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  #1  
Old 01-07-2011, 07:47 PM
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prasercat prasercat is offline
 
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Default A case for Reverse Osmosis Purifiers.

There is no substitute for Reverse Osmosis systems - those drip or pass through filters (mostly just activated carbon) are a waste of money. This was brought up before in another thread, but the news release is new.


http://www.npr.org/2011/01/07/132743...ems-of-its-own


http://reverse-osmosis-water-filter-...s-methods.html
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  #2  
Old 01-07-2011, 08:42 PM
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Lakefront boater Lakefront boater is offline
 
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Here is a link for a VERY good drip filter which doesn't need to be installed, just put the thing on your counter. There is also a fluoride filter which can be added to this unit. I do enjoy reverse osmosis and the sweet taste it produces but this one has worked great for me without having to install anything and only change the filters once a year. Check it out.

http://www.directive21.com/products.html
  #3  
Old 01-07-2011, 09:47 PM
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Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lakefront boater View Post
Here is a link for a VERY good drip filter which doesn't need to be installed, just put the thing on your counter. There is also a fluoride filter which can be added to this unit. I do enjoy reverse osmosis and the sweet taste it produces but this one has worked great for me without having to install anything and only change the filters once a year. Check it out.

http://www.directive21.com/products.html
Its a high end drip system and should be similar in performance to carbon. Everything they use to describe the system is how activated carbon works. Many small holes for molecules, viruses and bacteria to cling to, but they cannot compare to R.O. for the broad spectrum of items filtered, all the way down to individual heavy metal or radioactive metal atoms, or any atoms in general of concern, which micron sized pores as found in this product or carbon do not trap efficiently since a micron is immensely larger than an atom. It would take about 10,000 atoms layed side by side to equal the distance of about 1 micron. These filters are made of porous material where the filtration holes are several microns in diameter.

The way these drip filters work isn't exactly like passing through a screen, but by creating a maze of small openings in a three dimensional medium where there are millions of tiny holes in the medium that lead to dead-ends or cul-de-sacs. There is a certain probability that the particle will find its way randomly into the sac, but this method primarily depends upon an electronic attraction between the filter material and the item that needs to be filtered. material may also occur in a particular case, which helps greatly. However, activated carbon does not bind well to certain chemicals (molecules) or atoms; such as, ammonia, alcohols, glycols, strong acids and bases, boric acid, metals and most atoms; such as, lithium, sodium, iron, lead, arsenic, flourine.

It works, its just isn't comparable. If you have great pristine water source, like a spring, and just need a little insurance, then then a carbon or micron filter would be enough.

An RO system has a series of filters, typically the first is a filter material about 5 microns to remove the large stuff, then a couple different types of charcoal filters, then the membrane (which is for the really small stuff and atoms) and even possibly a UV light filter as the last stage to be 100% sure no bacteria or virus can get through, even if the filter or membrane material has a structural failure. That is the concern, since failure may not be immediately apparent and it is really rare.
  #4  
Old 01-07-2011, 10:24 PM
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I ran a reverse osmosis system for 20 years, eventually it came to my attention that my water bill was over $300 every two months while my neighbors were all in the $65 to $85 range, since water is continually running through the RO system into the drain I disconnected it, my water bills are now comparable to my neighbors, I figured that that thing cost me about $24,000 over the years, and this says nothing about the cost of the expensive 4 filters.
  #5  
Old 01-07-2011, 11:24 PM
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Originally Posted by Cigar View Post
I ran a reverse osmosis system for 20 years, eventually it came to my attention that my water bill was over $300 every two months while my neighbors were all in the $65 to $85 range, since water is continually running through the RO system into the drain I disconnected it, my water bills are now comparable to my neighbors, I figured that that thing cost me about $24,000 over the years, and this says nothing about the cost of the expensive 4 filters.
Additional water usage is a cost but that is an incredible water bill!

Water is needed to flush the membrane, so it takes several gallons of "dirty water" to make one gallon of pure water. The cycle runs, like a washing machine. It isn't a continuous flow, but when the membrane gets flushed, the water runs over the membrane on the impure side of the chamber. Once the pure water reserve tank is full, the system shuts down.

Were you using it for the entire house water supply (I've hear of it done) or just a extra spout on the sink and the fridge icemaker and water dispensor? It sounds like either your system was defective or you were using massive amounts of RO water.
  #6  
Old 01-07-2011, 11:41 PM
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If you were to occupy a residense for 20 years where I live, and consume the local tap water without an RO system, you would likely be in a casket today, regardless of your age. :--)
Of course I am exaggerating, but RO systems are so common where I am. Not having one in many local markets, typically impacts the value of the property.
  #7  
Old 01-07-2011, 11:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Prasercat
It sounds like either your system was defective or you were using massive amounts of RO water.
No, I just had the tank, filters and mechanism under the sink, when my mother was alive I got tired of seeing her lug gallon jugs to those machines, so when I remodeled the kitchen I installed the best unit I could find, I noticed from day one that a slot in the bottom of the spout had water constantly dripping down a line into the waste. When I discovered how much more I was using than neighbors I researched it and found that something like 80 gallons of water is consumed for every gallon processed, and it went on 24 hours per day whether the unit was used or not, I called the manufacturer and was told this was normal.
  #8  
Old 01-08-2011, 12:20 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cigar View Post
No, I just had the tank, filters and mechanism under the sink, when my mother was alive I got tired of seeing her lug gallon jugs to those machines, so when I remodeled the kitchen I installed the best unit I could find, I noticed from day one that a slot in the bottom of the spout had water constantly dripping down a line into the waste. When I discovered how much more I was using than neighbors I researched it and found that something like 80 gallons of water is consumed for every gallon processed, and it went on 24 hours per day whether the unit was used or not, I called the manufacturer and was told this was normal.

Strange, maybe it is a variant. I could hear when mine was flushing and then it stopped completely. The after a cycle completed, it would flush again, but it was a while between cycles. My water consumption is fairly normal.
  #9  
Old 01-08-2011, 01:34 AM
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Cigar, it appears the older units were much less efficient and created a lot of waste water. The newer technology is much more efficient (there are even zero waste systems or that produce two gallons of pure water with only one gallon of waste water). I'm not in a position to recommend any, since there is a large market out there in this product and much has to do with what you are willing to pay.

I've place two links here which shed some light on water efficiency and how it can be achieved and a product that produces 2 gallons for 1 gallon of waste (as an example), which is much more efficient than mine, which was purchased back in 2002. Evidently, some of the older home systems produced 90 gallons of waste water for 5 gallons of pure. I'd say, 2.5 gallons or 5 gallons of waste is way better than 90! You may want to give it another consideration.

http://spectrapure.com/low_waste_systems.htm


http://www.advancedwaterfilters.com/...is-system.html
  #10  
Old 04-05-2011, 03:03 PM
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Mile High Trout Mile High Trout is offline
 
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If you're in a pinch, in a camping situation or something similar, you can utilize a large freznel lense and a several glass jar distillation process to attain biologically pure water, also filtering out heavy materials.

It's just like making moonshine, but without the shine, and with focused sun energy, rather than fire.
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