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A fun demonstration of how every market is different?

What construction is the majority in your area of the country?

  • Brick

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Stucco

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Hardi or Concrete base

    Votes: 1 100.0%
  • Masonite Siding or other siding

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Wood

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Adobe, for Jo Ann

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    1
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Tim Hicks (Texas)

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Texas
I just got back from a glorious, action packed Disneyworld trip in Florida. I have been there before, but this time my appraiser radar went off. I had noticed before that the stucco home was a big player in this area, but this time I playfully searched for some other type of home while trying not to let my family know I was ignoring them as usual. I gave up. Obviously, I did not tour the entire state, but from my research the entire state of Florida is 99% stucco. I would bet some of you up north never see stucco. I know some parts of the country rarely see full brick exteriors. In Texas, I would venture to say that over 75% (majority) of homes are brick exterior. So here is my poll, please feel free to add your comments or remind me what a total waste of time this is. The point I am trying to make is that every area of the country is different, but so often we don't venture outside our secure little world and realize that it is different elsewhere. That, and what the heck is a cape COD, anyway?
 

Blue1

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 14, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
California
In my area Stucco is the preferred exterior for the newer homes. There are various grades......what I call "sculptured stucco" that's where the stucco is molded around doors and windows, etc. Usually found on up scale homes. Then there are what I call "stucco boxes".....Minimun quality new homes that are all the same and have minimum quality stucco exterior.

"T1-11" (hardboard) is the preferred siding for low quality homes. Then there are some actual plywood "T1-11" and "lap" siding for older upscale homes. Fewer still are the "Batten Board" and "Ship Lap" sided homes. Usually very old homes.
 

John Hassler

Senior Member
Joined
Jul 23, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
California
Need to add "Wood" (wood shingle, board & batt, ship lap, v-groove, etc) to the list of choices. Interesting, though, that "Wood" didnt come to mind while compiling your list. Guess there aren't many in your area.

John Hassler
 

Jo Ann Meyer Stratton

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 16, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Arizona
I am insulted! You don't have the most beautiful, wonderful, greatest type---burnt adobe! My house is constructed of burnt adobe and not furred out inside so that it is exposed and my interior walls are gorgeous. But that isn't the scientific answer you are looking for. The city of Phoenix has prohibited burnt adobe since about 1960. Tucson encourages it and Tubac requires it. Burnt adobe is baked in a kiln just like brick, which turns it alls different shades of red, orange, brown all in the same block, but it is 8" thick, 4" high and 16" long. Since about 1980 almost every house constructed in the Phoenix AZ area (and most of the rest of AZ) have been frame with stucco (I have just learned, it is really EIFS, but everybody calls it stucco and so far because of the dry climate, there hasn't been any problems) with a red tile roof. During the 1960s and 1970, all homes were constructed of slump block, either reddish or grayish in color. Before that it was painted concrete block that was not furred out. Now individually constructed homes are going to the clapboard siding of either vinyl or Hardi board. But because stucco laborers are cheap (they pick them up at Home Depot every morning and pay cash) the developers are staying with stucco frame homes.
 

Chris Harrison

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Utah
Geez Tim, I can't vote.....

The older homes are brick, newer homes upper eco level are brick/stucco, mid eco level are brick or stucco, brick and stucco and siding, lower eco level are vinyl siding and most have full concrete basements....then 20 miles east (Park City area) could have wood, log, stucco, cedar shingle, stucco with the full concrete basement. :roll:

Could you add "all of the above" :lol: :lol:

Chris
(Behind the Zion Curtain)
 

Mike Garrett RAA

Elite Member
Gold Supporting Member
Joined
Jan 14, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Colorado
Stucco is the most popular exterior upgrade in this market and runs from $6,000 to $20,000 more. Tile roofs are also a popular option in higher priced housing.

I visited my sister who was in South Carolina a number of years ago and was amazed at the number of brick homes in the new subdivision. Was told the material and labor was much cheaper in the south.
 

liznindy

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Indiana
We, here in Indiana, get the pleasure of looking at vinyl siding 8O in the majority of new average quality construction. Brick is an upgrade and stucco is rarely seen, unless it is in combination with brick in upscale housing.

Wood siding and aluminum siding is also prevalent.
 

BigBlueGA

Junior Member
Joined
Mar 13, 2002
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
Georgia
I think we're right there with Liz... the majority of new homes in my area are either vinyl or a combination of brick and vinyl siding. Stucco seemed to be popular in the eighties and enjoyed a brief stint in a couple of the upscale neighborhoods for a couple years in the late nineties.
 
W

walt kirk

Guest
In my area, South Jersey, the older houses (some going back to colonial times are brick. Most of the suburban houses built since 1945 are wood frame with some type of siding, asbestos, aluminum or vinyl. Newer high priced houses seem to feature stucco, which makes no sence to me since it's cheaper than good vinyl.
 

Dee Dee

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 16, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Colorado
Around here it's cedar or other wood product siding.
Stucco is popular in the higher end homes (moreso in the city), and new full log usually commands the top buck.
Over the past couple of years the metal roofs have really come into vogue and are considered a nice upgrade, they're more fire resistant.
 
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