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Misplaced Appraiser Aggression

Discussion in 'General Appraisal Discussion' started by JSmith43, Dec 28, 2004.

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  1. JSmith43

    JSmith43 Elite Member

    22
    May 5, 2003
    Professional Status:
    Certified General Appraiser
    State:
    California
    It's apparently convenient & fun to kick the LO, Bruss, various banks, AVM's, AMC's, etc.

    After all, Appraisers "don't get no respect" from those sources. But appraisers even ream always "optimistic" appraisers (skippies), dumb appraisers (flunkies?), inexperienced appraisers, etc.

    I swear, even skippies have their set of standards. Shouldn't there be skippy light?
    How about smart skippy (covers tracks well)? Dumb skippy (the opposite of smart skippy)? Dumb skippy could also be called an orange jump suit wannabe.

    Helpful homeowners were my favorite pet peeve. It never failed, as the homeowner insisted on holding the dumb end of the tape, chatting away, I would fail to take my normal set of notes. Heck, the perimeter sketch usually didn't close :eek:

    Now, I'm not saying "let's tone it down". Heck no! :p I'm just wondering who the favorite villain would be? I wish I knew how to set up a pole, but, I'd probably just forget a favorite category.
     
  2. Bill_FL

    Bill_FL Senior Member

    0
    Aug 23, 2002
    Professional Status:
    Certified General Appraiser
    State:
    Florida
    Hey, as long as we are defining who the villan is, why not have one of our resident artsy-types draw him/her too?
     
  3. Ray Miller

    Ray Miller Elite Member

    0
    Feb 20, 2002
    Professional Status:
    Licensed Appraiser
    State:
    Wisconsin
    I think it might be like my Grandmother use to say: Put you (them) all in a sack and shake it up and you all would be fighten to see who comes out first."

    There are good and bad in both worlds.

    I have already been told twice this morning how stupid I am. and it just a little bit past 9:00 a.m. Think what the rest of the day is going to be like.
     
  4. Ross (CO)

    Ross (CO) Senior Member

    0
    Jan 17, 2002
    Professional Status:
    Certified Residential Appraiser
    State:
    Colorado
    How true, when said, that this is a thankless profession. How frequent those occasions can be that our actual performance of a job well-done just might mean that we will later be ridiculed and scorned. How many of us have ever received a holiday card or birthday greeting (because they once asked, and then remembered) from a client ? In today's marketplace and in our progressive recognition for how disjointed so many property owners, mortgage brokers and lenders can be regarding everybody else's "estimate of value" the odds for our satisfying the very persons awaiting our report are often and possibly less than 50%.

    Is anyone really surprised for the groundswell of admiration and optimism that comes with the advent of enhanced application of AVM's and other artificial and non-human forms of valuation alternatives ? It's not ALL about a gross collective hatred of the appraiser community but rather an attempt to craft a work-around that surficially appears worthy of use.....but lacks a comprehensive track record for ALL applications. Anyone surprised why there are efforts to use AVM's in a mode whereby they become appraiser-assisted ?, ie. they need an appraiser's supporting signature and acknowledgment of a value THEY have concluded. Whatever.......it takes.

    Rather than taking proactive steps to tick off or get-back-at our clients, on purpose, we should just proceed by doing our job the way we know it should be done. The chips will fall where they may. Many have posted examples of appraisal orders that cross-the-line of bad (client) ethics and coercive chicanery, right here in Forum, and I too have such examples in my files. I'll just continue to keep my prime examples of faxes, emails and recorded phone call messages within their respective workfiles.....in case I ever need to defend my report, or myself. I will continue to seek and secure my compensation from un-proven and unknown clients at the start of those assignments, prior to submitting that final report, because the odds of prompt, full and guaranteed payment after submitting the report are simply not in our favor.

    Yesterday I received a phone call from a first-timer. He wanted a comp check done on an address in town. I completely let that request fade...away...as I turned the conversation into discussion of other things, and NEVER returned to comment in any way upon those first words out of his mouth. Minutes later I received the faxed order, with acknowledgment of my c.a.d. payment arrangement, and as expected, his insistance on hand-writing on that order page some scribble about ....."doing a comp check, before I proceed". ---- Well, I always check my database for most-appropriate comps before I go visit and observe my subject property. ---- I will trust that this client staffer has already done HIS full due diligence about the potential of the subject property. I am sure he is VERY comfortable in accepting now a formal appraisal report......because he has checked ALL other options, sources and data at his disposal. There is NO way that my report could disappoint.......unless, or course, this client rep has hitched his wagon to the homeowner's estimate-of-value. Amazing how much influence property owners have in wrapping lender staffers around their pinkies. Imagine, the courage it takes for a lender staffer to tell Mr. Jones......"Well, I'll make a note of that estimate you have just shared, but we'll have to wait for that appraisal report to come in before we can completely structure a best loan for your needs"......(click)......Hello, hello, Mr. Jones....are you there ?

    Did anyone see the latest issue of AI's "Valuation" magazine ? There is one article on pages 20-21, called "Bringing Professionalism Back to the Appraisal Profession". It is very good. The four bullet-points on pg. 21 are exactly correct. There is hope, yes, that maybe they will take a proactive role in letting their voice be heard more loudly, and giving a new burst of support for the residential appraiser, too. I may now reconsider whether membership is something I should pursue, and maybe commit to their partnered Master's Degree program. What's hard to reconcile is whether there will still be a future demand for appraisers with those academic achievements. Unless the total natonal pool of clientele' (and those who actually HOLD the loan paper !) are willing to re-define their standards and preferences, and be willing to side-step this deplorable zeal to push appraisal fees downward, the future will remain tentative.
     
  5. JSmith43

    JSmith43 Elite Member

    22
    May 5, 2003
    Professional Status:
    Certified General Appraiser
    State:
    California
    You still have to leap through a potential fire hoop: peer review of work samples.

    I think several MAI's were tarred, but not feathered post S&L bailout. Some went on to wear orange jump suits. A new round of bad scandals could tar & feather the MAI designation, don't you think? A reasonable return on investment in a long fought pursuit of a designation is now a crap shoot, IMO.
     
  6. Head Surfer

    Head Surfer Administrator Staff Member Founder Moderator

    31
    Jan 4, 2002
    Professional Status:
    Retired Appraiser
    State:
    Florida
    As far as no respect and deciding who is to blame, I read somewhere that when you are trying to figure out who to blame for something that for every finger you point at someone else, there's two pointing back at you.

    Don't know who wrote that, and don't feel like Googling it.
     
  7. Tim Hicks (Texas)

    Tim Hicks (Texas) Elite Member
    Gold Supporting Member

    70
    Jan 15, 2002
    Professional Status:
    Certified Residential Appraiser
    State:
    Texas
    I have worn this sentence out: Appraisers as a whole have nobody to blame but themselves. Skippies, AMC's, AVM's, lender pressure, etc would not exist if we as a profession did not allow them to exist.
     
  8. Bill_FL

    Bill_FL Senior Member

    0
    Aug 23, 2002
    Professional Status:
    Certified General Appraiser
    State:
    Florida
    Wayne,

    That is a good comment. Especially if we put on the hat of consumer. Ours is a consumer driven society. We often hear of the analogy that some guy can go buy a $100,000 Porsche in an hour, but it takes a month to buy a $100,000 house.

    What nobody seems willing to expalin to the consumer advocates is that the lender has established before hand that the value of the commodity, in the car scenario, has been established as the MSRP or book value. No such book exists for homes. As far as I know, there is no such equivelent to Fannie for auto loans. Being governement sponsored also means being bailed out by government (read you and me as tax payers).

    But, we have reached a point in society where we as consumers expect it all, and expect it right now. We do not allow for excuses that cause a delay in our immediate gratification. How aggrivated do you get when you pull up to the drive through and it takes more than two or three minutes to get throught the line? The response from the lending workd has been to try to find a way to speed up the process. We as appraisers are in that loop. I really do not think it is an issue of valuation products, but the speed with which those products are delivered. I would bet lenders would pay more than you charge now if they could get their full URAR type appraisals back within 4 hours of ordering them. Sort of like an inverse to the price/marketing time theories. The faster you can provide quality work, the more they would pay. (Until market saturation of course).

    Appraising is not going anywhere anytime soon. The next Bill Gates of appraising will be the guy or gal who can figure out how to deliver ethical, high quality appraisal products with the speed of an AVM. There was a guy from NY that used to frequent this place. He has mini-vans equipped as offices, wireless communications, etc. I think he is on to something. He can probably deliver an appraisal report within a few hours of seeing the property, before he ever returns to his office. (in most cases, we all know we have the problem child appraisals)

    Anyway, I do think that we as a group are hollering about buggywhips while the car is being perfected and marketed.
     
  9. Scott Kibler

    Scott Kibler Elite Member
    Gold Supporting Member

    68
    Oct 7, 2003
    Professional Status:
    Certified Residential Appraiser
    State:
    Illinois
    Off topic...sort of ;)

    My wife just landed herself a part time gig. Got it from a friend and former co-worker who got it from some one else he knew. This (job?) is I think, called a "scout".

    Client is the parent company of several chain clothing stores commonly found in your local mall.

    Assignment is to drive to a particular mall on a monthly basis and take 5 or 6 digital photos of each store's (2 or 3 stores per mall) window displays; then return home, rename each photo to something like: AJ's Mens Store Downtown Mall 1, then e-mail them to the client. No commentary or analysis is necessary.

    Fee for each trip is $100 plus expenses.

    How does the time/work/risk/compensation equation compare to your typical assignment?

    Oh yeah I forgot!....client provides a digital camera. :eek:
     
  10. Karl

    Karl Elite Member

    0
    Jan 15, 2002
    Professional Status:
    Licensed Appraiser
    State:
    Arizona
    If your LIKED by (most) everyone in a profession such as ours U are NOT doing your Job. If your RESPECTED by (most) everyone then U ARE doing your job.

    I am proud to say very few people LIKE me.
     
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