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Best way to keep printer paper dry in a damp climate?

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Joined
Jan 15, 2002
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Certified Residential Appraiser
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Florida
In this part of Florida, about this time of year, the in-home office temparture is just about right. No need to run the AC 24/7. Result is very damp air. My printer (HP 2100) will sometimes grab 5 or more sheets at a time, and then jamb.

Drying by microwave works fine. Drives all moisture out. (Cought on fire, one time). Warming section of range/oven works, too. Several years ago, I built a drying box with a night-light bulb as a heat source. It worked fine. Was cardboard and finally fell apart.

I suspect running the AC all the time is the only practical solution. Any bright ideas out there?
 

Will Trueheart

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Feb 18, 2003
Don't know if this would work for you but how about a large airtight storage box that would hold a case of paper?
 

Farm Gal

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Jan 14, 2002
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Licensed Appraiser
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Nebraska
Thomas:

I have in the past collected a large quantity of those little sacs tossed into showboxes and electronics equipment cases... when heated in a oven to dispell all stored liquid, and then tossed into a fairly airtight plastic container they tend to hold moisture down in paper stored therein

You CAN buy 'heat sticks' , pricy and energy suckers...

OR do more or less what you accomplished with your carboard/light combination, placeing a a 60 watt bulb SAFELY away from the paper products ( I made a 'box' outof pegboard) in a enclosed container of cardboard, wood or pressboard, will in a less expensive manner accomplish about the same goal.

Other tips, store non-secured paper products as high off the floor as you can, moisture at floor level tends to be higher.
Plastic boxes tend to 'wick IN moisure as pressures change... pressboard boxes seal 'well enough' to do a better job unless you have a life collection of those little sacs to toss in. :wink:
 

Jeff Horton

Senior Member
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Jan 15, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Alabama
If your paper gets damp in an unopened pack then this might not be that good an idea. But I was thinking a large freezer or zip lock bag. Just put a newly opened pack of paper in the plastic bag maybe?
 

BarbaraNJ

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Jan 15, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
New Jersey
Just to "piggy back" on Lee Ann's comment....

Hardware stores 'round here sell small (about the size of a letter envelope) burlap-type bags filled with a material similar to that which is sprinkled on oil spots on concrete to dry them up.

The typical application is to hang a bag or two in a closet to keep clothes dry.

You could put one of these bags into your case of paper or within the drawer or closet where the paper is kept.

When the "bag" gets damp from soaking up moisture, you place it in an oven to remove the dampness and just re use it.

The only place this won't work is when the paper is actually in your printer. The only suggestion I have for this is to keep only the amout in the tray that you are using. A pain in the neck, esp. having to re load all the time.

Good Luck !!!
 

Ross (CO)

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Colorado
Tom, ......You could move to a state in the Mountain Time Zone ! Humidity simply has not adapted well to our higher elevations out here. Greetings, from 6,840 feet.
 

Mike Garrett RAA

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Jan 14, 2002
Professional Status
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Colorado
My indoor weather stations says humidity is about 25%, no problem here at 6,172. I did find it better to keep the paper in my office and not in the garage.
 

Richard Carlsen

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Joined
Jan 15, 2002
Professional Status
Licensed Appraiser
State
Michigan
Actually, running the AC only a few hours a day may be enough to cut the humidity enough to help the paper. That would be my first choice to try.

If you don't want to run the AC, a small dehumidifier in a small, fairly tight room might do the trick.
 

Richard Carlsen

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2002
Professional Status
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State
Michigan
BTW, I think in such a warm situation you need some additional on-site advice. I'll just pack my fishing rod and some shorts and be down in 2 days.
 
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