting from the proximity to such site hazards and nuisances.


    Handbook 4150.2, Section 2-2(J)
    http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD...administration/hudclips/handbooks/hsgh/4150.2


    REFERENCE

    Handbook 4150.2, Section 2-2(J)

    REFERRAL LOCATION


    DISCLAIMER

    All policy information contained in this knowledge base article is based upon the referenced HUD policy document. Any lending or insuring decisions should adhere to the specific information contained in that underlying policy document.
     
  3. 444nutman

    444nutman Senior Member

    4
    Jun 20, 2007
    Professional Status:
    Certified Residential Appraiser
    State:
    Florida
    What Mr CANative posted.
    I did a similar power line property for FHA about 3 months ago
    Find similar comps to see if a view adjustment is warranted. I was surprised but based on similar sales in this subdivision, a view adjustment was not warranted. (may differ in your market)
    I spoke to the power company and they told me they are designed to crumple in on themselves. They sent me a letter which I put in the file.
    You can use a pencil at your inspection to see if it is tall enough to fall on the house.
     
  4. realbiz

    realbiz Junior Member

    0
    Mar 14, 2008
    Professional Status:
    Certified General Appraiser
    State:
    California
     
  5. realbiz

    realbiz Junior Member

    0
    Mar 14, 2008
    Professional Status:
    Certified General Appraiser
    State:
    California
    Most that I have done have been collapsible towers, however the one in front of this property is not. OP do not say it will not fall on the property, you have already provided the measurements. If the UW wants to override you, that's fine. But, protect yourself.
     
  6. CANative

    CANative Elite Member

    61
    Jun 18, 2003
    Professional Status:
    Certified Residential Appraiser
    State:
    California
     
  7. Mountain Man

    Mountain Man Elite Member

    12
    Jan 15, 2002
    Professional Status:
    Certified General Appraiser
    State:
    Georgia
    I've never understood why HUD has a problem with towers. What's the difference from an EF 4 tornado hitting the home? Oh wait... the difference is the Gobment will sound the warning sirens after it's "verified" and has passed.
     
  8. stefan olafson

    stefan olafson Senior Member

    0
    Apr 2, 2003
    Professional Status:
    Certified General Appraiser
    State:
    North Dakota
    The pole is 65' in height, what is the distance from the base of the pole to the improvements? No, a wood pole, as this appears to be, won't collapse on itself, what typically happens is they snap off below the cross arms so the full pole would probably never hit the home.

    A 13 kV line is fairly innocuous, I'd check the width of the easement to make sure the entirety of the property is outside the easement area. As far as an effect on value, I'd be surprised if the presence of the poles has any effect at all.
     
  9. RSW

    RSW Elite Member

    17
    Feb 18, 2002
    Professional Status:
    Certified Residential Appraiser
    State:
    Tennessee
    Taken from Handbook 4150.2 section 2-10:

    OVERHEAD HIGH-VOLTAGE TRANSMISSION LINES
    No dwelling or related property improvement may be located
    within the engineering (designed) fall distance of any pole,
    tower or support structure of a high-voltage transmission
    line, radio/TV transmission tower, microwave relay dish or
    tower or satellite dish (radio, TV cable, etc.). For field
    analysis, the appraiser may use tower height as the fall
    distance.
    For the purpose of this Handbook, a High-Voltage Electric
    Transmission Line is a power line that carries high voltage
    between a generating plant and a substation. These lines
    are usually 60 Kilovolts (kV) and greater, and are
    considered hazardous. Lines with capacity of 12-60 kV and
    above are considered high voltage for the purpose of this
    Handbook. High voltage lines do not include local
    distribution and service lines.
    Low voltage power lines are distribution lines that commonly
    supply power to housing developments and similar facilities.
    These lines are usually 12 kV or less and are considered to
    be a minimum hazard. These lines may not pass directly over
    any structure, including pools, on the property being
    insured by HUD.
    > If the property is within the unacceptable distance,
    mark "YES" in VC-1.
     
  10. Peter LeQuire

    Peter LeQuire Elite Member

    38
    Jan 3, 2005
    Professional Status:
    Certified Residential Appraiser
    State:
    Tennessee
     
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