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Need Help Re: Heating Units

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alison woods

Freshman Member
Joined
Feb 1, 2003
Professional Status
Real Estate Agent or Broker
State
New York
Hi, I wonder if someone can help me, the boss is on vacation and I've had a call from an anxious client ... The client's home is old, in a rural area, has forced air heat with ducts on 1st floor but only 1 register going up to one of the two second floor bedrooms (not a forced air duct, but just a register from the floor below allowing heat to rise up). Lender wants heating installed on 2nd floor in order to make loan. We will definitely re-inspect once it has been installed, but client wants to know what is the least he can get away with in order to be considered as having heat up there ... I assume a permanently affixed electric baseboard unit would do, but is it okay if it plugs into an outlet in the room? Or does it need to be hardwired into the electrical system?

Thanks for your help.
 

Claudia Cullen

Sophomore Member
Joined
Dec 18, 2002
Professional Status
Licensed Appraiser
State
Massachusetts
Hi Alison:

I haven't come across this situation before, but I'd suggest contacting the local building inspector to see what is required in that town. If the situation you described is common in the area and is not a violation of the local building codes, you might be o.k.

Claudia Cullen
 

Mike Garrett RAA

Elite Member
Gold Supporting Member
Joined
Jan 14, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Colorado
My first reaction is "hard wired"; however, it depends on your local codes. Isn't it typical..."what is the least I can get away with"? I would make it a requirement to do both rooms. Some times having a receipt from a licensed electrician showing that the work has been done is sufficient for the lender and you won't have to re-inspect. It isn't cost effective for me to drive out in the boondocks for an inspection fee ($75).
 

wyecoyote

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2002
Professional Status
Gvmt Agency, FNMA, HUD, VA etc.
State
Washington
Alison,

It is not your job to decide what is the "minimal" requirements. Have them contact the local governing authority to find out what the building and planning department in that area requires for heating. They should be able to give the size of the space and find out from there. Also does the B & P dept allow plug in wiring or is it a requirment to be hard wired.

Simply put if you state that the "minimal" requirements are X and later it is found out to be Y then you are responsible for getting it to Y.
 

Ben Vukicevich SRA

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 9, 2002
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
New Jersey
Wow. Picky client...

Not even FHA requires a heat "supply" in every room...anymore. Just a heat "source"..whatever that is..could be the register in the floor..could be the heat going up the stairwell :D :D .


Ben
 

jtrotta

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 16, 2002
Have ta agree wit Bennie King :mrgreen:

and ifn it's a - l o n g staircase their may be more hot air at the top O the staircase, than on the first floor B)


Now, where are you located :question: ya want answer's - I gots questions :rolleyes:


:ph34r:
 

Steve Owen

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 16, 2002
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
Missouri
Wow. Picky client...

That was my first reaction. Don't know why it matters as long as it's warm enough up there.
 

Ted Martin

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2002
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
Kansas
Opinions:

1) Go with local code if it exists.

2) Have the underwriter make the call since they have knowlege of your market that you don't.
 

Don Clark

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Virginia
B) Common situation in my area. Since heat rises, and most of these older homes have at least 1 register or vent where heat can rise from 1st to second floor, that is good enough for me. Probably at least 30% of the homes in 1 city where I do business have homes just like you describe. I doubt there are any local requirements for "minimum" heat. There is no law as far as I know that says you have to have a central heat source with heat evenly dispersed throughout the house. In some areas, space heaters are used. I still see a lot of older homes with just 1 heat source, usually in the living room. You are an appraiser, not a code compliance inspector, home inspector, or contractor. Report what you see, the condition it is in, any deferred maintenance, safety or sanitation issues, and let someone else decide if it is adequate for the purpose it is being appraised for. Not much ,money in being a "caped crusader" these days. :beer:

on
 

Restrain

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 22, 2002
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
Florida
If they're going to have to install heat, why not just ask them what the heck they're putting in? It's not your job to figure out what they're going to do. If a section of the contract says that they're going to put in heat, they're going to have to have agreed as to the type of heat and have gotten estimates of the cost.

Once you know what they're going to do, then complete the report appropriately.

Roger Strahan, IFA
 
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