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9 Foot Ceilings

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Doug Wegener

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 14, 2005
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Oregon
Believe it or not, I have a query from an AMC reviewer on whether I considered the subject 9 foot ceilings.

Looking at some of the old threads, I see some of the appraiser's (not many) say they see a market difference in their market but one question was never raised.

How on earth would anyone know the height of the ceilings on their comparables?!

In my MLS when I search thru the comments that is hardly ever mentioned.

So if you adjust for that, how do you determine what the height of the ceilings.
 

DTB

Elite Member
Joined
Jun 11, 2004
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Illinois
Believe it or not, I have a query from an AMC reviewer on whether I considered the subject 9 foot ceilings.

Looking at some of the old threads, I see some of the appraiser's (not many) say they see a market difference in their market but one question was never raised.

How on earth would anyone know the height of the ceilings on their comparables?!

In my MLS when I search thru the comments that is hardly ever mentioned.

So if you adjust for that, how do you determine what the height of the ceilings.

I consider them to be one foot higher than an eight foot ceiling. See photo addendum.:cool:
 

AMF13

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 24, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
California
I don't measure ceiling heights.
Very rarely will I say something like "high ceilings".
More likely I say sloping ceilings.
Adjustment? I think not. :rolleyes:
 

Ahhhh Yeahhhh

Junior Member
Joined
Jul 15, 2012
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Georgia
In my market there is a huge difference between an 8 ft ceiling and a 9ft ceilign.

Its difficult to comp, but by knowing the market you will know which subdivisions/which builders built 9ft ceilings and which stayed at 8. Also, look at MLS interior photos. Look at the door ways and look how high above the doorway the ceiling is. Thats the best way to tell. They may have a point. A house with 8ft flat ceilings and a house with 9ft flat ceilings feel completely different.
 

Elliott

Elite Member
Joined
Apr 23, 2002
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
Oregon
Ceiling heights vary by market. A house in the desert SW will have 10 and 12 ceilings which work best with A-C.

More moderate climates will have 8 foot, more efficient to heat.
 

Meandering

Elite Member
Joined
Feb 26, 2006
Professional Status
Real Estate Agent or Broker
State
Pennsylvania
If ceiling height made a "value" difference, Realtors would be advertising this "valuable" amenity in their by-lines that are now being picked up on the internet.

So if they are not mentioned in the MLS, are we saying Realtors don't know how to "sell" their listings?

.
 

Randolph Kinney

Elite Member
Joined
Apr 7, 2005
Professional Status
Retired Appraiser
State
North Carolina
Ceiling height makes a difference on the cost approach as it is more expensive to build a home with 9 foot ceiling height. Standard construction is 8 foot ceiling heights. Homes in the same development will have same construction.
 

Sid Holderly

Senior Member
Gold Supporting Member
Joined
Jun 16, 2005
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Indiana
In rural & small town areas you rarely have comps in the same development. Interior pictures would be the best way to tell and/or exterior wall height perception from the street. Just like deciphering a low ceiling height, not very accurate if you have not seen the interior. Many older lakefront homes have many rooms with low ceilings as they have over the years tried to cabbage all the space possible. The original lots only allowed for building 2 bedroom homes (septic leach field requirement limits). Porches were closed in and incorporated into the living area and have reduced ceiling height. Now that there is a regional sewer system many of these old houses can & have been expanded out and up often with the old limited height rooms still in place. From the outside, it is difficult to tell a modification from total new construction. If any part of an old wall was used the property card still shows the original build date, say 1950, when there was to total rebuild in 2010. Occasionally there are notes in the corner of the property card indicating the remodel date. When you asking the real estate agent they just read off the data from the MLS sheet and property card you already have.

Ceiling height, "quality ?", is only as good as the visual similarity of the comps you find. Adjusting for it separately would be very difficult to pair out in this area.
 

J Grant

Elite Member
Joined
Dec 9, 2003
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Florida
Visual observation...if ceiling height is above average, but one can not even notice it then where is the appeal? Unless an appraiser is so oblivious to their surroundings...

Newer construction (or luxury/unique older construction) offers higher ceilings which can increase appeal. Too high ceilings though loses energy efficiency.

I have only on rare occasion made an individual line adjustment for high ceilings..Usually it is part of quality or appeal . Best to use similar quality/appeal comps , when available .
 

Mr Rex

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 12, 2004
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
North Carolina
Look at the interior photos of the comps. Typical door and window height is 6 foot 8 inches although there are taller custom doors. You can tell the difference by the distance from the top of the door or window to the ceiling. OTOH, I have never adjusted for it.
 
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