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  #1  
Old 06-21-2011, 04:03 PM
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Mile High Trout Mile High Trout is offline
 
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Post Simple math quiz. / Topic - effective theorems

Simple math quiz. Topic - effective theorems

The other day I picked up a pack of gum for $1.00.

There were 14 pieces of gum there.

How much did each individual piece of gum cost?

Please state your theorem.

Those tricky gum producers! I realized that this certain approach was difficult to compare as a consumer, which is why the number relationship intrigued me.

You know me, always thinking thrifty.
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Old 06-21-2011, 04:09 PM
stefan olafson stefan olafson is offline
 
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Cost for the pack was $1.00, we don't know what the packaging cost for each individual piece of gum, nor for the pack itself. $1.00 / 14 = $0.0714 per piece inclusive of packaging.
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Old 06-21-2011, 04:14 PM
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Is the question what is the cost of the gum or is it how much did the customer pay for each piece of gum?

I tried helping my 13 y/o grandson with his math last night and failed miserably.

24 = -x2 - 13x
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  #4  
Old 06-21-2011, 04:27 PM
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Mile High Trout Mile High Trout is offline
 
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I like to use Saxon math on everything possible. I'm an old fashioned pen and paper guy, or if possible in my head because I enjoy it. When I see comparative numbers, I like to find common denominators and break down big numbers to more simple easy to work with figures.

Saxon math Is over Of = % over 100 left the remainder which was time consuming to work with. I was scribbling down an unnecessary amount of math to figure this one out, late while having a beer. I thought to myself, what tricky gum guys! Then I said to myself, you're making it to complicated. I guess that's a normal rhythm for me. Ha

This was intriguing to me, because as a customer walking through line, you dang near needed a calculator to gauge the price per piece (packaging included of course).

This is one example where straight line algebra makes a tough consideration, rather simple.
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  #5  
Old 06-21-2011, 04:35 PM
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Canative, thats 24 = negative x squared minus 13x?

Just wanted to make sure I'm reading it right.

I said simple math! You broke the rules!



This is a silly thread, but I was taking a break.

If 14 pieces of the pie occupied a 100 mm circumference circle, what would the length of each portion of outer circumference be?

Better yet, how much surface area would an individual portion of the 14 total pieces occupy of a sphere with a 100mm circumference?! Just kidding. Now that's just an unnecessary math quiz. Good thing homes square up! : - ]
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  #6  
Old 06-21-2011, 04:53 PM
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That is the problem in my grandsons summer school homework. He was flinging terms around like variables and polynominals. lol... I felt like a 'tard.

I can do grocery store math in my head. Have to if I want to eat and still have money left over. 14 pieces of gum for a dollar? It's around 7 cents each. 7 x 10 is 70 and 4 x 7 is 28. $.98. not enough left over for anything else.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mile High Trout View Post
Canative, thats 24 = negative x squared minus 13x?

Just wanted to make sure I'm reading it right.

I said simple math! You broke the rules!



This is a silly thread, but I was taking a break.

If 14 pieces of the pie occupied a 100 mm circumference circle, what would the length of each portion of outer circumference be?

Better yet, how much surface area would the 14 pieces occupy of a sphere with a 100mm circumference?! Just kidding. Now that's just an unnecessary math quiz. Good thing homes square up! : - ]
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Old 06-21-2011, 04:54 PM
stefan olafson stefan olafson is offline
 
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I'd only be wondering if the pie tasted good! :-)
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Old 06-21-2011, 04:57 PM
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Apparently I picked up my math skills from my late uncle Levon. He said "Pi r2? Pie aren't square. Pie are round. Cornbread are square."
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Old 06-21-2011, 05:03 PM
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My Gum Management Company charges you $1.00 for a pack of gum and takes 6 of the 14 pieces as a fee for gum management services, therefore each piece of gum costs you $0.125.

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  #10  
Old 06-21-2011, 05:59 PM
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This thread is unexpectedly entertaining. That's what I was looking for Canative, the basic metric breakdown to consider the remainder. But you already knew 7 was the figure. One could have easily spent too much time using a different figure to try and figure that out while in line. The only common denominator is 2, so that makes it not simple anymore.

Those advertisers are tricky. 14 pieces of gum for a dollar makes math nerds perform impulse buys? That's my new hypotheses, now I just have to prove it. This is going to take empirical evidence and surveys. First I've got to pick out math nerds in line, then rush them with a survey and a timer clock if I catch them reaching for gum.

I found this video to be low priced and highly rewarding, you should pick up a copy. Also is good for tutoring. http://www.amazon.com/Math-Video-Tut...8695217&sr=1-1 You can call it a business expense.

Actually I keep this on now and then for my newborn. She's not old enough to chose what to watch yet, so I pop that one in. It's really cool that way because it's just a hand and a dry erase board, and lots of math. She counts here little fingers when it's on, so that's cool. But I'm only developing her neural pathways for math capacity at this point. The real milestone in early learning will be when she can actually purposefully count to 5.

24= -x2 - 13x. That's a doozy. X = -1? I'm not sure if I'm doing that right. Please tell.
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