• Welcome to AppraisersForum.com, the premier online  community for the discussion of real estate appraisal. Register a free account to be able to post and unlock additional forums and features.

College degree?

Do you have a college degree?

  • Yes

    Votes: 1 50.0%
  • No

    Votes: 1 50.0%

  • Total voters
    2
Status
Not open for further replies.

BigBlueGA

Thread Starter
Junior Member
Joined
Mar 13, 2002
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
Georgia
Just out of curiousity sparked by the discussion about having a college degree to be a licensed appraiser... how many of us here have college degrees?
 

Jo Ann Meyer Stratton

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 16, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Arizona
I am finally going to have to join one of the discussions about degrees (every chat room is having a heated discussion about the topic). I can see and understand a requirement for a college degree but there also needs to be a substitute for a degree. Not everyone is fortunate enough to have the opportunity to attend college. And there are many valid reasons of why a person did not have the chance. Those people sometimes go on to have a PhD in the college of hard knocks. My college was of the hard knocks, but I am still working on my associate degree! I went to a one room school with eight students, attended a high school with 80 students and my father considered that a waste of time because I was a girl, girls did not need to be educated. By pure luck fell into appraising 35 years ago. And my road has been differant, challanging, interesting and most important-fun! I have held three professionsal designations, one is now retired so currently hold two. Each application was an interesting experience that I do not reqret one iota! When I applied for the RES designation with the IAAO, I had to prove 5 years experience because I lacked a degree. Provided the proof, then spent two years writing a demonstration report, taking exams, acquiring more experience and became the 10th woman in the world be receive the designation. Then onward and upward to the NAIFA, which accepted all my experience and education but again I had to write a demonstration report before earning my Member designation of IFA. Later at an employers insistence applied for the SRA with the old Society of Real Estate Appraisers. They accepted the demonstration report that had been prepared for the IAAO and the NAIFA, but had to challenge their exams (which I did) and prove again five years (after being in the business 18 years by then) experience because I lacked that college degree. So my opinion is there needs to be some type of experience requirement in lieu of a college degree. Because even in this modern age, there are people who just do not have the opportunity for college. My son is 31 and just now enrolled in college after 10 years of the college of hard knocks. My daughter at the age of 37 went back to college and earned her bachelors degree in education in 18 months and now teaching special education students in a high school. Another daughter has been taking engineering courses for 20 years, works for the city of Phoenix reviewing and overseeing registered engineers. But because she has not had the time to take courses in PE or English or ancient History cannot get a degree or become registered herself. But because of her experience, on the job knowledge, and engineering courses is more knowledgable and capable than many registered engineers with degrees. So a college degree is nice, important, usefull but not the final word!
 

Chad J. Houser

Freshman Member
Joined
Jan 31, 2002
Professional Status
Licensed Appraiser
State
Georgia
I haven't posted a reply on the other thread yet, but while reading some of the other posts I wondered how many of those for and against the degree requirement hold a degree. That, and a main reason for their position would be interesting reading, don't you think?. Perhaps those questions should be added to this poll.
 

Caterina Platt

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
New Mexico
Ok Chad,

I'll take your bait. First off, those of us already in the profession would be grandfathered as I understand. So arguing one way or the other if you're already an appraiser isn't necessarily done to save your own bacon.

For the record, I have 2 1/2 years of the study completed towards a double major in Agri Business Management and Horticulture. (20 years ago, a dream of owning a thriving nursery/greenhouse. Decided I didn't want to be a starving semi-farmer type afterall) Not highly useful for an appraiser, although I do find some of the soils and chemistry courses loosely applicable. The economics courses I took have definitely helped when looking at my market drivers and indicators. Maybe the Botany book would come in handy for this toxic mold issue. Given the chance, I'd love to finish out and focus on economics and, (gulp)statistics. Right now, it's Hubby's turn to finish. He has about a year left. Maybe after our youngest is in school and we've digested some of his hefty student loans.......
 

BigBlueGA

Thread Starter
Junior Member
Joined
Mar 13, 2002
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
Georgia
Jo Ann, how hard is it to go back to school? I only completed a year of college, and I would really like to go back and finish it, but I am afraid to jump into that. I would think that tuition would be pretty expensive (and the bills still need to be paid) and the time required would eat up every bit of off-work time I have.. what is your experience with this?
 

Jo Ann Meyer Stratton

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 16, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Arizona
The son is starving--but determined to graduate, only one year to go. But he is single, no family to starve also, working part time jobs to pay the rent, buy groceries and pay tution at a community college. The daughter/teacher had a husband at that time encourage her to go to college, since she did it in 18 months through a mentor program, she was at school or studying from 6AM to 11PM. He supported her and she took out education loans, which she will be repaying for years. The daughter/semi-engineer takes courses that her employer pays for if it is related to her job, other courses are at her own expense. She works full time, has twin sons, is a den mother, and so it comes out to one class a semester--and few that she can afford on her own, the reason for the lack of ancient history or PE classes. So the main thing is determination and the desire to learn--although a source of income sure does help! Daughter #1 went to a two year college than finished at a four year college directly out of high school using grants and scholarships, and then couldn't find a job for three years, but now doing very well. Daughter #5 graduated from a two year community college then went to another two year community college in WA (we are in AZ) to specialize in her field. That was part time jobs, savings and help from parents to achieve, but she is also doing very well. Now if I just could get the son in laws and daughter #4 to go to college! They are only in their forties--so there is still hope!! Working on the grandkids now too--been whispering in their ear since they were born--you WILL go to college. But so far it doesn't seem like it worked, although one is going to a trade school using a large loan that will take her the rest of her life to pay off. But if she ends up in a career she enjoys and can earn a living (after paying off the education loan) that will be great. So if you can figure out the income--go for it, at the age of 66 I am still saying someday I will make it to college! Community colleges are inexpensive and can sometimes offer better courses than the four year universities and usually will transfer to the university. The University of Phoenix (I think is a national chain of private colleges) have courses and times that are compatiable with working adults. An ex son in law earned his masters degree that way.
 

Austin

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 16, 2002
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
Virginia
Just read some of the above post and it seems the question is: Is a college degree necessary to be an appraiser? In my experience, the answer is yes and no. Yes if you take the right courses and no if you don’t. I graduated from a major university in 1968, with a BS degree in economics. Everything I studied related to appraising and real estate. Law, economics, statistics, etc., I couldn’t have done it without this background.
On the other hand, some of the most successful people I know only completed HS, especially in the banking field.
Now for the no answer: If you go to college and study in the college of arts and humanities, you might as well spend your time sitting in the sand making sand castles. We usually go to Disney World at least once a year and my favorite show is the Hump Back of Norte Dame because the warm-up act is a juggler. He explains that the way he got into juggling was that he went to college and was in the college of arts and humanities and had plenty of extra time on his hands, so he took up juggling. Then he went to graduate school in arts and humanities and took up show business and various other juggling and related tricks because then he really had a lot of extra time on his hands. Then when he graduated from graduate school in arts and humanities, he couldn’t get a job so he went into show business. He said the head of the Florida unemployment commission was named "Art Majors."
 

Charlotte Dixon

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 16, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Delaware
Spielberg to graduate from college

Director says getting his degree is ‘thank you’ to his parents

By Sarah Tippit


LOS ANGELES (Variety), May 14 — He’s won Oscars and his films have made millions upon millions of dollars and now — after what he calls the “longest post-production schedule” of his life — Steven Spielberg is going to achieve an honor that has eluded him: He is going to graduate from college. Spielberg, 55, says he will graduate from California State University at Long Beach, with a major in film and electronic arts, on May 31, more than three decades after dropping out to pursue his now legendary Hollywood career.


Just shows to go 'ya...
 

Blue1

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 14, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
California
So......if we all get college degrees.........we'll all be just like lawyers......right?
 

Dee Dee

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 16, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Colorado
Although I encourage my sons to go to college, I have to admit that the most successful people that I know never went to college, or never pursued the professions they majored in.
Strong work ethics and a healthy dose of common sense seem to be what counts the most. Those traits are better attributed to a good upbringing and genetics than from education.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Find a Real Estate Appraiser - Enter Zip Code

Copyright © 2000-, AppraisersForum.com, All Rights Reserved
AppraisersForum.com is proudly hosted by the folks at
AppraiserSites.com
Top

AdBlock Detected

We get it, advertisements are annoying!

Sure, ad-blocking software does a great job at blocking ads, but it also blocks useful features of our website. For the best site experience please disable your AdBlocker.

I've Disabled AdBlock
No Thanks