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Complex Property

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Tom Giraldin

Freshman Member
Joined
Jul 7, 2003
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
California
What is the difinition of a complex property and resources for difintions
 

Don Clark

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Virginia
The only definition I have found is in FIRREA.

However, if the style, size, configuration, or the complexity of the assignment is out of the norm, I consider it to be a complex property. Example, I appraised a 200 year old brick one story building used for a COMMERCIAL PURPOSE(Arts & Craft Store). It had a new(less than 10 year old) 2 story residential property built on to it. This was allowable under a special zoning ordinance to try and improve the area. I considered that to be complex as I had to do a Narrative on the commercial, a URAR on the residential, then bring the 2 values together for a final opinion. No one ever questioned my opinion.

Don
 

Tom Giraldin

Freshman Member
Joined
Jul 7, 2003
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
California
Thank-you Don and what is the address for FIRREA, could you post a link?
 

Fred

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2002
Professional Status
Retired Appraiser
State
Virgin Islands
Tom,
I don't think you will find a formal def for that one.
 

Farm Gal

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 14, 2002
Professional Status
Licensed Appraiser
State
Nebraska
Complex property can also be one which is outside an individual's area of competency...

What is the basis for your inquiry?

We need the scope :rolleyes:
 

Patrick Egger

Sophomore Member
Joined
May 29, 2003
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
Nevada
Tom ... I think you"ll find some here

FIRREA - complex defined

The key is to remember that FIRREA just set the frame work for the ASB, ASQ and each of the states later set state level rules, reg's including definitions.

The term "complex" seems to be subjective in the various readings I've been through ... you may find something on your state website ...

From experience ... its something out of the ordinary that makes the assignment complex ... and not just the price or size, etc. As a example, a typical tract type home that has been remodeled to include atypical features such as an indoor pool or perhaps a 3 story home in an all single story neighborhood ... or a single family home on a large site that could be subdivided, creating a H & B use issue ... any of these could be considered complex and may require the services of a certified appraiser.

The intent by the FEd was to ensure that complex properties were appraised by more experienced appraisers ... it hasn't turned out that way I suspect.
 

Restrain

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 22, 2002
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
Florida
How dissimilar is the property (large custom in an area of tract homes), unique (ICF construction), value and construction quality (high site value or high-dollar materials and design), or amenities (horse ranch with barns, etc).

For example, I have a home that has 3600 square feet. That in and of itself is not a complex appraisal. However, the home has cut-stone exterior, some cut-stone interior walls, beamed cathedral ceilings with v-notch wood, copper countertops with slab cedar bar-top, and cut limestone slab bath countertops. The design and appeal makes this a unique and complex property.

ROger
 

Tejus

Member
Joined
Nov 1, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Texas
I spoke with my State Appraisal Board on this earlier today. They define a "complex" assignment as an assignment in which all valuation methods are used. The Board rep further stated most residential appraisals do not use all valuation methods.

Don't flame me, I'm only the messenger.
 

Tawfik Ahdab

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 19, 2003
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Oregon
In Oregon, the State board povides a poor definition but a reasonabley good descrpition of complex properties. The "Defintions" section of the Admisntrative Rules (161-002-0000 item #12) defines:

Complex one-to-four family residential property appraisal" means an appraisal in which the property to be appraised, market conditions, or form of ownership is atypical. For example, atypical factors may include, but are not limited to:

(a) Architectural style;

(B) Age of improvements;

© Size of improvements;

(d) Size of lot;

(e) Neighborhood land use;

(f) Potential environmental hazard liability;

(g) Property interests;

(h) Limited readily available comparable sales data; or

(i) Other unusual factors.

The above provide reasonably good indicators of complexity, even though just one of these items, say, size of lot, does not necessarily render the property complex.
 

Fred

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2002
Professional Status
Retired Appraiser
State
Virgin Islands
The older I get, the more I feel like Justice Potter Stewart who said, I can't define it, but I know it when I see it. :D

As a cert gen, if I had to draw a line, the first swipe would be that if the subject is a whole property in fee simple and the valuation date is nearby, it is probably not complex.
 
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