• Welcome to AppraisersForum.com, the premier online  community for the discussion of real estate appraisal. Register a free account to be able to post and unlock additional forums and features.

Everyone's jumping on mold testing

Status
Not open for further replies.

Restrain

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 22, 2002
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
Florida
Saw a home mold test kit for sale at Lowe's today. Buy, swab and send in. At least it gives you an idea of what you are dealing with and may save you the expensive of a professional environmental exam. Of course, if it comes back with one of the bad molds, then you are put on notice.
 

Ross (CO)

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Colorado
I guess any homeowner can run a test for mold but I really wonder if this test can be performed satisfactorily enough to isolate the pathogenic mold from the non-pathogenic stuff. There are radon test kits and lead paint test kits and formaldehyde test kits on store shelves too. Most might just show a presence-of the substance. At the consumer-use and consumer-priced levels do such tests have the weight or merit to be used against an appraiser who may have "missed" these aspects during our visit to the property and viewing of readily-observed aspects ? If not tested by a guy in a white lab coat, with a PhD on the wall and a State-issued license, then such a test may not have much credibility. We usually might introduce our appropriate disclaimer comments when we note potential of concern like visible mold (multi-colored gunk) or lead-paint (chipping and age of house) or radon (because it is known in the area). What's to stop someone from swabbing the mold on the bread or cheese in their refrigerator, or the basic dirt and crud build-up in the shower or tub, just to see what the test results are ? I guess they can test anything they desire. It sure does help the bottom line at the Lowe's store !
 

Jim McGrath

Junior Member
Joined
Jan 25, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Florida
Saw a home mold test kit for sale at Lowe's today. Buy, swab and send in. At least it gives you an idea of what you are dealing with and may save you the expensive of a professional environmental exam. Of course, if it comes back with one of the bad molds, then you are put on notice.

A little knowledge can be a dangerous thing, it can get you into a heap of trouble.

Only some types of mold can be tested with a swab, others require a capture of the mold in the air, which requires different tests. All tests require expert knowledge of what you are doing. Home mold test kit are an example of a company trying to cash in on a problem, and are not to be trusted.

Some mold sites are;
http://www.medallionhealthyhomes.com/

Another with limited information is.
http://hometest.com/

Jim
 

Elliott

Elite Member
Joined
Apr 23, 2002
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
Oregon
As I am fond of saying in my reports,

"The appraiser is not expert in matters of dryrot, mold spores, pest control, structural engineering, roofing, survey, environmental liability, plumbing, heating, electrical, or appliances. No expertise or warranty is implied in these or other areas. If the user of the report has concerns about these or other areas, a qualified expert should be consulted."

Mold spore, what's a mold spore??

elliott
 

Jim McGrath

Junior Member
Joined
Jan 25, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Florida
As I am fond of saying in my reports,

"The appraiser is not expert in matters of dryrot, mold spores, pest control, structural engineering, roofing, survey, environmental liability, plumbing, heating, electrical, or appliances. No expertise or warranty is implied in these or other areas. If the user of the report has concerns about these or other areas, a qualified expert should be consulted."

Mold spore, what's a mold spore??

elliott

Elliot, dryrot is another area where many appraisers are lacking in knowledge. Here in Florida wetrot is a common problem, but most appraisers call it dryrot. They have different causes and cures. In 25+ years of appraising I have seen only one real case of dryrot in this area, but I see lots of wetrot almost every day. Dryrot is somewhat difficult to determine, but with a little work you can.

It is unfortunate, that our CE classes contain so much redunant information, and fail to teach appraisers something they can use everyday. It is not necessary to become an expert, but they should learn enough to keep them out of trouble.

Jim
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Find a Real Estate Appraiser - Enter Zip Code

Copyright © 2000-, AppraisersForum.com, All Rights Reserved
AppraisersForum.com is proudly hosted by the folks at
AppraiserSites.com
Top

AdBlock Detected

We get it, advertisements are annoying!

Sure, ad-blocking software does a great job at blocking ads, but it also blocks useful features of our website. For the best site experience please disable your AdBlocker.

I've Disabled AdBlock
No Thanks