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Mexican style home; Need help.

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Sue McHugh

Thread Starter
Senior Member
Joined
Feb 9, 2003
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
New Hampshire
Well, this house is owned by a popular Mexican restaurant owner in NH. Most of the home is materials purchased from Mexico. I may avoid cost approach because it is truly unique to this area but I know there are people here that have seen this type of home so it would be nice to learn about this. Thanks.

The pillars in the front are typically made of what? (The homeowner wasn't home at the time of view) I will call him if I need to. The beams are hand carved in Mexico. They are on the living room ceiling. Every single room is unique. Mexican tile floors in the bathroom, concrete looking flooring in the kitchen, wood flooring in many of the other rooms, plaster walls in some rooms, drywall in others, tile flooring on the porch, cork flooring in the basement. All floors are heated. Custom home. I should have run away LOL.
 

nauthead

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 26, 2004
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
Florida
It could always be worse. I was waiting for Davey Crocket to open fire when I pulled up to this one.
 

Ray Miller

Elite Member
Joined
Feb 20, 2002
Professional Status
Licensed Appraiser
State
Wisconsin
No you should not run away. Find someone to help you with this style home and learn from it. SW style. I have a friend in Lincon, Ne that has one built with SW influence. You would think you were in the heart of Santa Fe, Tucson, Demming NM.

You will need to do some research on what was used in the construction and go from there. It might be over built for your area so adjustments will be called for.
 

nevalues

Freshman Member
Joined
Jan 13, 2008
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
New Hampshire
Sue,
I do not think that you will find a comparable in the area similar to the subject. I live in Manchester and have done more than a thousand appraisals in the area and never seen anything similar to the subject. The most important thing you have to do first is market research and by that I mean try to ignore for the first hour the cost of construction of the subject and start looking for comparable in the same market area with the same GLA, room count etc and maybe look into a contemp style homes. The most important thing you need to find out is: Are there buyers out there that will be willing to pay a premium for the additional features the subject has. It is really tough to say in this area. My personal opinion is, there are people who will be willing to pay a premium, but not a large premium.
 

nevalues

Freshman Member
Joined
Jan 13, 2008
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
New Hampshire
The second most important thing you need to do. Ask for a higher fee.
 

Mike Plumlee

Junior Member
Joined
Feb 21, 2007
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Texas
I'd describe it as a hacienda style home since it has open covered patios and breezeways (what is this doing in NH?).

It looks to have an exterior of cinder block and stucco. That is very common for this style and in the southwest. The picture is too small in pixels to get a good idea of the pillar composition. Did you walk up close enough to check it? It looks like carved wood.

As to the beams, the hand carving is nice. But the actual wood itself is not that attractive. At first glance, I thought it was redwood but after looking at it longer I don't think so. You'll probably have to ask the owner.

Maybe someone from San Antonio, New Mexico, or Arizona can give you a better clue. But this is going to be a fun one to appraise.
 

Sue McHugh

Thread Starter
Senior Member
Joined
Feb 9, 2003
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
New Hampshire
Thanks everyone.

NEvalues, I'm in Manch too. Never have seen something like this in NH either. I don't feel so quite alone. Sigh
 

Mike Boyd

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 18, 2002
Professional Status
Retired Appraiser
State
California
Have you only appraised tract built homes? Appraise it like you would any custom designed and built home. Customs similar to this were not uncommon in the '70s in California and Arizona.

Could not see the columns well enough but it is typical to start with a 2 x 6 and then bulk it up and wrap it with styrofoam. Then it is plastered so that the final effect gives the appearance of being a solid piece of lumber.
 

Sue McHugh

Thread Starter
Senior Member
Joined
Feb 9, 2003
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
New Hampshire
Mike,

The posts have a shiny texture. I am attaching a picture of just the post. I guess I was curious about their construction. Just built up decorated wood, that's interesting. I thought it was some fancier material.
 
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PropertyEconomics

Elite Member
Joined
Jun 19, 2007
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
New Mexico
The pillars are typically cast concrete which have smooth finish. If you look you can see the masonry lines. I find this typical construction of Spanish Colonials here in the southwest.
 
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