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Addition to MH

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Durano Joe

Thread Starter
Junior Member
Joined
Sep 4, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Colorado
Could anyone clarify what is needed when we see an addition on to a MH?
Sometimes it is a 'storage room' or laundry room or even a porch attached.

Is it necessary for an engineer to sign off on it?

Thanks in advance.
 

Midwest Guy

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 12, 2006
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Missouri
Yes, any deck, porch or addition!

Could anyone clarify what is needed when we see an addition on to a MH?
Sometimes it is a 'storage room' or laundry room or even a porch attached.

Is it necessary for an engineer to sign off on it?

Thanks in advance.
 

CANative

Elite Member
Joined
Jun 18, 2003
Professional Status
Retired Appraiser
State
California
Too many things to make a comprehensive list on the forum. But generally, look for things actually attached to the house, supported by the house, new openings into the house, new plumbing, electrical, heating, etc. Things like canopies or deck covers which incorporate the original roof, non-factory room additions, attached garages which were built later on. After market roof systems are very common.

Most of these things require state permits and plan approval in some cases require load testing. The local government (city, county) does not typically have jurisdiction or responsbility for manufactured home post consumer modifications. You should research the laws and codes of your state.

Loads of liability here.
 

Lobo Fan

Elite Member
Joined
Nov 28, 2004
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
New Mexico
Pretty much anything that adds any load to the original structure requires an inspection by a HUD approved structural engineer. This is also true of any exterior wall penetrations, such as doorways or windows. HUD code homes are structurally designed to just barely carry their own loads, let alone anything that could weaken or add load to the original structure. When in doubt, call it out.

Another issue with additions is the capacity of the heater. In most tract quality and HUD code homes, furnaces are sized to the bare minimum it takes to heat the space. Any additional space will likely overload the heat source. another reason to have a professional do the addition instead of a Tim Taylor/Home Depot special.
 

Durano Joe

Thread Starter
Junior Member
Joined
Sep 4, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Colorado
Thanks, good answers.
 

Ray Miller

Elite Member
Joined
Feb 20, 2002
Professional Status
Licensed Appraiser
State
Wisconsin
Good answers all the way around. Be sure and crawl under and check how the unit is strap to the foundation. Found one the other day that was just setting on the blocks and the blocks were loose as well. Some one had just stack them up and put the HUD Code home on it.

On top of that there was a couple of additons. the last appraisal said it was a stick built on s four foot footing. Right. I sent it in with the correct information and I have had four phone calls all ready this morning how I needed to change this and that. If I did not they would need to order a review of my appraisal. I just told them to order the review and I wanted a copy of it. That I was not making any changes. Guess that client is down the drain.
 

Mary Tiernan

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 16, 2003
Professional Status
Retired Appraiser
State
Michigan
If I see one where I question the validity of the addition/renovations, I put this under Are there any physical deficiencies, etc. . .

Additions/renovations to manufactured housing structures can present structural problems if not performed properly. Per the manufactured housing institute /www.manufacturedhousing.org:

"Once your home has left the factory, the HUD Code does not include provisions for additions and alterations. Such modifications may jeopardize your home warranty. They may also create malfunctions or an unsafe home.

An approved addition should be a free-standing structure that meets local building codes, and you may need a construction permit from local authorities."

Then, I describe the questionable renovations and call for a structural engineer.

I found this quote when I was doing a single wide that the owner was renovating. He had removed 75% of the exterior walls, still had the original single wide roof trusses, and had added on to them. Looked crazy.
 
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