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  #1  
Old 10-31-2011, 03:11 PM
vsalvitti vsalvitti is offline
 
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Default Handicap Modifications

AM evaluating a property where the the home across the street recently sold..same style, age, design, etc...except it had some handicap modifications..some in kitchen..lower shelving for microwave, third bath was handicap accessible..I am wondering if there should be any adjustment consideration given to the comparable with modifications as the typical buyer may not readily accept soem of the minor adjustments...the bath is a third bath, typicalyy the homes have 2.5..this has 3.5...it is a new kitchen and from the photos it appears the only modification is a lower microwave shelf. Doorways are wider..and lightswitches lower....There are no exterior modicfications for access as it is all GL entry....Anyone have experience with this
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Old 10-31-2011, 03:47 PM
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VegasWayne VegasWayne is online now
 
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The correct term for these features is wheelchair accessible, never use the word handicapped in your report. The market determines whether or not these features merit an adjustment. In an age-restricted community there is more likely greater demand for wheelchair accessibility than in a breeder-block neighborhood. The extra bath would probably merit an adjustment but the special cabinets in the kitchen would likely limit the potential buyers to people that need the wheelchair accessibility. If it is a two-story the modifications may have little value as people in wheelchairs usually prefer not to have stairs.
  #3  
Old 10-31-2011, 04:04 PM
vsalvitti vsalvitti is offline
 
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Originally Posted by VegasWayne View Post
The correct term for these features is wheelchair accessible, never use the word handicapped in your report. The market determines whether or not these features merit an adjustment. In an age-restricted community there is more likely greater demand for wheelchair accessibility than in a breeder-block neighborhood. The extra bath would probably merit an adjustment but the special cabinets in the kitchen would likely limit the potential buyers to people that need the wheelchair accessibility. If it is a two-story the modifications may have little value as people in wheelchairs usually prefer not to have stairs.

I just spoke to listing agent and kitchen did not have lower shelvesmodifications were only to a rear Family room with it's own access and a very large wheelchair accessible shower was built in the room and it was used as a first floor bedroom...so this area was the only area that was significantly modified...wider doors on rest of first floor...I am trying to determine whether to make an adjustment because of this room with the wheelchair accessible bath...the rest of the house would still appeal to the typical buyer...do I make a postive adjustment to the comp for cost to change back to a room a buyer can better utilize?
  #4  
Old 10-31-2011, 04:25 PM
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Michigan CG Michigan CG is offline
 
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Originally Posted by vsalvitti View Post
...do I make a postive adjustment to the comp for cost to change back to a room a buyer can better utilize?
And exactly where are you going to find justification for that adjustment?

If you feel this is a negative factor to the comparable I would suggest addressing that in the Reconciliation of Value with qualitative analysis.

Quote:
....never use the word handicapped in your report......
Um, why not?
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  #5  
Old 10-31-2011, 06:32 PM
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PropertyEconomics PropertyEconomics is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VegasWayne View Post
The correct term for these features is wheelchair accessible, never use the word handicapped in your report. The market determines whether or not these features merit an adjustment. In an age-restricted community there is more likely greater demand for wheelchair accessibility than in a breeder-block neighborhood. The extra bath would probably merit an adjustment but the special cabinets in the kitchen would likely limit the potential buyers to people that need the wheelchair accessibility. If it is a two-story the modifications may have little value as people in wheelchairs usually prefer not to have stairs.

The correct term is "Handicapped Accessible" .... it is used in all Section 504 Housing Laws, the Uniform Federal Accessibility Standards (UFAS), as well as ADA guidelines. Handicapped though is far more than just a wheelchair so one needs to be careful as to what they are describing and why. "Handicapped" is a protected class and how their accomodations are described can be legally important to the describer.

Cabinets, if fully wheelchair accessible, will be at 34 inches vs the standard 36 inches, door ways and halls will be wider, light switches may be lower as well as the electrical panel, and grab bars may be installed in the bath along with special vanities, sinks, and potentially toilets. Ramps will typically provide for access to the outside with level landing areas at the exterior doorway.

My guess is this home was modified and does not meet all the accessibility standards ... but thats just a guess. The additional costs of these items is surprisingly nominal over normal construction, however, to reconvert a fully accessible property may be more expensive.
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Last edited by PropertyEconomics : 10-31-2011 at 06:41 PM.
  #6  
Old 11-01-2011, 08:32 AM
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Don Clark Don Clark is offline
 
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Originally Posted by PropertyEconomics View Post
The correct term is "Handicapped Accessible" .... it is used in all Section 504 Housing Laws, the Uniform Federal Accessibility Standards (UFAS), as well as ADA guidelines. Handicapped though is far more than just a wheelchair so one needs to be careful as to what they are describing and why. "Handicapped" is a protected class and how their accomodations are described can be legally important to the describer.

Cabinets, if fully wheelchair accessible, will be at 34 inches vs the standard 36 inches, door ways and halls will be wider, light switches may be lower as well as the electrical panel, and grab bars may be installed in the bath along with special vanities, sinks, and potentially toilets. Ramps will typically provide for access to the outside with level landing areas at the exterior doorway.

My guess is this home was modified and does not meet all the accessibility standards ... but thats just a guess. The additional costs of these items is surprisingly nominal over normal construction, however, to reconvert a fully accessible property may be more expensive.
Very well stated PE. I have appraised and reviewed appraisals of homes that were either modified or built entirely as handicap accessible.

Once had some one tell me I could not use the term "Walk in Closet"(I had put W/I on the sketch). They said it was a violation of the fair housing laws

No problem sez I, what it means then is "Wheel In Closet. Buncha PC idiots in the world today.
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  #7  
Old 11-01-2011, 08:47 AM
Restrain Restrain is offline
 
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The lower switches are being advocated as it helps kids, shorter individuals, etc. The limited changes would, most likely, be a wash as opposed to a truly modified home. Without a paired sale (fuggetaboutit), I would comment, state that there is a lack of data to demonstrate either a positive or negative (unless you truly feel that something here is a negative and you haven't stated one), and move on.
  #8  
Old 11-01-2011, 09:23 AM
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I had a call several years ago from a buyer saying they needed me to appraise their purchase. They wanted me to include the costs of the ramp, widening the interior doors, change bathrooms and lower all the light switches to the report. If I remember correctly, the costs neared 30% of the value of the house. They could not find an appraiser to do this for them :P I wonder why......

Sounds like the op's assignment needs minimal changes. I think the light switches would be a minimal charge, half a day labor for an electrician to move them up. The homeowner could do the drywall patchwork. I have seen no market reaction to wider interior/exterior doors IMM.
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  #9  
Old 11-01-2011, 10:37 AM
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The last time I had a wheel chair modified house for sale in 2009, it was a ranch with an elevator to the basement and full HC suite, it sold in 3 days with 5 bidders. These homes cost more to build, but the market is extremely limited and highly desirable. There's also usually some $$$ in grants, especially if they are an injured vet.
  #10  
Old 11-01-2011, 03:09 PM
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PropertyEconomics PropertyEconomics is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mountain Man View Post
The last time I had a wheel chair modified house for sale in 2009, it was a ranch with an elevator to the basement and full HC suite, it sold in 3 days with 5 bidders. These homes cost more to build, but the market is extremely limited and highly desirable. There's also usually some $$$ in grants, especially if they are an injured vet.

Elevators are very expensive ... but with a new build, barring the elevator, the total additional cost is extremely modest.

I have a friend that has been in a wheel chair since he was 18, he built a new 3,500 square foot house and the TOTAL additional costs to accomodate him including a roll in shower wider doors, grab bars, etc was $5,500 .... there are additional costs but they are very modest as part of new construction.
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