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High Voltage Fall Zone

Discussion in 'FHA/HUD and VA' started by PhiloFarnsworth, Jul 29, 2010.

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  1. PhiloFarnsworth

    PhiloFarnsworth Junior Member

    2
    Nov 2, 2006
    Professional Status:
    Certified Residential Appraiser
    State:
    Pennsylvania
    What is the proper way to determine where the "fall zone" is for a high voltage tower? If all improvements are outside of the right-of-way, is that sufficient for FHA?
     
  2. David Beasley

    David Beasley Senior Member

    1
    Dec 12, 2003
    Professional Status:
    Certified Residential Appraiser
    State:
    North Carolina
    Being outside of the ROW should be good enough, but who knows? That will likely depend on the UW and/or whomever's desk at HUD this case lands on.

    Is there a way to determine the fall distance of such a tower? Yes, become a mechnical engineer. This is one of the many things that us appraisers are asked to sign off on daily that we have absolutely no business signing off on. I disclaim it as such when I run across it. I generally say something like: "Subject improvements appear to be outside of the theoretical fall distance of said high power transmission line tower and per its recorded plat map is outside of the deeded easement for the tower and lines. However, the appraiser is not a mechnical engineer nor is he otherwise an expert in the designed fall distances of man-made towers."
     
  3. NC Appraising

    NC Appraising Senior Member

    0
    Apr 28, 2006
    Professional Status:
    Certified Residential Appraiser
    State:
    North Carolina
    [FONT=Verdana, Geneva, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif]The appraiser must indicate whether the dwelling or related property improvements is located within the easement serving a high-voltage transmission line, radio/TV transmission tower, cell phone tower, microwave relay dish or tower, or satellite dish (radio, TV cable, etc).
    1) If the dwelling or related property improvement is located within such an easement, the DE Underwriter must obtain a letter from the owner or operator of the tower indicating that the dwelling and its related property improvements are not located within the tower’s (engineered) fall distance in order to waive this requirement.

    2)
    If the dwelling and related property improvements are located outside the easement, the property is considered eligible and no further action is necessary. The appraiser, however, is instructed to note and comment on the effect on marketability resulting from the proximity to such site hazards and nuisances.
    http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/ref/sfh1-18f.cfm



    http://www.hud.gov/offices/adm/hudclips/handbooks/hsgh/4150.2/41502appdHSGH.pdf
    Hazards And Nuisances ​
    The appraiser must note and comment on all hazards and nuisances affecting the subject property that may endanger the health and safety of the occupants and/or the structural integrity or marketability of the property, including: subsidence, operating and abandoned oil and gas wells, abandoned wells, slush pits, heavy traffic, airport noise and hazards, runway clear zones/clear zones, proximity to high pressure gas, liquid petroleum pipelines or other volatile and explosive products, residential structures located within the fall distance of a high-voltage transmission line, radio/TV transmission tower, etc., excessive hazard from smoke, fumes, odors, and stationary storage tanks containing flammable or explosive material.
    If hazards or nuisances are observed, the appraiser must describe the condition(s) and make a requirement for repair and/or for further inspection, and prepare the appraisal "subject to repairs" and/or "subject to inspection" in the
    site section of the report. Supporting documentation provided by the appraiser may include extra photos or copies of site studies or analyses, property reports, surveys or plot plans, etc.

    Any and all references to Valuation Condition items addressed in Chapters 2 and 3 are to be addressed in the appropriate section of the applicable appraisal reporting form. For example, Chapter 2, Sec. 2-2-E, Slush Pits, instructs: "If there is any readily observable evidence of slush pits, mark the "yes" column in VC-1". The new protocol will require the appraiser to address this condition in the site section of the appraisal report and note that the property may not be eligible for FHA financing referencing the information contained in chapter 2; otherwise, the guidance provided by chapters 2 and 3 remains in




    http://www.hud.gov/offices/adm/hudclips/handbooks/hsgh/4150.2/41502c2HSGH.pdf
    OVERHEAD HIGH-VOLTAGE TRANSMISSION LINES
    No dwelling or related property improvement may be located
    within the engineering (designed) fall distance of any pole,
    tower or support structure of a high-voltage transmission
    line, radio/TV transmission tower, microwave relay dish or
    tower or satellite dish (radio, TV cable, etc.). For field
    analysis, the appraiser may use tower height as the fall
    distance.
    For the purpose of this Handbook, a High-Voltage Electric
    Transmission Line is a power line that carries high voltage
    between a generating plant and a substation. These lines
    are usually 60 Kilovolts (kV) and greater, and are
    considered hazardous. Lines with capacity of 12-60 kV and
    above are considered high voltage for the purpose of this
    Handbook. High voltage lines do not include local
    distribution and service lines.
    Low voltage power lines are distribution lines that commonly
    supply power to housing developments and similar facilities.
    These lines are usually 12 kV or less and are considered to
    be a minimum hazard. These lines may not pass directly over
    any structure, including pools, on the property being
    insured by HUD. ​
    > If the property is within




    :beer:
    [/FONT]
     
  4. Mr Rex

    Mr Rex Elite Member

    86
    Jan 12, 2004
    Professional Status:
    Certified Residential Appraiser
    State:
    North Carolina
    1234567890
     
    Last edited: Jul 29, 2010
  5. Doug Trites

    Doug Trites Junior Member

    0
    Oct 17, 2007
    Professional Status:
    Certified Residential Appraiser
    State:
    Michigan
    I am working on a report right now that I asked almost the same question on. The tower is only 36' from the detached garage. The tower is on the property for which there must be an easement. I have a call into the power company now and am waiting for a call back. The garage is not or does not appear to be in the easement area. The question is, Since the garage is not within the easement does this than go to number two posted, or does that fact that there is an easement for the tower and power lines require number one be put into effect? I am trying to find out the fall distance from the power company.
     
  6. Rob Baum

    Rob Baum Junior Member

    0
    Feb 10, 2007
    Professional Status:
    Certified General Appraiser
    State:
    Arkansas

    Fall zone and danger zone can be two different things.

    To address your question, the "fall zone" can only be determined by the engineer that designed it. There is simply no way of "eyeballing" the weak points designed into the tower that will affect where and how it falls.

    GENERALLY, they are designed to "crumple", rather than fall over like a tree - but depending on the tower design, what it is carrying, and its height, the danger zone can be much greater than either of these distances.

    My advice would be to use an extraordinary assumption that the fall and danger zones are limited to the right-of-way by design, and then report if any of the improvements are located within that right-of-way, or closer to the tower than the actual height of the tower.
     
  7. NC Appraising

    NC Appraising Senior Member

    0
    Apr 28, 2006
    Professional Status:
    Certified Residential Appraiser
    State:
    North Carolina



    Please don't do that. :Eyecrazy:
     
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