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  #1  
Old 12-15-2012, 12:53 PM
suzy70 suzy70 is offline
 
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Default Fannie Mae guidelines and gross living area access

Does anyone know where in the Fannie Mae guidelines it states that gross living area must have interior access? From what I read in the selling guide it doesn't outline it specifically. We are appraising a home with living area above an attached garage that has access from exterior stairs. It is a large room (used as an office) with a bathroom that has the same level of material and finish work as the home and is fairly typical for our market area. County records value it as GLA. The city is closed today so can't verify what the building permit lists it as. In our opinion, the contributory value would be consistent with that of the GLA. Thank you in advance for your assistance.
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Old 12-15-2012, 01:00 PM
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Marion Rhodes Marion Rhodes is online now
 
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I believe you need the ANSI.

Finished areas above garages are included in the finished square footage that is at the same level in the main body of the house, but only if they are connected to the house by continuous finished areas such as hallways or staircases.
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Old 12-15-2012, 01:02 PM
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http://krec.ky.gov/legal/legal%20doc..._sqfootage.pdf

In the Annex, page 5 of 11.
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Old 12-15-2012, 01:06 PM
suzy70 suzy70 is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marion Rhodes View Post

Tried the link, but it says "page cannot be found"
  #5  
Old 12-15-2012, 01:06 PM
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Originally Posted by suzy70 View Post
..... In our opinion, the contributory value would be consistent with that of the GLA. Thank you in advance for your assistance.
All you have to do now is support your opinion.
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Old 12-15-2012, 01:09 PM
suzy70 suzy70 is offline
 
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Originally Posted by Marion Rhodes View Post
I believe you need the ANSI.

Finished areas above garages are included in the finished square footage that is at the same level in the main body of the house, but only if they are connected to the house by continuous finished areas such as hallways or staircases.

Are the ANSI guidelines gov't regulations?
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Old 12-15-2012, 01:20 PM
leelansford leelansford is offline
 
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Originally Posted by suzy70 View Post
Are the ANSI guidelines gov't regulations?

No.

I would not consider the finished area as GLA.

Given what you have offered--does it matter which way you it as to the value of the property?
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Old 12-15-2012, 01:37 PM
suzy70 suzy70 is offline
 
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Originally Posted by leelansford View Post
No.

I would not consider the finished area as GLA.

Given what you have offered--does it matter which way you it as to the value of the property?

So, if ANSI are just guidelines and FNMA doesn't specifically indicate access, then I guess it is up to us to determine how the sq ft best fits into the market in our area, given that it is a permitted use.

It definitely effects the value as to whether we include it in GLA or as just a line item adjustment because with GLA we would be comparing it to similar GLA properties and the value would be higher than what we can make a separate line item adjustment at.

Last edited by suzy70 : 12-15-2012 at 01:39 PM. Reason: spelling
  #9  
Old 12-15-2012, 01:49 PM
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Marion Rhodes Marion Rhodes is online now
 
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Creating residential square footage is an art and not a science. It
is an extremely complex issue and no one measurement standard
will work in every scenario. The commercial real estate industry
embraces seven measurement "standards." The residential side of the industry is still struggling with two. Although these two "standards" have been used by professionals for over a hundred years, the only name most people have ever heard of is the ANSIŪ standard. ANSI is an excellent reference guide and, when used in its entirety, provides consistent and recreateable measurements. But, for many real estate professionals, they have been taught to measure stairs (and the sloped spaces below) by a different method. Both of these methods provide acceptable measurements for use in appraisals and mortgage lending. The AMSŪ (American Measurement Standard) was created for the group of professionals who do NOT measure stairs by the procedures prescribed in the ANSI Guideline, but still need the protection of following a formal, definable, and defensible if necessary, Standard of Practice. The AMS allows practitioners to say with authority "this is how I measured the house." In the event of any square footage discrepancy, this document offers them the liability protection they need and should be afforded within their industry. Just because they do not adhere completely to the rules of ANSI does not mean they are not just as professional as those who do follow ANSI. It is simply a difference of philosophy that is common throughout the industry, much like the difference in philosophies that brought about the need for seven commercial measurement standards.

The main discrepancy in measurement methods has always centered around the measurement and calculation of stairs, the sloped areas beneath, and the measurement of upper level living areas. The measurement methods contained in the AMS are currently practiced by professional real estate agents, appraisers, and numerous industry leading home builders and architects (i.e., Centex HomesŪ, Donald Gardner Architects, Inc.Ū and by many nationally renowned designers featured on sites such as eplans.comŪ, etc.).

The AMS and its associated principles provide acceptable measurements for the FHA, VA, HUD, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. It is more a standard, not because a particular group or organization has endorsed or adopted its use, but because it is commonly practiced throughout the industry and accepted as a common method of calculating the square footage in single-family homes

http://www.housemeasures.com/Article...-Standard.html


The State of Michigan, requires the ANSI Standards.

http://www.costonappraisal.com/xsite...re_a_house.pdf
  #10  
Old 12-15-2012, 01:59 PM
suzy70 suzy70 is offline
 
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Thanks Marion, that is so true. If there were specific guidelines for everything it would make it a lot more consistent, but it's not a perfect world and we all have our own opinions and ways of doing things. I guess the best we can do is go by market reaction to the additional square footage and value it accordingly. Taking into consideration what the legally permitted use is.
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