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Home moved from its original location

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msking

Thread Starter
Freshman Member
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Feb 24, 2002
A tenant has requested an appraisal on the property he rents with the intention of purchasing the property from the owner. The purchase is likely to be seller financed.

When I set the appointment and asked a few questions about the home, the tenant/potential buyer told me it was built in 1954, and had been moved to its current site from about 5 miles away more than 10 years ago. It is not a manufactured or modular home - it was originally stick-built, just happened to be moved.

The tenant has lived in the home for 7 years, and has done some maintanance and improving - nothing that needs permits (refinished the hardwood floors, painted, etc.) He is not aware of any problems that might be related to the movement of the home.

Any particular problems/challenges that I should anticipate due to the fact that the home was not originally built on the property?
 
A

Anonymous

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You probably should recommend (but not necessarily require) a structural inspection and report the fact you were informed that the house had been moved to the site. We see quite a few of those in my area, and I cannot think of any that have failed structurally, but I am not about to warrantee that.
 

jtrotta

Senior Member
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Jan 16, 2002
Moving houses from one site to another, may possibly cause "Hidden" problems that may not show up for some time; therefore, Terrell has suggested the appropriate venue. I would strongley recomend a "Home Inspection" basement to attic type. 8)

Good Luck :!:
 
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MSKING

About a year ago, I appraised a home that had been moved and then reonvated. I did the appraisal for lending purposes prior to the home being moved (lending is not my normal bag but both the lender and owner who was an underwriter for a lending institution specifically wanted me since the issues were a bit unique). I found several home that had been moved early on in their 'lives" and could not see any market dimunition for that factor. I also came back a couple of years later after the work was done, much of it by the owner, for a refi. No discernable problems.

It is not a bad idea to "recommend" the inspection, especially if you see something that might be of concern, but I would not "require" the extra expense unless you were real uncomfortable.

Regards

Tom Hildebrandt GAA
 

jtrotta

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 16, 2002
Tom;
yep your right except for the "non-recomendation" of the home inspection. The reason I would strongley recomend one is that there are "hidden" items that cannot be noted by an interior visual inspection.

Example; if the house was "racked" for any reason, you could have walls out of plumb; you could have a separation of various timbers (roof rafters; floor joist; and corner posts) that could eventually lead to problem area's within those "hidden wall & ceiling area's". These items would be more attributable to "stick built" dwellings, due to their "on site" construction. 8)
 
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Jan 16, 2002
Professional Status
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North Carolina
jtrotta

I do not disagree with the recommendation to have the inspection. It is really a judgement thing and depends entirely on the appraisers background and comfort level with making the judgement. The main point I hoped to make was just that I do not think it was automatically required by typical appraisal practice.

Best Regards

Tom Hildebrandt GAA
 

airphoto

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2002
Professional Status
Retired Appraiser
State
Pennsylvania
Tom H.,

Good answer .. house was moved 'more than ten years ago.' A reasonable person would expect that any problems resulting from the move would have manifested themselves by now. Not only that, but there's just as likely to be normal 'more than ten year old house' problems as there are results of the move.

Non-issue in my book .. anything not obvious from a cursory inspection wouldn't show up in any normal appraisal, anyway ..
 

Jeff Horton

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Alabama

Example; if the house was "racked" for any reason, you could have walls out of plumb; you could have a separation of various timbers (roof rafters; floor joist; and corner posts) that could eventually lead to problem area's within those "hidden wall & ceiling area's". These items would be more attributable to "stick built" dwellings, due to their "on site" construction.
Most home inspections would not turn up those "hidden wall & ceiling area's" problems. As a home inspector I clearly state in my contract that I do not tear anything apart. Hidden defects are just that HIDDEN and I can not see them. If there is insulation in the attic odds are structural problems are not going to be seen such as rafters seperated from a wall plate. While I highly recommend Home Inspections most smart inspectors will clearly tell you that we inspected readly visable areas.

Now granted there may be clues to a problem though.
 
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