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FHA Scope of Work

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Anthem

Thread Starter
Senior Member
Joined
Mar 10, 2004
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
North Carolina
I am working on my SOW template for FHA work and am trying to decide if I should stay with what I have.

I am wondering if I should get more detailed and add stuff like:

The appraiser tested a representative number of power outlets with a night light,

The appraiser opened a representative number of windows etc etc.

On one hand I feel like at some point saying to much is not good and on the other hand I like detailing exactly what I have done.

Thoughts?
 

fritzvogel

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 16, 2004
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
New York
Say LESS, If your on the Roster, you have an obligation to due certain things. If it's in "Black and White" on a report and you end up in COURT with a disgruntaled HO, then you have very little defence. How many H.O. or lawyers do you know will READ and understand the FHA guidelines for a small or frivolis (sp) lawsuit?
 

Marcia Langley

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 26, 2005
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Missouri
Preston,

I describe what I did and did not do during my viewing of the subject property but there is no reason it has to be overly lengthy.

By writing in the first person and combining some tasks into one sentence you can keep it short.

"I opened one window per bedroom, checked power availability in one outlet per room, operated all utility systems, performed a head and shoulder viewing of the attic and crawl space, checked water pressure ..."


"I did not move personal property, snow, ice, leaves, etc. ..."

Tell the story but be concise.
 

Anthem

Thread Starter
Senior Member
Joined
Mar 10, 2004
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
North Carolina
I can relate to being less liable by not saying too much and saying much ....

This is a toss up for me.

Many respected teachers, SRA's etc are not stating they tested lights, outlets etc.
 

TXCBoy36

Junior Member
Joined
Oct 3, 2007
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Colorado
Are you just adding an addendum to supplement you SOW?

JC
 

CURT VAN HOOSER

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 3, 2003
Professional Status
Licensed Appraiser
State
California
Can't you just say, "Inspected in accordance with HUD guidelines," and keep the results of your inspection in the workfile?

I do like Marcia's comment..."I did not move personal property, snow, ice, leaves, etc. ..."
 

Jo Ann Meyer Stratton

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 16, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Arizona
This is the paragraph I have in all my reports as part of my Scope of Work on page 3.

"A physical observation of the property was performed of the unobstructed, exposed surfaces of accessible exterior and interior areas of all structures without removal of personal possessions by the appraiser. Exterior and interior photos were taken for the appraiser's work file with photos of significant items included in this report. Although due diligence was exercised while visiting the subject property, the appraiser is not an expert in such matters as identification of mold, lead based paint, pest control, structural engineering, hazardous waste, soil slippage, waste disposal system integrity, electrical-plumbing-roof-foundation systems, etc and the appraiser assumes no responsibility for those items. Mold may or may not be present in areas the appraiser could not readily observe. The presence of lead based paint and contamination cannot be ruled out based on subject age. If the client has any questions regarding these items, it is the client's responsibility to order the appropriate inspections with the final opinion of market of value being subject to a licensed professional's findings."
 

Anthem

Thread Starter
Senior Member
Joined
Mar 10, 2004
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
North Carolina
. I then completed an interior and exterior observation of the subject property as described herein; A visual observation of the unobstructed, exposed surfaces of accessible areas from standing height was performed on the properties interior and exterior areas for valuation purposes and to determine compliance with HUD guidelines as outlined in HUD Handbook 4150.2, Appendix D and revised pages of Handbook 4150.2, Valuation Analysis for Home Insurance for Single Family One-to Four-Unit Dwellings. The physical observation process is intended to be sufficient to identify the readily apparent attributes of the subject site and improvements within the context of developing an opinion of value and within the typical scope of observations normally employed by appraisers for valuation purposes. It should not be confused with a comprehensive technical property inspection as would be conducted by a professional building inspector, home inspector, engineer or other technically trained person. Unless otherwise indicated, the appraiser has not observed areas that are not readily accessible such as, but not limited to, surfaces not viewable from the ground or systems below ground such as septic systems, wells, etc. As per HUD/FHA documentation "The appraiser is not required to disturb insulation, move personal items, furniture, equipment, plant life, soil, snow, ice or debris that may obstruct access or visibility". The appraiser is NOT a "Home Inspector" and can only report conditions based on the visual observation noted above. The physical observation of readily observable characteristics is also intended to identify readily observable deficiencies that endanger the health and safety of the occupants and the marketability of the property. The appraiser DOES NOT warrant any part/whole of the subject property, environmental conditions or other conditions that would require a licensed professional such as identifying the existence of Lead Based paint, Mold, Soil Slippage, Hazardous Waste, Radon Gas etc. Unless otherwise noted within this report I did not test the subject's mechanical systems; the appraiser is not an expert with regard to mechanical issues or electrical-plumbing-roof-foundation systems etc. If the client has any questions or concerns regarding these issues, it is the client's responsibility to use due diligence and order the appropriate inspections by qualified parties. The appraiser's inspection included noting the apparent condition, quality, utility, amenities and architectural style.
 

Mike Garrett RAA

Elite Member
Gold Supporting Member
Joined
Jan 14, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Colorado
Give me a break! The more you write the less they will read and the more there is for some bright lawyer to nail you on.
 

Anthem

Thread Starter
Senior Member
Joined
Mar 10, 2004
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
North Carolina
Give me a break! The more you write the less they will read and the more there is for some bright lawyer to nail you on.

So you think adding more would be piling on?
 
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