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Help with a stone foundation!!!

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Tom Curran

Sophomore Member
Joined
Oct 18, 2002
I just looked at a property that is over 100 years old. Howeverm, it has recently been completely remodeled. Everything looks great, no sloping floors or anything like that. My problem is that a portion of the foundation is stone. It seems when they did the remodel, they ran sheet metal flashing all around the protion of the foundation that was stone.

My question to you wise FHA gurus is this: There doesn't seem to be any water leekage (because of the flashing) and the structure seems to be sound. When I pulled back a corner of the flashing, there was some grout missing from in between the stones, but, again, no water leekage was viewed. Everything else passes. Can I pass this?

Thanks in advance for your help

Tom
 
Joined
Jan 13, 2002
Professional Status
Retired Appraiser
State
Florida
State what you saw and recommend (not require) a foundation inspection by a professional in that field.

At least, that's what I would do.
 

Farm Gal

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 14, 2002
Professional Status
Licensed Appraiser
State
Nebraska
Tom:

This is is my best recollection of opinion direct from a HUD engineer whom I happen to highly respect.
~~~~~~~
Foundations are a HUGE problem in many areas where the ground is composed of expansive soils.... Interestingly stone foundations due to their sheer massivity, tend to be LESS subject to this issue than poured concrete! In addition the ability of stone foundations to shed water rather than acting as 'reverse' swimming pools (with no way to release hydrualic pressure buildup), may be LESS prone to failure from water than cement. Grout degradation absent any significant movement is not a cause for failure of itself. IF there is in your opinion, no observable movement, do not call for an inspection. Think on it this way, if it has stood and appears sound after 100 years, how likely assuming reasonable maintenence and care, is it to fail during the life of the loan? IF however you have concerns do not hesitate to call for an inspection".
~~~~~~~~

Made sense to me! :D

YOU HOC may vary in opinion 8O ...
I reccomend that you ask THEM and document the reply to cover your rear.

The winds of chage sweep ever over gov't programs :roll:
 

Pat Butler

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Illinois
I've owned about a dozen houses with stone foundations. Many stone foundations in our area are 36" thick. Even when they settlte, the stone sort of crushes itself a little and the stone dust starts to compact under the pressure and starts to and become hard like mortar after awhile. Compare that to a poured concrete foundation with a crack that will let water just flow in. After a stone foundation has settled for a hundred years or so, they become extremely stable.
 

Ben Vukicevich SRA

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 9, 2002
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
New Jersey
Tom,

From 4150.2 Page 3-13

Note that stone and brick foundations are mentioned specifically, why I don't know..as almost all city homes would be rejected if the foundations were not in good condition.


10. Foundations
All foundations must be adequate to withstand all normal loads imposed. Stone and brick
foundations are acceptable if they are in good condition. The appraiser must review the
conditions in VC-8 for evidence of conditions that could indicate safety or structural
deficiencies that may require repair.
> If the foundation is deficient, mark "YES" in VC-8 and prepare the appraisal "as-repaired"
subject to the repair of the deficiencies.


I'd go for the cert.

Ben
 

Ross (CO)

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Colorado
Tom, ......When you say "no water leakage was observed" should one assume you were observing from below the house in a base level area ? Was it a rainy day ? I am sure they placed that metal flashing there for the very impervious barrier that it would serve to be, ...no rain...no ice !....no wind. The h/o probably noticed the grout was beginning to fail after these 100 years and the flashing was sensible. I have seen exposed stone foundations painted-over with several heavy coats of paint and served the same purpose of keeping out the "elements". Was the metal flashing perhaps painted to match the color of siding just above it ? Abide by the VC reporting req's, take a picture for your file, but it sounds like your home was not negatively affected.......unless the flashing was shiny and "ugly" and make one really wonder what it was hiding.
 
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