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How hard is it to get the 2000 trainee hours?

Discussion in 'Appraisal Education' started by ril3y3d, Jan 8, 2012.

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  1. ril3y3d

    ril3y3d New Member

    0
    Jan 7, 2012
    Professional Status:
    Appraiser Trainee
    State:
    California
    Hi-
    I am considering getting into this field. I see that I can prepare for the state (CA) test in 2-3 months with an online school, but then I need to be an apprentice. Do current appraisers use an apprentice or do they not want to see more competition get their license? I am considering Allied Real Estate School, is there a better one?
    Thanks!!

    Steve:)
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2012
  2. Thomas Fiehler

    Thomas Fiehler Senior Member

    4
    Jun 2, 2003
    Professional Status:
    Certified General Appraiser
    State:
    Ohio
    Before spending any money I would suggest you fnd somebody to work with. The hardest part of the whole process is finding a mentor, unless you were born into a family of appraisers. It's not so much that nobody wants to train their competition as that it is very time consuming for the mentor to take on trainees. The clients that the mentor has will likely not accept your work until late in the game or until you get certified. That means that you and the mentor will need to view each property together.
     
  3. leelansford

    leelansford Elite Member

    45
    Mar 29, 2002
    Professional Status:
    Certified Residential Appraiser
    State:
    Illinois
    See post #2 for some good advice.

    Your next step depends in good part upon your interests and talents. If these bring you to the residential lending side of the business, your options may be somewhat limited in moving forward.
     
  4. Smokey Bear

    Smokey Bear Elite Member

    0
    Dec 8, 2004
    Professional Status:
    Certified Residential Appraiser
    State:
    California
    Your title speaks volumes. No one wants to take on a trainee looking for hours. IF they want to take on a trainee, they want someone who will stick around, not someome who will split after getting their 'hours'. It's just not profitable to train your competition, since training someone costs more than it's worth.

    I suggest you spend a few days reading this forum before taking online classes, which, btw, show that you're looking to do the minimum possible to get by. If that's your standard, you'll find it even harder than impossible to find a supervisor.
     
  5. ril3y3d

    ril3y3d New Member

    0
    Jan 7, 2012
    Professional Status:
    Appraiser Trainee
    State:
    California
    Ummmm.... You dont know me. I have owned my own business, owned 4 homes and put myself through a very good college. I am also a Brown belt in Karate. I never take the easy way. I have seen a few listings that pay $10 an hour to an apprentice. If you think some one will be loyal for $10 an hour, you are nuts. I know there is a lot of competition, but that is fine, I work harder and smarter than 75% of the people out there. I may need to look at commercial, as at least you need a college degree and it weeds out the weak.

    thanks for the input. unfounded criticisms and all. :beer:
     
  6. Smokey Bear

    Smokey Bear Elite Member

    0
    Dec 8, 2004
    Professional Status:
    Certified Residential Appraiser
    State:
    California
    And if you think that an appraiser makes a profit paying you $10 an hour, YOU'RE nuts. Like I said, read the forum for a few days. 8 hours a day. Then come back and let's talk.

    Most appraisers think that you should pay THEM to TEACH you. The initial courses teach you how to pass an exam, not how to appraise. Most trainees leave their continuing education until the last minute, and expect the supervisor to teach them everything. The supe does all the same work you do, and teaches you, and checks your work, so don't think you're saving them time. They are completely liable for your work, also. They are required to sign the report, putting their license on the line. AND they're supposed to pay you, even though you don't save them any time, and in fact COST them in time, at least for your first year in the business, providing that there is even full time work for your first year. Otherwise, your training takes them longer.

    And if you never take the easy way, why would you consider online classes (the cheapest and worst) vs. AI classes, the best, and most expensive? Did you get your brown belt online? If that was offered, would you think that your brown belt meant the same thing as one offered online, with only a paper test at the end?

    You don't know what you don't know. You may be 'all that', but you don't know appraisal and you don't know the industry. So, like I said, read the forum for a few days before you decide that people who have been IN this industry for years don't know what they're talking about.

    We've seen it all before. Online classes (next to worthless). "How do I get my hours", not "how do I find the best classes to prepare myself for a new profession, and find the best mentor/supervisor"? And $10 doesn't buy loyalty is ignorant of how much a good mentor invests in you. Including providing you with the work, instead of you going out to find it. Your mentor also acts as a firewall between you and the client, who calls often to complain about stupid stuff because they don't read the report.

    You're not off to a good start here. One of the most important skills of an appraiser is researching market conditions. Why don't you start out by doing a good job researching the market for new appraisers? Then tell us how much work is available for a trainee or licensed appraiser, and who's hiring. What does the average AMC pay, what level of licensure to they require, and what will your average costs be per job? MLS, county records, business car insurance, E&O insurance, gas, maintenance. Software, software updates. Continuing education, license fees, upgrading your license. Computer. Extra phone. How will you get clients when you bail on your mentor?

    This is the reality of appraisal these days. Commercial may be different, but I don't know any commercial appraisers hiring these days either, and I don't know why they'd take on someone with anything less than AI classes, or at least classroom McKissock coursework. In fact, I don't know why they'd take on a trainee at all, when there are plenty of Certified Residentials that would love to upgraded to General, and already have training and experience in appraisal.

    Sorry to be so blunt, but poking a stick at a grouchy bear (bad sciatica today) isn't the smartest move. AND I'm actually giving you good information. What you do with it is your call.
     
  7. Smokey Bear

    Smokey Bear Elite Member

    0
    Dec 8, 2004
    Professional Status:
    Certified Residential Appraiser
    State:
    California
    A lot of appraisers say find a mentor first. I find this odd, I would want to see some investment on the trainee's part before I'd invest in them. I'd want to see evidence that they want it enough to do their research, get their education, have an education plan for when they'll complete the next courses (I would expect the next course to be completed within the next 6 months), and know that they have the $$ to support themselves for the next year without counting the $10/hr that they find so insulting.

    The system is broken. Until the AQB changes the 'supervisor' requirement to 1000 hours of internship at school, resulting in a narrative that would rival the AI courses that substitute for the demo report for residential, THEN 1000 hours with a supervisor, I don't see many trainees being hired by reputable appraisers anytime soon. Sure, there are still skippy appraisers out there that will take on trainees, but that's just an invitation to lose your license before the ink is dry.
     
  8. Ca Ar Independent

    Ca Ar Independent Senior Member

    22
    Sep 24, 2011
    Professional Status:
    Certified Residential Appraiser
    State:
    California
    I agree with Smokey. The system is definitely NOT set up to encourage the most experienced appraisers to take on a trainee. When I was a trainee, I was fortunate to find a supervisor right off the bat. He was a busy AG with lots of hobbies that he wanted to pursue, and liked the idea of having someone to do the leg work. I brought the concept of work sharing and growing the business, brought in my own clients and then I got to "figure things out" on my own, and he would sit down with me and correct the reports. We did this at all hours and at his convenience and I worked my ***** off and took his fist pounding and ranting. I was off to a good start but not really learning what I needed. When he offered me a pay cut I moved along and my next supervisor was a bit more informed and willing to teach me but this too ended when our work styles and business ethics didn't match up. I am still grateful for the time spent with both of them. I continued to take classes, learn and talk with my fellow appraisers. As Smokey points out, your motivation sounds more like "what's the easiest road" rather than "how can I best prepare for this challenging career". Most of us here have worked hard and long to get to where we are and even harder to stay here. We work twice as hard as we used to for half of the money and someone would have to be pretty motivated and humble to want to work alongside us to learn the ropes rather than be hung my them. Smokey offered you some good advice to which you gave a snippy response. No, she doesn't know you but she definitely can hear what you don't know. I would take a trainee if I met someone smart, hard working, meticulous, efficient, responsible and whom I felt I could trust to do as good a job or better than I do. The only way this can be worth the effort and liability is in order to build a business with this person and work in a win win capacity. Good luck to you, I love the work I do and should you proceed, I hope it is the same for you.
     
  9. Roy Courtney

    Roy Courtney Senior Member

    4
    Dec 8, 2006
    Professional Status:
    Certified General Appraiser
    State:
    Texas
    See Post #3 that encourages you to see Post #2. They are trying to tell it as it really is!
     
  10. ril3y3d

    ril3y3d New Member

    0
    Jan 7, 2012
    Professional Status:
    Appraiser Trainee
    State:
    California
    Thanks guys! No wonder everyone is a Realtor, all they have to do is smile, lie and drive you around. LOL!

    May not be enough juice in this lemon. Or your job is to scare away prospects?? hmmm...

    Don't worry, I am not a monkey, I will do my homework. I know, most people are stupid and it is hard not to group everyone together. I can take it.
     
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