• Welcome to AppraisersForum.com, the premier online  community for the discussion of real estate appraisal. Register a free account to be able to post and unlock additional forums and features.

Bathroom Addition Effect To House Value

Status
Not open for further replies.

Matt Dykstra

Freshman Member
Joined
Jul 15, 2003
I am a first time homeowner and loving it. I own a 1450sq ft 2-story house in downtown Lansing, MI. Valued at $96k. I am looking at doubling the size of the main-floor bathroom from 65 sq ft to 130 sq ft. I estimate that this remodeling will cost upwards of $3000. I have been looking every where to see if this will improve the value of my house by at least this much. As I am a first-timer, I know little about how these projects can effect the value of my home. I don't want to go forward with this project without knowing this first. If anyone can offer some advice, I would greatly appreciate it.

Thank you B)
 

George Hatch

Elite Member
Gold Supporting Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2002
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
California
Matt,

What are you planning to do in there, hold a dance? Just kidding. Seriously though, you might ask yourself how badly you need that particular addition. In appraising circles we commonly refer to the old truism that "Cost does not equal value". It's probably very unlikely you'll be able to recover the cost of this addition in the market unless bathroom sizes are a big issue where you live. Think about it, the size of the first floor bath was not a serious enough issue to be a deal killer for you when you bought your house (congratulations on the purchase, by the way). It might have caused you to bid a little lower on your sale price, but probably not by much.

Truth to tell, you might not recover any of the cost in your market; it's hard for us to know without looking at the data. The best reason to add onto your home is because you want the addition and are figuring on sticking around long enough to get your use out of it. In other words, do the addition if it makes you happy, but don't count on being rewarded by a future buyer for it. Hope this answers your question. Good luck.
 

Restrain

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 22, 2002
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
Florida
Quick rule of thumb. The typical buyer desires a large Master Bath and a utilitarian 2nd bath. If you are planning to enlarge the Master Bath and it does not adversely affect the Master Bedroom, then MAYBE you will recover the cost. Again, however, it all depends on your particular market.

Roger
 

Richard J. Glesser

Junior Member
Joined
May 16, 2002
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
Michigan
A typical bath is similar in size to what you presently have. The additional size could make the bath more spacious, possibly adding a separate shower from the tub or a double vanity. If you just purchased the home and not for investment as a renovation project, then any improvements made should, within reason, improve your livability within the house. Do you feel the bathroom is small and cramped? If so, for $3,000, redo it. Sorry to say, but as home improvements go, $3,000 is a drop in the bucket. Be careful in improving the home that you don't do something so personal that it loses its mass appeal. Once appraised a home which had a dining room off the kitchen in a bay area of the home adjacent to the front door entry. They installed a hot tub in the previous dining room. Beautifully done, raised with ceramic wainscot and flooring, but....who wants to sit in a hot tub between your kitchen, entry, and living room which is surrounded by windows? In addition, you must pass through one of those rooms to get to a bathroom or to change. From an appraisal standpoint and also a marketing standpoint as they later sold the home, this created functional obsolescence based upon a poor floorplan which obviously suited the owners perfectly, but didn't appeal to the masses for the above stated reasons.

Good luck on your renovations and home ownership. :usa:
 

John Hassler

Senior Member
Joined
Jul 23, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
California
Hi Matt

All markets are different but, to me, your current bath size appears of adequate size given the overall footage of your home. If the space you are expanding into is currently underutilized it might make economic sense (using the dead area under a staircase for example). If you are stealing space from another room to make the bath bigger you may actually lose value beacuse the other room may become undersize by your markets standards. Personally, I don't think the hall bath is the first place I would put money into unless it needs attention.

John Hassler

BTW, $3000 seem very low considering I remodeled my 5'x9' (45 sq ft) bath in 1990 and it cost $8,000 with me doing a quarter of the work.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Find a Real Estate Appraiser - Enter Zip Code

Copyright © 2000-, AppraisersForum.com, All Rights Reserved
AppraisersForum.com is proudly hosted by the folks at
AppraiserSites.com
Top

AdBlock Detected

We get it, advertisements are annoying!

Sure, ad-blocking software does a great job at blocking ads, but it also blocks useful features of our website. For the best site experience please disable your AdBlocker.

I've Disabled AdBlock
No Thanks