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Attached or Detached? Garage that is

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Mary Caffey

Thread Starter
Sophomore Member
Joined
Feb 22, 2002
What constitues an Attached garage- does a breezeway make it attached???


thanks


MNC :?:
 

wyecoyote

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2002
Professional Status
Gvmt Agency, FNMA, HUD, VA etc.
State
Washington
Attached garage has a common wall with the house. Detached garages have their own walls none on the house or structure. Hence it is its own free standing structure.
 

Lee SW IL

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Joined
Jan 15, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Illinois
Attached garage has access to the home without going outside.
Detached garage is a separate structure from the home.

Detached but attached garage has a continuous roof line but no interior access from inside the garage to inside the home.
 

Larry Lyke

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 2, 2002
c21cg --

An attached garage is a garage attached to the house.

Wow, Larry.

Breezeways are attached to the house to which the garage is attached, too. So are decks and porches.
 

Ross (CO)

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Colorado
c21, ..... While you might be attempting to make a call between one type of garage vs. the other, let me say, that I have seen attached garages which have NO direct walk-in access to the house ! Never had it when first built and no owner has ever attempted to cut out a doorway into the house since. What that means is that the driver pulls in to garage, and walks out the front roll-up door and heads to the front door....or walks out a single rear door and goes in some back door to the house. If it's raining that person just may get wet before they are safely inside their house. Yet, in the same neighborhood, some of the comps you select just may have that direct access from inside the "attached" garage. If the subject does NOT have the direct access, then I feel more obligated to be sure to ask that question about my final selected comps. In my description of improvements I am going to comment about the fact that garage is structurally attached yet may be appropriately perceived as being detached, and briefly explain why that is. Breezeways ?, yes they are nice in many regards....and might also be called covered patios .
 

Larry Lyke

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 2, 2002
Ross (CO)--

Amen, but may I offer my opinion, or fine tune it, so to say:

--A breezeway: is a connection between the house and garage. The former may be open, screened or glazed, a combination of the former, or otherwise enclosed; the same criteria of which can be applied to a porch; except a breezeway exists only in physical function if it's connected to other structures at both ends -- Otherwise, it's a porch or deck or you name it.

--A covered patio: used in the matter above would probably not be called a patio as such, primarily because a patio connotes the floor is paved. [Ex.: A covered paved patio in the matter above would probably be called a breezeway.]

I suspect this could be argued differently in different locations, so I'm stopping right here.
 

Ross (CO)

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Colorado
Yes, Larry, your suspicions are warranted, as "they" can be called different things in different locations. The calling of such is usually first done by the listing agent who may put wording in a listing which "misleads". The example directly supporting my comment about breezeway as a "covered patio" is direct commentary by such an agent in a listing. The homeowners walked out of their kitchen side door, into an area with paved concrete floor and protective roofing above. If it rained, they stayed dry. If the sun was out, they were in the shade. It was set up with chairs and the ol' BBQ. This was not behind the house, but between the house and the garage. Wouldn't you know it ....if a breeze was blowing it carried the smoke of dad's burned hot dogs right out into the yard. I guess it is just the way one gets mixed messages between actual functional use and staying-with-the-book. When you say that a breezeway is "connected to other structures at both ends" it makes me ponder some more. I might be inclined to say that a breezeway is connected to other structures on both "sides" with the openings of the breezeway at its ends. Oh, those crazy words we use !
 

Larry Lyke

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 2, 2002
We might call a breezeway an abuttment to the house which connects to another appurtenant structure. Smile.

Oh, the story about agents abusing their authority in disservice to their client. Last month I appraised a property to guide the HO for listing purposes. Upon receipt of the appraisal, the Mrs. called to scold me -- "... the Realtor loved the house and was agog, said it was worth" ... a figure that works out to be 19.46% higher than the appraisal.

Long story shortened. After interviewing Realtors, she listed with that agent ('who bought the listing'). Exactly 10 days later they reduced the listing by -6.12%. The marketplace is around 10 days.

BUT the worst of it, this same very careless Realtor describes the 1.5-story house as a 2-story. Proffers an MLS photo showing a rear profile which tends to highlight an upper level cud-addition which spoiled the original house design (from the rear). Goes on to say how wonderful the interior is, when in fact it's cosmetized late-'70s fuzzed-up and painted natural woodwork and columns.

She paid me at inspection! Life goes on...

Afterwards, I did a CMA on that listing myself and put it in the work file. I assume the Realtor took all the cues the seller gave out.
 
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