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Old 10-19-2006, 02:02 PM
Jason Snider Jason Snider is offline
 
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Default High-rise vs Mid-rise

What is the technical difference that makes a condo project a high-rise vs a mid-rise. Or in other words how many floors classifies a condo project a high-rise? My subject has 12 stories.
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Old 10-19-2006, 02:14 PM
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Chris Colston Chris Colston is offline
 
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I don't believe there is any set directive. I usually use 8 floors as a the determining factor. Anything 8 floors or less I call a mid-rise, anything over 8 floors I call a high rise. Your mileage may vary, but it really has to do with fire protection. On this side of the state the county has height restrictions, mostly because we don't have the fire equipment to go higher than 65 feet (6 floors).
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Old 10-19-2006, 02:17 PM
Jason Snider Jason Snider is offline
 
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Very good. Thank you!
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Old 10-19-2006, 02:49 PM
James Sturm James Sturm is offline
 
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I would think it would depend where the building is located. For instance, a 8-15 story building in Downtown Chicago is considered a mid-rise. Where if a 15 story was located in the suburbs with heights averaging from 3-6 stories, an 8-15 story building would be considered a high-rise.
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Old 10-19-2006, 03:02 PM
Brian Weaver Brian Weaver is offline
 
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Lowrise is 1 to 3 stories
Midrise is 4 to 9
Highrise is 10+.

That's it.
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Old 10-19-2006, 03:16 PM
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Sheikh Yerbouti Sheikh Yerbouti is offline
 
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I believe CoStar sez anything 9 stories or more is high-rise. And we know how reliable they are!
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Old 10-19-2006, 03:48 PM
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Jungle Boy Jungle Boy is offline
 
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I did one in a 15 story building this week, and called it a mid-rise.
As I was sending it of to the client, I thought about changing it to high-rise, but didn't get around to it.
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Old 10-19-2006, 04:19 PM
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Richard Carlsen Richard Carlsen is offline
 
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YUPPER definition:

Mid Rise Building: Body falling off of the roof tends to bounce a little.

High Rise Building: Body falling off of the roof hits with enough speed and force that there is no bounce (just a loud "Whummpf" sound). Body parts are sometimes known to come undone.
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Old 10-19-2006, 04:22 PM
Brian Weaver Brian Weaver is offline
 
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I like Richard's definition.

Yeah, yeah I know...the Realtors say that a low rise is up to 7 stories and a midrise is 7-25...yada yada...and NAIOP says....and BOMA says....

In short; who cares?
  #10  
Old 10-20-2006, 10:57 AM
Jason Snider Jason Snider is offline
 
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LOL Richard
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