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  #1  
Old 10-14-2011, 08:56 PM
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Default basement/crawlspace

Does anyone know at what point in height does a basement stop being a basement and become just a crawl space? Does ansi address this?
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Old 10-14-2011, 09:32 PM
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Originally Posted by John Mancine View Post
Does anyone know at what point in height does a basement stop being a basement and become just a crawl space? Does ansi address this?
As I understand it min. basement height should be about 7'6" finished floor to lowest projection of the ceiling (ex: ductwork) Normal folks should be able to walk without ducking underneath pipes, ductwork.

In an older home, if its less than the above but higher than a typical crawl, it could be considered a cellar.
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Old 10-15-2011, 01:15 AM
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Cellar and Basement are the same thing, two words for the space below the first floor as far as I'm, and my market, is concerned. A crawl space is a space where you have to crawl. Perhaps you have a crouch space? I'm almost kidding but really if it's 5 feet I'd call it a Partial Basement, explain what I mean, and move on with my life.
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Old 10-15-2011, 01:52 AM
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If the height is declining, calculate the basement sf just like you would calculate the acceptable GLA in a sloping finished area which functions as GLA per ANSI standards. The rest is crawlspace. Read the ANSI standards and use them to your advantage. They are here to help you.
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Old 10-15-2011, 02:00 AM
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If you are a bit insecure with your measurements, so be it. Just make sure you explain your actions in the report to detail so you can easily defend any potential altercations down the road. Just like anything else, it's gets easier with experience.
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Old 10-15-2011, 08:38 AM
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If the height is declining, calculate the basement sf just like you would calculate the acceptable GLA in a sloping finished area which functions as GLA per ANSI standards. The rest is crawlspace. Read the ANSI standards and use them to your advantage. They are here to help you.
ANSI standards do not address required height for basements because ANSI is only defining above grade square footage.

Quote:
Does ansi address this?
No.

Quote:
As I understand it min. basement height should be about 7'6" finished floor to lowest projection of the ceiling (ex: ductwork) Normal folks should be able to walk without ducking underneath pipes, ductwork.
Source?

The best way to clarify to the reader of the report is to put in a paragraph about the basement/cellar.
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Old 10-15-2011, 09:49 AM
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Originally Posted by Obsolescent View Post
As I understand it min. basement height should be about 7'6" finished floor to lowest projection of the ceiling (ex: ductwork) Normal folks should be able to walk without ducking underneath pipes, ductwork.

In an older home, if its less than the above but higher than a typical crawl, it could be considered a cellar.
You've got to be kidding.... That would make most every basement in Michigan, built before the 1990s, a crawl space. Typically, we see the I beem and duct work at 6 feet +/-.
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Old 10-15-2011, 10:21 AM
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Adherence to ANSI Standards by a governing municipality is entirely voluntary. Best course of action is to confirm LOCAL building code standards.
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Old 10-15-2011, 11:02 AM
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IMHO the fundamental difference between the two is basements have floors while crawl spaces have rough surfaces.
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Old 10-16-2011, 09:14 AM
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I was in one the other day. 5 1/2' tall to the bottom of the floor joists, 4 1/2' under the furnace ducts. Older house on slab with newer 800 s.f. addition over cellar.

There was an interior door and stairs down to it, concrete block walls, concrete floor. Owner used it for storage and furnace and water heater were located there, all painted white.

I called it a cellar and gave it slight additional value, $1,000 I believe, above the comps with crawl spaces. $125K house value range.
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