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How Can I Be Soooo Lucky

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Allen Bruckner

Junior Member
Joined
Oct 25, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Florida
Those of you who have followed my move to a larger firm know I moved 3 weeks ago. Wrong move. I can not do anything right for this firm. He has a number of appraisers working for him and I have done a dozen appraials in the past weeks. Not one of them is good, everything i do is no good. I have already been told that if I don't like the way things are done that I don't have to come back. I have told him that I will be good at what I do, and he say's thats Ok because I'm new, But the next breath I have to get thing right or "Don't come back".
I have heald my tongue and am giving it everything i have. I don't mind working till 11:00 pm and starting at 7:00 am. I have told him I will correct everything I do wrong, Why, Because i want to be the best. But i sure don't know how long i can take his attitude. I think he likes to punish by holding back appraisals and slowing you down. I heard him tell his office manager today to hire someone else for a certain area, because the appraiser is getting sloppy, so he wants to cut back on his work. I can understand this, but he has nothing good to say about any of his appraisers except one.
I know I have a lot to learn and I am sure willing to. But attitude is everthing. If I wanted to be depresed in a job I would have kept my old career field. I don't understand how some people can be such a-holes.
Doesn't dedication and loyalty and willingness to break your back mean anything anymore.
To all you newbees, be careful, be very careful...
 

Tim Hicks (Texas)

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Texas
Ah, the sweat shop. The trainee should be a reflection of the trainer. If you have any shortcomings, isn't it a direct result of poor training? There is never a stupid question. Try this. "Please show me what I did wrong and I will never make that mistake again. I am here to learn to be as good as you, sooner than later, my mistakes will be eliminated."
 

Walter Kirk

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 24, 2003
Professional Status
Licensed Appraiser
State
New Jersey
Allen,
It seems that you are working for a bully whose style is to put you down and insult you. Don't take the abuse.

When I was starting out I worked for such a bully. He had been in business for a long time and he had a great office but he seemed to enjoy insulting everyone who worked for him. At one point he had a man in tears in the office. I decided that the paycheck was not worth the aggravation.

The next time he insulted me, he called me an a**hole, I stood up in front of the whole office and said in my best South Camden language "who the F*** do you think you are talking to". He told me to calm down, that that was just the way he talked and he ment nothing by it. He never insulted me again.
 

Mike Garrett RAA

Elite Member
Gold Supporting Member
Joined
Jan 14, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Colorado
I have to smile about this post.....ahhhh, the grass is never greener on the other side of the fence. I, too, worked for an appraiser (MAI) who made Attila the Hun look like Sister Theresa. He is no longer in the business because he couldn't control his attitude; however, he was a damn good appraiser and I learned things from him.

It seems that most good appraisers are not people people. Guess it comes from being independent, working alone a lot, and the pressure this business puts one under. Who said being a supervisor is easy??? One thing to remember is that every trainee an appraiser takes on is a problem in one form or another. The more trainees....the more problems, thus, the ASB's reasoning for having only one or two at a time.

Style is important in selecting a mentor, in fact, it is more important than the money. You should find someone you can be comfortable with. If you are thin skinned, you need someone who is gentle, slow, and has the time to nurse you along. Others prefer having a trainer who cuts to the chase, doesn't mince words, and piles it on. Just remember, all of us are maximally stressed right now.

I would suggest you ask for a meeting with your supervisor. Sit down and find out what he/she expects of you. Find out how far he/she is willing to go with you before throwing your butt out the door. Ask for written guidelines. If you can't please him/her...leave.

One final thing to remember....you need us...we can always replace you. There are literally hundreds of trainees out there looking for jobs. Sometimes you just have to bite your tongue, suck it up, and stick it out. You might not be God's gift to appraisal...yet.

I would be willing to look over a couple of your reports to see if they are really that bad. Back when I was a candidate for the SRA, one of the reviewers was especially helpful. He gave me some really great tips on improving my reports. One of the things that really helped me mentally was him saying...."you are not expected to be perfect in the beginning; however, we look for improvement in your work as time goes by. In other words, your appraisals today should be better than your appraisals from a year ago".

I wish you well!
 

George Hatch

Elite Member
Gold Supporting Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2002
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
California
Some folks are good appraisers.

Some folks are good teachers.

Some folks are good managers.

Some folks can tell a great joke.

It's not realisic to expect everyone to be able to do everything well.


At this point, you get to define exactly what "sink or swim" means to you. If you want this badly enough, you'll find a way to do what you have to do to satisfy your own goals of accumulating your hours and learning to become a good appraiser, whilst reducing the hassle factor to the absolute minimum.

It's been my experience that folks who act like this are not truly comfortable or confident with actually managing subordinates. They fear dissent and dread the prospect of being proven wrong or somehow inferior. They want obedience and order more than they want independence and initiative. From your description, it looks like he really hates getting called on an error by any of his clients. Details are important to him. You can probably avoid some of the hostility by keeping this in mind and working your plan accordingly.

It's just like any other job. You need to figure out what's important to your boss (or your client, as the case may be) and then make sure you give that to them first. In this case, it looks like its the details that count. I'll bet your boss would much rather have you approach him with your problems, however minor, and your best solutions when they come up rather than having him read about them in your reports. Seek input from him rather than try to work everything out on your own. You can demonstrate your attention to detail by carefully proofing your work a couple times, having another appraiser or the office manager give it the once over, and finally by not approaching your boss on the same issue twice. There must be at least one appraiser in the shop in whom your boss has confidence. That's the person you should be trying to mimic. We're not talking about kissing butt, we're talking about choosing your role models.

I think this is a managable situation and as a trainee, one you might actually have to endure. The experience will definitely prepare you better for dealing with unruly clients in the future. I also think that if you can make it in this shop, you'll end up being a pretty good appraiser. If I were you, I'd think twice before I abandon ship.
 

Allen Bruckner

Junior Member
Joined
Oct 25, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Florida
I appreciate all the comments. I will suck it up, and i will become a great appraiser. I just have to get a bit more thick skinned as the Old Guy Sayeth.

Thanks all.

P.S.
When i become a trainer, please slap the crap out of me if i don't treat people with respect.
 

Michael Elliott

Sophomore Member
Joined
Apr 13, 2003
Originally posted by Allen Bruckner@Jul 8 2003, 07:44 PM
When i become a trainer, please slap the crap out of me if i don't treat people with respect.
Don't you mean to "respectfully" slap the crap out of you? :)
 

Restrain

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 22, 2002
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
Florida
Go get a couple of his appraisals from last year and see how he writes them. Make drop-ins of his boiler plate, copy his style, and study how he makes his adjustments. What he wants is a fast working clone of himself. So, either become that or find another mentor.

Roger Strahan, IFA
 

dezra

Sophomore Member
Joined
Oct 25, 2002
Your mentor sounds moody! It sounds like you wanted to feel valued and he is making you feel expendible instead. It might just be the experience you are having from being new and unsure, knowing that you aren't doing everything right. That might be an unfamiliar feeling that is distasteful. Nonetheless, he is not getting rid of you. If you were that lousy, he would have said se la by now, knowing there are others who would like to step in your place. Your desire to take this as a challenge, suck it up and be the best you can be is bound to get you through and you are bound to learn from the experience. One thing's for certain -- you are not wasting your time. You have nothing to lose by staying and seeing whether he does kick you out. And if he does happen to kick you out, you can pick yourself up, dust yourself off, tally up how many hours you have towards the 2,000 now and keep going. Your goal is still ahead of you.
 
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