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lower than expected appraisal

Discussion in 'Ask an Appraiser' started by miker5150, Oct 19, 2011.

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  1. miker5150

    miker5150 New Member

    0
    Oct 18, 2011
    Professional Status:
    General Public
    State:
    Indiana
    I am currently refinancing our home and recently had the appraisal completed. We refinanced previously in June 2009 and the home appraised at $230,000. Since then we have added improvements with the highlights being all new triple pane windows and a high efficiency furnace. With that in mind and the fact that our market has remained stable (current appraisal states as such), we were surprised when the most recent appraisal came in at $215,000.

    Long story short (I can fill in details as needed but don't want to be too long winded), the main issue is the previous appraisal listed the GLA as including both lower and main levels, which are both completely above grade. The house is set up functionally as a bi-level with the kitchen, dining, living, 3 bedrooms and bath on the upper level and family room, 4th bedroom, bath and laundry on the lower level, again all completely above grade. The garage is built in and you step up one step from the garage to enter the lower level of the house. The main entry to the home is on the lower level on grade. Total GLA 2131 sq ft. Comps were similarly sized 2 story homes. The appraiser added an addendum which stated "ALTHOUGH THE SUBJECT IS LISTED AS A BI LEVEL ON THE MLS IT IS ALL ABOVE GRADE AND
    IS CONSIDERED A 2 STORY DWELLING".


    The current appraisal describes the home as a mid-level style and lists the GLA as 1322 sq ft with 775 sq ft finished basement. Seems that is what accounts for the lower value even with the improvements in a stable market. Comps were all other mid-levels or what seem to be split entry foyers or tri-levels.

    Who's right?

    Full disclosure, this same scenario(upper level only included in GLA) happened when we refinanced shortly after purchasing the home in 2002, I can't recall the exact details but the loan ended up going through even though it appraised at $2000 less than we paid for it 6 months prior. We also refinanced in 2004 but I don't recall the issue coming up, it's possible an appraisal wasn't required.
     
    Last edited: Oct 19, 2011
  2. JTip

    JTip Senior Member

    90
    Oct 12, 2004
    Professional Status:
    Certified Residential Appraiser
    State:
    Pennsylvania
    Regardless of the correct/incorrect interpretation of the design/above grade area of your home, it appears that the appraiser correctly used SIMILARLY DESIGNED homes when comparing your home.

    A picture of your home (removing any address numbers to keep it confidential) will help determine what style of home and what floors should be counted towards above ground living area/gla.
     
  3. Smokey Bear

    Smokey Bear Elite Member

    0
    Dec 8, 2004
    Professional Status:
    Certified Residential Appraiser
    State:
    California
    Was any part of the lower level below grade? Even by a few inches?
     
  4. miker5150

    miker5150 New Member

    0
    Oct 18, 2011
    Professional Status:
    General Public
    State:
    Indiana
    I'll upload some pics from the current appraisal in a bit. There is a flower bed on the NE corner of the house that was added by the previous owner that I guess could give the illusion of that part of the house being below grade; it isn't.
     
  5. miker5150

    miker5150 New Member

    0
    Oct 18, 2011
    Professional Status:
    General Public
    State:
    Indiana
  6. stripes

    stripes Junior Member

    5
    Oct 11, 2004
    Professional Status:
    Certified General Appraiser
    State:
    Pennsylvania
    Looks like a raised ranch and I would include both levels, obviously minus the garage, in the gla. I would also attempt to compare it to other raised ranches. If those are limited in number, a 2-story could be used but it would either have to be without a basement level or an adjustment would be warranted. In the June 2009 appraisal, did the 2-story comparables have basements also?
     
  7. realbiz

    realbiz Junior Member

    0
    Mar 14, 2008
    Professional Status:
    Certified General Appraiser
    State:
    California
    Here I would suggest the owner go to the city building department and pull the records for your home. This will tell them the square footage of the house. Not knowing your area I don't know how building records are kept. I hope someone local comes on here and helps you out. If you are able to pull the building records of your home I would suggest you keep them on file for future use. You need to know one way other the other if this is livable square footage or a basement.
     
  8. stripes

    stripes Junior Member

    5
    Oct 11, 2004
    Professional Status:
    Certified General Appraiser
    State:
    Pennsylvania
    So you rely on the local assessment office to determine gla?

    Yes, I agree and you can do this much easier by utilizing ANSI Z765. Measure the outside of the house and count all space ENTIRELY above grade as gla with the exception of garage and unfinished space.
     
  9. Delta85

    Delta85 Elite Member

    6
    Sep 22, 2007
    Professional Status:
    Certified Residential Appraiser
    State:
    Connecticut
    The windows of that lower level look awfully low not to be below grade at least a bit. Are you sure it's not at least partially below grade? In my market, even a small section of a lower level being below grade makes it a basement.
     
  10. Calvin the Airedale

    Calvin the Airedale Elite Member
    Gold Supporting Member

    0
    Aug 17, 2004
    Professional Status:
    Certified General Appraiser
    State:
    Ohio
    Saying the market is and has been stable for any length of time in the immediate past is not the same thing as saying prices have not declined since your purchase or even since 2009. In fact, if your market has not experienced some price decline since either date, it is one of the few places in America that has been so lucky.

    Bear in mind you are comparing one opinion to another opinion. Both the 2009 valuation and the current valuation may be entirely appropriate, the authors may just differ on what they report as living area and in the manner in which they conduct the comparison.

    IOW, both reports may be credible. The fact that you are disappointed with the current opinion of value says nothing about the appropriateness of either opinion.
     
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