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Modular, Manufactured, or just low quality

Discussion in 'Urgent - Help Needed' started by Tim Schneider, Sep 30, 2011.

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  1. Tim Schneider

    Tim Schneider Member

    0
    Feb 8, 2007
    Professional Status:
    Certified Residential Appraiser
    State:
    Wisconsin
    Our assessor does not classify if a house is manufactures, modular, stick built, facory built, etc. Went to house today, and I need some help figuring out what this is:

    - Per owner- bought from a factiry built housing company in 1978 called "Marshfield Homes", who is no longer in business
    - House sits on a full basement, and when looking underneath there was no evidence of a steel frame, a hitch, axels. The floor is wood joist framing.
    - The original part of the house is 14x76, and in 1984 a family room addition was attached.
    - House has been renovated several times, and any evidence of tags or labels are gone

    What do you think, manufactured on 1004c or use 1004? If 1004c, how do you handle the addition?
     

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  2. Lobo Fan

    Lobo Fan Elite Member

    0
    Nov 28, 2004
    Professional Status:
    Certified Residential Appraiser
    State:
    New Mexico
    If there is no frame I would think it is an off frame modular which compares to site built, except that it looks like a manufactured so there could be some market resistance.
     
  3. Michigan CG

    Michigan CG Moderator Staff Member Moderator

    158
    Nov 1, 2006
    Professional Status:
    Certified General Appraiser
    State:
    Michigan
    Low grade modular at best. Looks like manufactured (style). Significant discount here.
     
  4. Terrel L. Shields

    Terrel L. Shields Elite Member
    Gold Supporting Member

    226
    May 2, 2002
    Professional Status:
    Certified General Appraiser
    State:
    Arkansas
    Looks like a United Bilt or similar construction.
     
  5. Restrain

    Restrain Elite Member

    9
    Jan 22, 2002
    Professional Status:
    Certified General Appraiser
    State:
    Florida
    No steel frame, not a mfg home. No tags to prove modular, treat as stick-built. As an aside back in this period I saw several companies building stick built homes on heavy frame foundations that looked like this but there were no state regs for modulars at the time. They would be moved to the site on a flatbed and set on a P&b foundation. This is probably what you have here.
     
  6. Kim Whiting

    Kim Whiting Senior Member

    5
    Feb 17, 2003
    Professional Status:
    Licensed Appraiser
    State:
    Michigan
    14x76 is very troubling. no one builds even kit homes with these crazy single wide dimensions. I'd continue research.....your state have records of titles? We all know owners tear off hud tags and re-side to hide the evidence of being manufactured....the dimensions are the killer here....plus, additions off a manufactured are areas you don't really want to get into.
     
  7. Jo Ann Meyer Stratton

    Jo Ann Meyer Stratton Elite Member

    25
    Jan 16, 2002
    Professional Status:
    Certified Residential Appraiser
    State:
    Arizona
    In the late 70s and early 80s there were manufactured homes built to the HUD that were not on a steel frame or chassis. They are still considered manufactured homes because they were constructed to the HUD building code.

    I looked up Marshfield in my 1983 Blue Book and Marshfields were constructed by Wick Building. So until you verify the original building code while it was under construction in a factory--there is a very, very good chance you have a manufactured home---not a modular home.
     
  8. VolcanoLvr

    VolcanoLvr Senior Member

    5
    Oct 30, 2003
    Professional Status:
    Certified Residential Appraiser
    State:
    Washington
    Jo Ann is the 'resident expert' about these on the AF. She is correct - the building code the dwelling was built-to is key.

    I worked for a MODULAR home manufacturer in a past-life, so have a bit of perspective on your property.

    1- the power pole & meter to the left side of your photo is a fairly strong give-away that this property is MANUFACTURED, however, it could be a MODULAR ... so this is not a reliable bit of data either way. Most site-built homes have the meter on the side of the dwelling, not detached. When we built MODULAR homes, we had to know where the power access was coming from so that the power panel was located correctly - on/in the dwelling. However, back then, the manufacturer might have allowed a detached meter, with power cable going into the breaker box inside the dwelling.

    2- since this is built on a basement, the interior walls in the basement could help you decide the type of dwelling construction. Because the typical MANUFACTURED home 'foundation' is two steel 'I' beams running the length of the dwelling, the supporting walls in the basement will have to be crosswise to those, about every 10 feet or so. This would break up the basement into small rooms. Or perhaps the basement was constructed with steel cross-beams and the dwelling 'foundation' sits on those. In this case, the basement might have steel posts about every 10' centered down the length, or a supporting wall down the center of the basement. This type of construction also applies to a MODULAR home because spanning 14' without center support probably would not be done. So, again, a mystery as to your home.

    3- transportation of MANUFACTURED or MODULAR houses along roads/highways is governed by regulations in place at the time it was built/moved. I seriously doubt a MANUFACTURED or MODULAR home would have been 76' long in 1978. Since you say the home has had additions, I suspect the original dwelling was 60' long or less, which would have been more likely back then. The dimension of the basement might give you some clue, especially if the basement does not continue under the addition areas.

    So...what to do? Well, absence any overwhelming evidence to the contrary, you could do this on the 1004 form..............but just to be safe include a GIANT EXTRAORDINARY ASSUMPTION that the home is not MANUFACTURED, and a great deal of commentary discussing the situation. If it truly is a MODULAR home, it should be done on the 1004, not 1004C.

    Another option, and probably safer: put the report on hold. Then contact ITBS, the organization which records and tracks all manufactured home sales. Perhaps they can help you determine if it actually is MANUFACTURED, vs Modular. They normally need S/N's or HUD #, but perhaps some of their old reference material (like Jo Ann's) could help determine the code this company used at that time.

    Let us know what happens with this report!
     
  9. Hank Outlaw

    Hank Outlaw Member

    0
    Feb 17, 2002
    Professional Status:
    Certified Residential Appraiser
    State:
    North Carolina
    First of all, kudos for the fact that you are asking, investigating, researching, etc. I recently appraised a home that turned out to be a 1970's modular in a neighborhood of like homes. Several of the other modulars were listed as site-built in the MLS (basic no-frills ranch homes). The home had been updated / remodeled to the extent that the only labeling was a small sticker in the breaker panel. The cabinets were replaced so there was no indication in the kitchen.

    Just a thought... regardless of what it [was] originally - manufactured, modular, panelized, etc., how does it look relative to design, quality, materials / finish now? You mentioned that there were no tags, etc.... does that mean nothing inside the kitchen cabinets, master bedroom closet and/or breaker panel also? Just curious if there is any labeling anywhere.

    If you have exhausted all due diligence, I suggest describing it as best you can, include plenty of good photos, and select the most similar sales possible, particularly if you can locate another such property with regard to "what the heck is it anyway?". It certainly looks manufactured or modular vs. stick-built.

    Best wishes,

    Hank O.
     

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  10. Couch Potato

    Couch Potato Elite Member

    0
    Mar 15, 2004
    Professional Status:
    Certified Residential Appraiser
    State:
    North Carolina
    Given the information provided I would simply do it on a 1004 with similar low-quality houses as comparable sales assuming the 1984 addition was done following the proper rules. It is most likely the original construction was low quality modular construction meaning it was done to local code. With the narrow format it has nothing to distinguish it from a site built house of the same width since it is not on a steel chasis. There is a chance it was originally done to the HUD code, but I don't see where proving that, should it be the case, would make any difference in the valuation other than the form used. Your goal should be to accurately reflect how the market views the property rather than worry about arcane rules.
     
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