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Career Fair

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KD247

Thread Starter
Senior Member
Joined
Jan 24, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
California
As a an upstanding member of the community (hah!), I've been asked to man a desk at a high school's career fair. The purpose of the fair is to expose graduating students to varied career alternatives.

The most positive spin I can crank out for our goofy business is: "If you continue on with your education and develop basic skills in communication, logic, technology, and marketing - you will have a much better chance of writing your own job description and setting your own hours".

Please, does anyone have anything to pass on to our youth that is more concrete than my meaningless drivel? I really would like to add something of value to the occasion.
 

Dee Dee

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 16, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Colorado
Tell them that they will travel and see places that they never dreamed of in their wildest imaginations. And it pays better than the Army, Air Force, Navy or Marines.
Juuuust kidding. :lol:
 

Kathy in FL

Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2002
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
Florida
You can tell them that they have all of the responsibilities of a corporate bigwig...and the perks...company cell phone, car, setting their own hours, three hour lunch breaks, screaming at their clients, deciding the future and direction of a company...and the pay of a senior cashier at Circle K.

But it's a good life, isn't it?

Kathy in FL
 

KD247

Thread Starter
Senior Member
Joined
Jan 24, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
California
Ok you guys,

111 people have viewed this question and only two smart-*** answers? Please, I really would like to offer these kids some insight about the future potential of our profession.

Come on, we're professional writers trained to provide unbiased overviews.

So far, it looks like the message is "The job may not exist in a couple of years, but for the time being there's the potential to work hard and make a lot of money with very little job satisfaction or prestige."

Is appraising even a realistic professional goal anymore?
 

Austin

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 16, 2002
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
Virginia
Koert: You had better ease off that part about “logic and technology” are you might end up with a gaggle of “Austin” clones on your hands. Then you would waste half of your work day debating with the idiots and it wouldn't be anymore of this ten against one stuff! :lol:
 

xmrdfghap

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2002
Professional Status
General Public
State
Florida
<span style='color:brown'>Job prospects: The appraisal profession is changing rapidly. The kinds of appraisals done in years past where you could put the information on a postcard and give it (sometimes just call it in) to the brother-in-law banker is long past. But as long as two people disagree on what a property is really worth there will be a need for an unbiased opinion backed by verifiable data.

Liability will continue to be an issue. When a party offers expert opinions and those opinions are substantially wrong, the person hiring that party is going to want someone to blame......and sue.

Cookie cuttter homes will soon be relegated to "bluebook" type valuations..........just like cars..........but unique properties, complex properties, commercial properties, single purpose buildings, litigation, condemnation, estate, tax, all will require valuations performed by reputable professional people. I also see a future in pre-sale or buyers/sellers appraisals for those who wisely seek a realistic value prior to putting a house on the market or prior to making an offer on a property.


Education: Academically, real property appraisers need the broadest possible education. Among the essentials is a knowledge of real estate, financing, credit, cost analysis, construction materials, methods, & techniques (both historical and contemporary), architectural styles and trends (the list is inclusive, not exclusive). Additionally the future appraiser will need the experience and knowledge to accurately forcast future growth of communities, the impact of such growth on existing development, and the ability to accurately and clearly communicate the results of research and the development of conclusions.

This is in addition to specialites that you might want to explore. Farm appraising requires a knowledge of animal husbandry, farming economics, land use, soil analysis, current trends in crop and animal production...again the list is almost endless. Condemnation requires knowledge of state and federal condemnation laws as well as almost everything a farm, commmercial, industrial, and residential appraiser has to know.


Experience: Working in construction a couple of summers, selling real estate, working for a closing company, working as a loan officer, working for a title company, anything to do with land........any or all of the above.


Is appraising a dying career? Only if doing homes for loan officers in subdivisions of identical houses is your idea of a career. Otherwise the diversity of work, the combination of office and field work, remaining on the cutting edge of technology, staying current with trends as diverse as plant openings/closings to Austrailian droughs to weather cycles will keep the most ADD ridden happily and profitably engaged. One other side benefit........only you can determine how much money you will make and how much time you take off.......as an appraiser you will never have to miss a childs soccer match, a Boy Scout campout or meeting, or miss your daughters dance recital (unless you want to).......it is your call, and it is your life to control and your future to determine.

Appraising in the next century will be an awesome challenge, an excellent adventure, and the last repository of stubbornly independent people.</span>
 

Roger

Junior Member
Joined
Jan 24, 2002
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
Missouri
Greg,

I think that is the first of your posts, that I can completely agree with!!
 

KD247

Thread Starter
Senior Member
Joined
Jan 24, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
California
Greg,

Thanks for the insightful post. Some time ago I mentioned that it would be nice to save some of these "milestone" posts in a FAQ of some sort. Your post would certainly qualify as one that should be a ready reference for all appraisers coming to this forum.

Austin, bring on the clones! Just because it's ten against one doesn't mean we want to see the extinction of your species. The best part of this profession is that there are different ways of viewing the every problem. And we may all be eating crow if USPAP 2005 has a strong emphasis on regression analysis.
 

Ben Vukicevich SRA

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 9, 2002
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
New Jersey
Greg,

Great post with good info for the beginners.

I tried a career day years ago. The only problem is; no one ever trained them to read a map in grade school or high school so they can't get to the property or find the comps.

When I said you had to be able to read road maps, flood maps, tax maps, census tract maps, they just all kind of floated away. Too much thinking, I guess.

Ben
 
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