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FHA electrical guidelines.

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robertwells

Thread Starter
Sophomore Member
Joined
Jul 13, 2006
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
California
Hi Experts,

What is the latest to look for when inspecting for FHA...specifically the electrical system. I have an older home in Oakland, and just wondering.

Thanks!

Bob
 

CANative

Elite Member
Joined
Jun 18, 2003
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
California
Mechanical Systems
Report on the condition of the improvements, which includes mechanical systems. The nature and
degree of any noted deficiency will determine whether to address the deficiency in the narrative
comments area of the report under “condition of the property”, or “physical deficiencies” affecting
livability or structural soundness.

Check mechanical, plumbing and electrical systems in the subject property to ensure that they are in
proper working order. This examination entails turning on the applicable systems and observing their
performance. If any conditions exist that would affect the health or safety of the occupants, condition
the appraisal on the repair or alteration of the condition” and/or a “required inspection.” The following
is not an all-inclusive list, but a listing of the more common readily observable property deficiencies.

Electrical System
• Examine the electrical system to ensure that there is no visible frayed wiring, or exposed wires in
living areas and note if the amperage appears adequate for the property.
• Operate a representative number of lighting fixtures, switches and receptacles inside the house,
garage and on the exterior walls and note any deficiencies. If the appliances present at the time
of the inspection do not appear to be reasonable (undersized), determine if there is adequate
amperage to run “standard” appliances, as per local code.
• The appraiser is not required to insert any tool, probe or testing device inside the panels or to
dismantle any electrical device or control
 

robertwells

Thread Starter
Sophomore Member
Joined
Jul 13, 2006
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
California
Thanks, Can!
 

CANative

Elite Member
Joined
Jun 18, 2003
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
California
No, thank Appendix D to HUD Handbook 4150.2

:)
 

mark hurlock

Senior Member
Joined
Jul 4, 2006
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Delaware
Mechanical Systems
Report on the condition of the improvements, which includes mechanical systems. The nature and
degree of any noted deficiency will determine whether to address the deficiency in the narrative
comments area of the report under “condition of the property”, or “physical deficiencies” affecting
livability or structural soundness.

Check mechanical, plumbing and electrical systems in the subject property to ensure that they are in
proper working order. This examination entails turning on the applicable systems and observing their
performance. If any conditions exist that would affect the health or safety of the occupants, condition
the appraisal on the repair or alteration of the condition” and/or a “required inspection.” The following
is not an all-inclusive list, but a listing of the more common readily observable property deficiencies.
Can,

how do you determine if there is adequate amperage to run “standard” appliances, as per local code?
 

Tom Woolford

Elite Member
Gold Supporting Member
Joined
Nov 20, 2005
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Florida
Can,

how do you determine if there is adequate amperage to run “standard” appliances, as per local code?
Look at the main breaker. 100 amp service is pretty well inadequate for any home these days. 150 is iffy, 200 standard around here.
 

mark hurlock

Senior Member
Joined
Jul 4, 2006
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Delaware
Look at the main breaker. 100 amp service is pretty well inadequate for any home these days. 150 is iffy, 200 standard around here.
Thanks tom but I want to know how can does it. He left that part out.
 

mark hurlock

Senior Member
Joined
Jul 4, 2006
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Delaware
We are not the "code police"!
I agree. There are private and municipal authorities who are responsible for code enforcement. But the guideline posted by Can was specific to adequate amperage services and I want to know how Can makes such a determination.

He is the expert and I am questioning his particular expertise in this case.
 

Tom Woolford

Elite Member
Gold Supporting Member
Joined
Nov 20, 2005
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Florida
Thanks tom but I want to know how can does it. He left that part out.
Excuse me. I thought I was offering useful information. Guess I was mistaken.
 
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