• Welcome to AppraisersForum.com, the premier online  community for the discussion of real estate appraisal. Register a free account to be able to post and unlock additional forums and features.

In your face homeowners or tenants durring the inspection

Status
Not open for further replies.
M

mdappr

Thread Starter
Guest
This use to really bother me when a household occupant would constantly talk to me about everything and anything and other info not needed, and follow you around the the whole house, standing so cllose that one cannot properly measure, take notes, and shoot photos, etc. Excuse me I need to take a photo, whould you please move. whoops I need to remeasure that distance because you were talking too much. I ratter deal with a pack of big muddy jumping dogs! Now, I just somewhat ignore them in my mine and focus on the subject property and packed with most the antidote anwsers if they have any typical worring questions. But when I look at my notes they can be incomplete which will take even longer to complete an appraisals. I wrote this topic beacuse Im working on a report and some my photos are no good because there are people in them eventhough I took several shots. I never have this problem when the not so too proud of a home owner is kicking-back on the couch watching tv and eating a sandwich, drinking a beer, or even better a vacant house or new construction. Any sugestions?
 

Farm Gal

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 14, 2002
Professional Status
Licensed Appraiser
State
Nebraska
Yeah:
Tell them to MOVE - NOW!!!

I usually tell them that Federal Regulations prohibit the presence of humans in the photos and I need them to back out of the shot.

With regard to them babbling, if I think it is going to be a problem, I generally try to give them something to do: sit them down at the table and ask them to write down any major improvements they ahve made in the last few years... OR tell them bluntly that if they distract me I am quite likely to miss something in my inspection that might be to their benefit :twisted: and that I work best in complete silence :wink: I also tell them I will answer any questions at the end of my viewing of thier home... injecting I'm not done yet enough times to make them believers

Stone amazing how fast they shut up when you put it to them that way :D

I think you are just being too nice :idea:
 
Joined
Jan 13, 2002
Professional Status
Retired Appraiser
State
Florida
Sometimes I smile and tell them, "Since I'm so used to doing this by myself, I now charge extra if you want to help." If this doesn't work (it almost always does), I'll add that I will sit down and discuss it with them after I complete my measurements and filling in my form. "I'm so used to doing this in a certain order that I'm afraid I'll miss something if we keep chatting as I go along."

Pictures - I tell them I'll take a of picture of them and email it to them if they'd like, but for the appraisal, they cannot be in the picture. "You know, those crazy Federal laws!"
 

mikegoff

Sophomore Member
Joined
Jan 28, 2002
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
Florida
I have a form letter that describes my appraisal process (scope) and turn around times. The form asks the tenent/homeowner to disclose known deficiencies, verify sales price and terms, write down recent upgrades or remodeling, any other pertinent disclosures and requires their signature. That usually gives me enough time to photo, list and measure. Also answers the typical questions you get asked time and time again, leaving only specific or untypical questions to answer at end of property viewing. The form letter has been adjusted many times to take into account special seasons (rainy, tourist, etc.) and takes about 15 to 20 minutes to read and answer (just long enough to get most of the outside job done). It is a great document to have in file should questions arrive about defects or disclosure. It keeps them out of my way, yet involves them in the process. I've even contemplated using a carbon paper copy to leave with the homeowner/tenent (good source of advertising?).
Form also describes difference between home inspection and appraisal, it has saved me valuable time when I'm real busy.
 

Mike Garrett RAA

Elite Member
Gold Supporting Member
Joined
Jan 14, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Colorado
Hmmmmm, pray tell where it says in "Federal Law" you cant have people in the pictures? I don't think so! We have been ask by Fannie Mae, FHA, and VA not to have people in the photos but I can't find a law anywhere. I always tell the home owner that FHA or VA or Fannie Mae prefers there not be any individuals in the pictures because it could be construded to indicate the ethnicticity of the neighborhood. I am sure you understand...and then smile big time.

Occupational hazard...comes with the job...dealing with home owners. One of the things you can do is create a check list (disclosure sheet) and give it to the home owner to fill out. Usually takes about as long as the inspection and keeps them busy. Sometimes I like having them tag along...to hold the end of the tape or control the pets, etc.
 

George Hatch

Elite Member
Gold Supporting Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2002
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
California
Attitude helps. Or maybe I should say that projecting a very detached attitude helps. I generally start looking the exterior over and make a couple notes before I even make contact. Even if they're standing outside when I'm walking up, I'll stop up short and start making a couple notes, just to let them know that I'm conducting business and that salesmanship is not part of the inspection. Then I tell 'em I'm going to measure the exterior and take some photos and make some notes first, then come back to ask them to show me the interior(s) afterwards. If they want to accompany me while I measure, that's OK, except I'm not very talkative. I don't usually ask a lot of questions or get communicative until after I'm done looking. At that point, I actually interview them, run through the high points and ask them if there's anything I missed. I make it a point not to get personally involved with them until after I'm done with the walk-through and diagram portions of my inspection. After that, I'm free to chat for a few minutes so that we don't part with them thinking I don't care.

Being a little aloof helps keep them out of your hair and inhibits them from trying to intimidate you to bump the value. Then when you do turn it on for them they think they have broken through and made a love connection. I guess it's pretty manipulative to work them that way, but I don't have time to listen to their "dream a little dream" routine. Keeping them at arm's length works pretty well too, but you can't leave it that way. They have to get a little something from you before you leave or else they think you don't care. I ended up learning that one the hard way.


George Hatch
 

Jim Bartley

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 20, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Virginia
Never really looked at as a problem. If they follow me around, I give 'em the dumb end of the tape and put 'em to work. I think I enjoy the cats and dogs more than I do the people. :lol:
 

Judy Whitehead (Florida)

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 20, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Florida
I agree, George. Usually, the "man" of the house wants to help me....I just tell him or anyone that I am so sorry, but I am used to doing this by myself....Hope you understand...nothing personal-it helps me think! As far as pictures are concerned - once I tell them that I have to take pictures... I stand there with the camera to my eye....they always run out of the picture.

My biggest failure (both as an appraiser and a real estate agent) is that I talk too much and I want everybody to like me. Then when my appraisal is lower than their "estimate" they are really pissed....they like me! How dare I do this to them! I'm trying to become more detached...I hope I succeed! This is serious to me.
 

larryhaskell

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 23, 2002
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
Nevada
Mike:

I don't think having people in the photo is against federal law as far as I know but is instead a fair lending issue.
 

Willie

Senior Member
Joined
May 30, 2002
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
Tennessee
I don't think it's against the law but it should be. Here in TN, it's very common to have a fat ugly hillbilly with a wad of tobacco in his or her mouth looking like they are wondering what I am doing with a befuttled look on their face as I get ready to shoot the picture. Normally, I ask them to take their Confederate flag down or put up the pot bellied pig and this gives them something to do. If they won't comply and they are really ugly, I tell them to get out of the picture, it could have a negative impact on the underwriters opinion of the home that is being appraised. I then tell them their mortgage broker is trying to sell this loan and you don't see many ugly people selling things in commercials. If that doesn't work, I just mention if their ugly face happens to break my 500 dollar digitall camera, I'm going to tack it to the invoice. They usually get the point, but not always.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Find a Real Estate Appraiser - Enter Zip Code

Copyright © 2000-, AppraisersForum.com, All Rights Reserved
AppraisersForum.com is proudly hosted by the folks at
AppraiserSites.com
Top

AdBlock Detected

We get it, advertisements are annoying!

Sure, ad-blocking software does a great job at blocking ads, but it also blocks useful features of our website. For the best site experience please disable your AdBlocker.

I've Disabled AdBlock
No Thanks