• Welcome to AppraisersForum.com, the premier online  community for the discussion of real estate appraisal. Register a free account to be able to post and unlock additional forums and features.

GLA Or Not GLA......

Status
Not open for further replies.

Ghost Rider

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 27, 2003
Professional Status
Banking/Mortgage Industry
State
Connecticut
Doing a nice little colonial, 1920s or so, but the problem is this.....The built the damn house into the hillside. So, the rear of the first floor is partially below grade. It land runs from about 7 feet above floor level of the first floor in the rear, to ground level in the front. All there is on the first floor is a bathroom (located in the rear, and does have an adequate egress window, but just barely) a kitchen from which the front door enters, and a living room (front and side egress window)......So my question is, is the first floor FBA, or GLA?? Curious to see what you all might think.
 

Mike Garrett RAA

Elite Member
Gold Supporting Member
Joined
Jan 14, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Colorado
If it is below grade...it's below grade. I would do it according to the guidelines and just explain it.
 

Ghost Rider

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 27, 2003
Professional Status
Banking/Mortgage Industry
State
Connecticut
I agree, but do I consider it a basement, and FBA, and try to explain the kitchen in the basement thing, or do I call if GLA, a colonial on slab, and see how much the underwriter freaks. Needless to say, I don't have good comps in EITHER direction.
 

Tater Salad

Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Missouri
This sounds like a lot of the raised ranch homes in my area. The entire basement is above grade at the front of the home, and 1/2 or more below grade in back. With those, I count only what is completely above grade as GLA and call the area below grade finished basement.

Now, none of these that I've seen have been 1920 Colonials. Some raised ranch comps, some older Colonials on slabs? At least in my area, if the kitchen in the basement makes sense for the style of the home (multi-level, split-foyer, raised ranch, etc.) there doesn't appear to be much market reaction. Maybe a marketing time issue, and not even that if the neighborhood is hot.
 

Tim Hicks (Texas)

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Texas
What, they don't have earth homes up in your areas? Heck, I hate mowing and I am sure not about to own a home where I had to mow the roof! :(
 

Tater Salad

Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Missouri
Yea, we got earth homes, geos, trouses. I don't call 'em earth homes if there is a second story fully above grade. If the dirt is near the roof, it's an earth home to me.

Maybe I misunderstood the description. Is there a second floor fully above grade? If not, I'm with Tim--it's a Colonial bermie. :blink:
 

Ted Martin

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2002
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
Kansas
Sounds like a slab two story, if the front door threashold is on the lower level. If the front door threashold is on the upper level then it's a ranch with a full finished walkout basement. What will the market comparable it too? We've got some of these in my part of the world. I've had the best luck using 1.5 and 2 story comps, adjustment percentages were the smallest and it most closely reflected the most probable buyer. I don't think that a ranch buyer would consider this home since there is a set of stairs between the public (kitchen/living) and private (bedrooms) areas of the home. I use a description of 1.5StoryEC (1.5 story earth contact).
 

bradellis

Member
Joined
Jan 16, 2002
Folks,

Let me toss a little gasoline on the fire-

Has anyone defined the "grade"?

Is it possible to have a grade that slopes 45 degrees? I say YES.

What do you all think?

Brad Ellis, IFA, RAA
 

Mike Garrett RAA

Elite Member
Gold Supporting Member
Joined
Jan 14, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Colorado
Grade can be almost anything...I use the threshold test. If it is below the threshold...it's below grade!
 

Jo Ann Meyer Stratton

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 16, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Arizona
Grade for a house can be anything is very true. The "ghost town" of Jerome and the former mining town of Bisbee have three and four story homes--all at ground level with each level having doors going to a yard and some window sills at ground level. Jerome also has the jail that slid downhill, it is now about a block further down the mountain than the original location. And since some of them were built before indoor plumbing became fasionable, you can take your pick of which level you wanted to use for the living room or kitchen or bedroom. And in Jerome, all rooms have views for about 50 to 100 miles.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Find a Real Estate Appraiser - Enter Zip Code

Copyright © 2000-, AppraisersForum.com, All Rights Reserved
AppraisersForum.com is proudly hosted by the folks at
AppraiserSites.com
Top

AdBlock Detected

We get it, advertisements are annoying!

Sure, ad-blocking software does a great job at blocking ads, but it also blocks useful features of our website. For the best site experience please disable your AdBlocker.

I've Disabled AdBlock
No Thanks