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Appraisal Jobs

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Avery Valentine

Thread Starter
Sophomore Member
Joined
Jul 14, 2005
Professional Status
Appraiser Trainee
State
Washington
Hi, I hope this is okay to post here. I recently passed my res certification test, but I'm having a hard time even finding jobs to apply for. I find staff appraiser jobs, which is really what I want, but they all require more experience than I have.

It seems fee appraiser jobs are few right now.

The other option seems to be getting on lists where you do fee appraisals for different companies. I might be willing to try this, but was just wondering what other people may have experienced with these companies? The fee seems a bit low from what I've seen, but maybe there is enough work to make it worth it?

Just wondering here, about the best way to find work. I would really prefer a staff appraiser job, but I'm not sure where to look for one that requires just 2 years of experience!

Thanks!
 

Thomas Fiehler

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 2, 2003
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
Ohio
Avery-Don't take this wrong but I agree that the staff route is best. IMHO, 2 years of experience is not enough to think about opening your own business.
 

Walter Kirk

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 24, 2003
Professional Status
Licensed Appraiser
State
New Jersey
Try subcontracting to established independent appraisers for a while. At one time I subcontracted for four appraisal shops at one time until I opened my own shop. Your exposure to the appraisal market place will help you make contacts which will assist you in finding future jobs.
 

Rrebera

Junior Member
Joined
Jan 21, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Ohio
another profession

Hi, I hope this is okay to post here. I recently passed my res certification test, but I'm having a hard time even finding jobs to apply for. I find staff appraiser jobs, which is really what I want, but they all require more experience than I have.

It seems fee appraiser jobs are few right now.

The other option seems to be getting on lists where you do fee appraisals for different companies. I might be willing to try this, but was just wondering what other people may have experienced with these companies? The fee seems a bit low from what I've seen, but maybe there is enough work to make it worth it?

Just wondering here, about the best way to find work. I would really prefer a staff appraiser job, but I'm not sure where to look for one that requires just 2 years of experience!

Thanks!


Avery:

this may be the worst time to seek work in the appraisal profession. If you have any other skills, electrical, plumbing, etc., it is a great time to head into those careers.
 

Obsolescent

Senior Member
Joined
Jul 6, 2004
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Minnesota
Avery,

Yes it is slow. Try sending your (professional quality) resume to many (and I mean dozens) of REPUTABLE appraisal shops and offer to do split fee work. Stress you are certified and not a trainee. Offer to pick up overflow work or cover a territory when someone else goes on vacation, etc.

I suspect you would be more marketable if you already have your own office, software, E&O, etc. already set up. With only two years of experience (it really takes about five solid years to get comfortable) a split fee situation would allow you to gain more experience while having someone else review your work. Its a matter of getting your foot in the door. Once you get your foot in the door it is ESSENTIAL that you present yourself as a confident professional. Your split fee clients should never have to call you for status. Communicate often, be reliable/dependable...do not make them become your babysitter. Be open and honest about your turn times, your abilities with a quirky assignment and never be shy about asking your split fee client to "banter with you for a moment" BEFORE you take on a troublesome assignment. As your clients gain confidence in your ability to communicate and produce a quality report and you can do it with less handholding than their other split fee appraisers, your name will begin work its way to the top of their list. Eventually, you will pick up your own clients here and there and wean yourself from the split fee clients.

I know some of this sounds elementary, however, having been an office manager who has hired and fired a few people, its amazing how many don't understand these basic principals. People who hire other people either as an employee or consultant want to surround themselves with competent, trustworthy people who take initiative. They don't want to babysit. The PITA is the first one out the door.

my two cents.
Good luck!
 

Flygirl 152

Senior Member
Joined
May 3, 2006
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
California
Avery:

this may be the worst time to seek work in the appraisal profession. If you have any other skills, electrical, plumbing, etc., it is a great time to head into those careers.

This is even a bad time for those professions. The contractors I know have let most of their people go. I know one family of brothers all in the business, one a contractor, another a plumber, and the other tile setters. All 4 of those brothers are out of work!

No one is refinancing to fix their houses up, so just as there has been an oversupply of appraisers, there is now an oversupply of workers in the trades.
 

Avery Valentine

Thread Starter
Sophomore Member
Joined
Jul 14, 2005
Professional Status
Appraiser Trainee
State
Washington
Thank you

Thanks everyone. I really like Judy's idea.

One question - How can I tell who is reputable? Is it looking them up on "bad appraiser" lists, or does it just come with experience?

Thanks for your help!
 

George Hatch

Elite Member
Gold Supporting Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2002
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
California
Most job interviews include the standard "do you have any questions about the company"? query. That's your opportunity to ask some relevant questions.

It's a waste of time to ask an appraiser if they're ethical. Even the most crooked appraiser out there will tell everyone who will listen how ethical and competent they are.

Instead, ask them how the company handles disputes about values. If (I should say "when") a client calls up and starts whining about values, will the company back the appraiser if their opinion is at all reasonable or is their default position to give a client what they want so long as they can get away with it? There's nothing worse for an appraiser than to not have the support of their own company when they're in the right.
 

Don Clark

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Virginia
Most job interviews include the standard "do you have any questions about the company"? query. That's your opportunity to ask some relevant questions.

It's a waste of time to ask an appraiser if they're ethical. Even the most crooked appraiser out there will tell everyone who will listen how ethical and competent they are.

Instead, ask them how the company handles disputes about values. If (I should say "when") a client calls up and starts whining about values, will the company back the appraiser if their opinion is at all reasonable or is their default position to give a client what they want so long as they can get away with it? There's nothing worse for an appraiser than to not have the support of their own company when they're in the right.

Amen to that George. I was, for a very short period of time, a staff appraiser for a very large lender. I was never considered to be right in any dispute. Needless to say, that did not last long.
 

Obsolescent

Senior Member
Joined
Jul 6, 2004
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Minnesota
Thanks everyone. I really like Judy's idea.

One question - How can I tell who is reputable? Is it looking them up on "bad appraiser" lists, or does it just come with experience?

Thanks for your help!

Most of the time you'll be able to pick up on their professionalism based on how they conduct themselves during an interview. Ask them how long they've been in business, how many other appraisers they have, what kind of work flow can you expect, etc. Like George said, ask about how they handle their value disputes.
 
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