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Nieghborhood boundary question

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Jeff Horton

Thread Starter
Senior Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Alabama
This question is posed to you fellow 'rural appraisers'. How do you handle the URAR block for neighborhood description. In some rural areas there may be subdivision where I can specify some boundaries. But many area's I work there are no firm boundaries. Heck I don't even think there are any loose boundaries honestly. I have used a canned statement saying something to the effect that it is rural area and there are no firm boundaries. I have never been questioned on this.

I have been browsing the Alabama State Boards web site reading the minutes of some of the meetings. One of the things they wrote up Appraisers for was inadequate neighborhood boundaries descriptions. It appears that they are not singleing this out but adding to a list of other problems. But it has made me think twice about my statement for rural areas.

So what say ye? How do you handle this?
 

Mountain Man

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2002
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
Georgia
Jeff,
It maybe the old FHA in me, but I always put in some boundaries. Even if it is the county as a whole or "See area map attached".

Boundary descriptions in my rural area are often something like: My Mountain north, Dads Ridge east, Green Lake south, and the Wildland National Forest west. Or sometimes: Highway 41 to Highway 105 to Highway 58.
 

Blue1

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 14, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
California
Jeff,

Like M Leggett says; in rural areas your boundaries may be creeks, mountains, valleys, etc. I had one where "Scareface Gulch" was a Southern boundary. You could even use communities, i.e. "Millville to the West, Viola to the East, Round Mountain to the North and Manton to the South." Check out the terrain, sometimes as boundary may be a ridge, etc. Just use your common sense. :wink:

P.S. I too have NEVER been questioned on boundaries.......
 

Richard Carlsen

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2002
Professional Status
Licensed Appraiser
State
Michigan
I use this statement when there is trouble defining the boundaries (which is most of the time in our low destiny rural market:

NEIGHBORHOOD HAS RELATIVELY INDETERMINATE BOUNDARIES. FOR THE PURPOSE OF THIS REPORT, INCLUDES ALL PROPERTIES WITHIN A 1/2-MILE RADIUS OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY. NO ADVERSE CONDITIONS WERE OBSERVED. SEE ADDENDUM COMMENTS.
 

Bobby Bucks

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 27, 2002
Professional Status
Real Estate Agent or Broker
State
North Dakota
Jeff I’ve always found it easier to define neighborhood boundaries for rural properties than for suburbia. I try to use natural boundaries whenever possible. Creeks, rivers, drywashes seem more
suitable than road numbers. It’s also fun to use landmarks which no longer exist or exist seasonally......ie. Hanging Woman’s Live Oak or Cody’s Drywash. Only the most anal underwriter or field reviewer would have a problem with this and how do they disprove something that might not be there anymore? I believe you can find in the archives a post where I have used roadkill to define a marketing area. The great part about roadkill is that it is very accurate on the date of the inspection and in a worst case scenario, if you get a retrospective field review by a Hezbollah reviewer, the evidence that can be used against you will no longer exist. :)
 

Dave Smith

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 14, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Wisconsin
Here is my definition of neighborhood for virtually all my work. Its never been questioned or challenged.

"The market area for the purposes of this report consists of all of northern Door County. The market area size reflects the geographic shape of the county and the fact that the general public views the area as a single economic or market entity, with the entire area influenced by similar market conditions, municipal services and a single school district."
 

airphoto

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2002
Professional Status
Retired Appraiser
State
Pennsylvania
Dave,

You've come to the correct conclusion .. school districts (at least in upstate NY) appear to be a more applicable indicator of neighborhoods. My own school district includes 3 counties, and a total of nine munipilaties .. try to define the geographic borders of that area!
 

Jeff Horton

Thread Starter
Senior Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Alabama
[quoteThe market area for the purposes of this report consists of all of northern Door County. ...][/quote]

PERFECT!! Just wondering why I had not thought of this answer? :)
 

MARKETVALUE

Sophomore Member
Joined
Feb 11, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Georgia
Jeff-

we often define the neighborhood as 'xxxxx county' if its outside metro Atlanta and of course if its an accurate assessment. Accurate description and no one else seems to have a problem with it.

MRM
 

Judy Whitehead (Florida)

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 20, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Florida
I do a lot of rural areas and sometimes even use a combination of boundaries - such as Withlacoochee State forest to the east, such and such road to the west, southern county boundary to the south - anyway, you get the picture. Some areas I can certainly believe would be the entire "peninsula" or county, etc.

I think that it helps me define the neighborhood in my own head, so that I don't incorrectly describe something. It also helps me in identifying competing neighborhoods by having describe what the subject neighborhood is (when I have to go over five miles for comps) .
 
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