• Welcome to AppraisersForum.com, the premier online  community for the discussion of real estate appraisal. Register a free account to be able to post and unlock additional forums and features.

Have You Heard This One?

Status
Not open for further replies.

Tim Hicks (Texas)

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Texas
It is the nature of the beast. Appraisal firms only need help when they are busy and then they don't have time to hire someone. Actually, the appraisal business is just like any other business. You can not make anybody hire you and you have to be lucky, timely and quite irresistable to be hired. The big appraisal shops are the only ones that can "afford" to hire trainees and they can be quite picky. Only, because they make the rules. Just like the big companies.
 

Dee Dee

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 16, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Colorado
Hi Keith,

Frustrating, isn't it?

I heard comments like that quite a few times before finding a mentor. It didn't make any sense to me until I finally found out how much I didn't know about appraising when I started working. In the time that it took to teach me something my mentor could have done it herself at least three times, not had to split the fee, and not had to double check every move I made to make sure it was correct.

The sad truth is that rookies cost time and lost income for at least the first few months of training time. The dropout rate is fairly high, so if the trainee doesn't work out that loss can't be recovered over time after the trainee becomes more efficient and needs less assistance.

Every busy licensed appraiser has to choose between making an unhindered stream of income when the work is readily available, or sacrificing some of that income by taking on a trainee who may or may not be useful six months down the road if the workflow continues to be high.

Enter the sweatshop style of training. Most have newbies with just a few months of experience training fresh recruits. 'Teamwork' is the buzzword and any rookie that doesn't do their part to help in the 'training' process is not considered a useful part of the chain. When the rookies finally get enough hours in and are fully licensed they're expected to sign off reports for the rookies who are trained by rookies, though most will bolt out the door the minute they've fullfilled the requirements to do so.

It's a no-win situation for the entire profession.
 

dezra

Sophomore Member
Joined
Oct 25, 2002
Is that the same as "sorry, we don't want competition, but want you to think we are successful?" GOSH, DO I NEED TO FIND A MENTOR, TOO! :eyecrazy:
 

Tater Salad

Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Missouri
Dezra, that's only the final straw, adding insult to injury.

As far as I know, we are the only industry where you are taking your livelihood into your own hands by taking on a trainee. There is no task, aside from office functions, that a trainee can legally perform for the first 6months to a year without having the supervisor as a shadow. How is that beneficial to the supervisor? It may give him a warm, fuzzy feeling knowing that he's helping the future of the profession.

After this training process, the supervisor may let you inspect on your own for lenders that won't require the supervisor to inspect. But he still needs to review the work file to make sure that the best comps were selected, adjustments are reasonable, etc.

After the trainee gets his license, and the supervisor finally gets a break, the trainee decides that 100% of the fee is better than 50% and books. Or, business slows down and the supervisor can't support you anymore.

It's not like other jobs where there is at least some early realization of added benefit to having a trainee. If you burn the fries at McDonald's, you may lose your job but the manager can make another batch of fries. You burn the fries on an appraisal, the owner can lose his license. The system is broke. If lender's would be more accepting of trainee reports (they are getting them anyway from the sups that are checking the "did inspect" box when they shouldn't) it would be easier on the honest sups to make a living using trainees. But when we are held personally and 100% liable for any mistake made by the trainee, up to and including loss of license, can you blame anyone for being a little nervous?

When it's busy, it makes it even harder to keep up and be a good sup. It's a circular argument. :blink:
 

Mary Arlinghaus

Freshman Member
Joined
Jun 13, 2003
Professional Status
Licensed Appraiser
State
Michigan
In my area (MI) trainees don't go on their own until the entire 2000 hours have been completed, proofs and samples submitted to state, and full license arrives. This means that the first year I have to go on every assignment with the "newbie" and then if it goes well I only have to reinspect each property in the second year as trainees don't sign in MI they get listed in the addendum as to contribution.

On average, some of my fellow app's figure a trainee costs the appraiser at least $10,000.00 in lost income the first year and with luck becomes a break even situation the following years. :eek:

Most appraisers use a graduated scale for trainees starting with about 15-20% for the first 20 reports and slowly increasing. Most of us also have a list a mile long of trainees looking for help - just look at how many people were in your class!

Some appraisers charge the trainee for the first 3 to 6 months, but will train part time, so you can have income from another job.

Some train the way I was trained 20+ years ago. For 6 months I shadowed 2 excellent appraisers - 1 day per week each. When I had time, I ran errands, drew floor plans, checked county records, and learned a heck of a lot. I would have gladly paid them for the training, and it also served as a trial by fire - i figured that if i liked working for free then I'd love working for money :rofl:

I wish I had the personnel and strength to train a bunch of newbies, but then the bills would never get paid!

Mary
 

dezra

Sophomore Member
Joined
Oct 25, 2002
The hand-holding is not required in all states though. However, I am still empathetic to the downtime appraisers initially put into checking trainee work, and that's why I am offering a cut of the inspections and business we bring in, in order to compensate. If you have selected the right trainees to invest in, they will catch on and that downtime will decrease quickly.

Some of it is about giving someone who is starting their opportunity. Afterall, if someone didn't give you one, where would you be? We are wanting a chance and have done alot leading up to this point to present ourselves proudly as people who would become assets and not liabilities.

If you know of someone who could use two great people to work for and with them, please let us know.
:yellowblack:
Dezra Lehr-Guthrie
 

dezra

Sophomore Member
Joined
Oct 25, 2002
One more thing, though, and in response to you, Mary. I want to thank you for taking the time to share your candid experience with this. It helps to balance anyone out there who might be feeling a little over hopeful that this is an easy field to get into. We realize it is not. We know what we are getting into, the value of an opportunity and what we have to offer in return. Imagine, if that firm never gave you the chance to type, to run errands, to do research, to shadow them, you would not be on the other end today, telling me how much of a pain and loss of profit it is to train someone, and reminding me how expendible I am in light of the bizillion other trainees out there. It's not about making our own opportunities, it is about someone providing the forum for us to. What if those two excellent appraiser did not provide the forum for you to learn. You sound like the right person I'd like to be trained by -- saavy, tough-as-nails, appreciative of the worth of your occupation, clear-headed, practical and smart enough to be able to sort of emotion in favor of ambition. I hope that my mentor is all of what you are, because then I'll become one helluva good :beer: appraiser. And that's what I want to be.
 

Dee Dee

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 16, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Colorado
Originally posted by dezra@Jun 17 2003, 02:43 PM
The hand-holding is not required in all states though. However, I am still empathetic to the downtime appraisers initially put into checking trainee work, and that's why I am offering a cut of the inspections and business we bring in, in order to compensate. If you have selected the right trainees to invest in, they will catch on and that downtime will decrease quickly.

Dezra,

There would likely be a conflict of interest worthy of a lawsuit if the appraiser is also the inspector or gets a cut of the inspector's fee. Inspectors and appraisers DO NOT work hand-in-hand. On the surface it might seem like a great way to compensate a supervisor for training you, but the truth is that only those who wish to risk losing their license for a few extra bucks would be impressed with that kind of offer.

Like it or not, you will need your hand held. What you learn in your trainee classes isn't even the tip of the iceberg of what you have yet to learn. Every newbie in this forum will tell you that until you start working you'll never fully understand what it takes to make it in this business....and the learning process never really ends.

Read the threads in the newbies/wannabe's section of this forum. You will be able to pick up some useful information about how to polish your approach to getting a foothold in this business.
 

dezra

Sophomore Member
Joined
Oct 25, 2002
Dee-Dee:

I don't mean to refute you, but I know several people who do both. I do not believe this is a conflict of interest to have a business that offers both services, but I will be sure to check into it. I am not a person who breaks the law. Monitoring and review, to me, are not the same as hand-holding. Then again, you may be right. I have an open mind and will check out what you have said in your post. From all the aspects of appraisal I've seen, it appears to be a field where learning is ongoing at all stages and no matter how many years you do it. Is that correct? *G* :yellowblack:
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Find a Real Estate Appraiser - Enter Zip Code

Copyright © 2000-, AppraisersForum.com, All Rights Reserved
AppraisersForum.com is proudly hosted by the folks at
AppraiserSites.com
Top

AdBlock Detected

We get it, advertisements are annoying!

Sure, ad-blocking software does a great job at blocking ads, but it also blocks useful features of our website. For the best site experience please disable your AdBlocker.

I've Disabled AdBlock
No Thanks