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Non Contigious Lot

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Ed

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Feb 18, 2002
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Certified Residential Appraiser
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Pennsylvania
I inspected my subject and pulled courthouse records (Deed, tax card, plat map etc...) The borrower told me at the inspection that he owned 1.30 acres, which I noted. When I pulled the Deed and tax records I found that there are two parcels for the subject, however, both on the same Deed. Moreover, they each have their own separate parcel number. One parcel is .36 acre with the house and other improvements. The other parcel is vacant ground containing .94 acre. Having said that, I discovered that an alley (which looked like a driveway at the time of inspection) runs through these parcels making them non-contigious. I told my client what I found and they said "Appraise whats on the Deed".

My issue is value? It would stand to reason that one single 1.30 parcel of ground would be more valuable that a "split" parcel. Trying to find non-contigious lots to determine value would be impossible. Any advice on this issue?
 

fritzvogel

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 16, 2004
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
New York
Man, you have a rough one....I wounder how many others declined that assignment. You could go 4-8 different ways with that ISSUE.
Must be rural or W.VA, Tn, or other interbread areas that even allowed that use/site. Appraise the improvement and you should charge to appraise the excess land.
 

CANative

Elite Member
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Jun 18, 2003
Professional Status
Retired Appraiser
State
California
My issue is value? It would stand to reason that one single 1.30 parcel of ground would be more valuable that a "split" parcel. Trying to find non-contigious lots to determine value would be impossible. Any advice on this issue?

Or it could be that two lots are worth a lot more than one big lot.
 

Ed

Thread Starter
Junior Member
Joined
Feb 18, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Pennsylvania
Not as rural as you would think. Somewhat suburban actually.
 

Ed

Thread Starter
Junior Member
Joined
Feb 18, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Pennsylvania
Courthouse could not determine who owns the alley. They know it's not the borrower that owns the house and lot(s).
 

Mztk1

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Joined
Dec 3, 2006
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Florida
We have similar properties nearby. Where the owner has a lot and then you cross a street, or in some locations several streets, and they own a lot on the lake and/or beach and the lots are taxed separately, have parcel IDs but are tied up on the same deed and title together.

Your situation doesn't sound that hard to me...maybe because I am used to them. It is only a small alley. A good one I had was in a town called Cedar Key where one of the oldest houses in the town, 3 blocks from the beach and barely a view from its balcony, owned a beautiful lot on the beach. You had to walk to get to your other parcel. That was tough. But what you have is almost like having a lot with a deeded road running through. Also, if the town could not find out who owned the alley, there a chance if the owner has been absent for long and the current owner has been using the land, or preventing traffic from passing, that he could claim the land. It might have even been dedicated to the town at some point.

The first thing to me would be zoning. Can you build on the vacant lot and if so, how many times. What are the lot size requirements. Can it be subdivided twice? And if so, is that both lots facing the alley, or back to back. If it is subdividable that alley may be worth quite a bit to have since the owner would have immediate access to build.

Once you know if it is excess or surplus land, then you'll begin to have a basis for pulling your comps.
 

Mike Kennedy

Elite Member
Joined
Sep 28, 2003
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
New York
Few Questions/Thoughts:

Surveys available? "somewhat suburban".......what is the governing municipality? deed descriptions for both lots? Town or Village Building & Zoning Department or does "Courthouse" above refers to County? Is Zoning in effect? which municipal entity governs/monitors it? Identification of "alley" IMO is step one. May find it's actually part of either the primary or secondary parcel.
 

Jim Onderisin

Senior Member
Joined
Sep 15, 2003
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Illinois
I'd want to see surveys for both parcels.
 

David Wimpelberg

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Joined
Mar 30, 2005
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
New York
Problems like this are usually local, and the issues associated with the are often complex.

Here's some situations of noncontiguous lots I've come across:
  • Inland home with deeded noncontiguous, unbuilable lot that provides water access. Lot could be across street, or around the corner and down the street.
  • Old filed maps - Land subdivided prior to zoning. Someone bought several lots, separated by proposed roads. Laws were subsequently passed to handle the never-approved subdivisions. The paper roads may be abandoned to reconnect the lots. There may be all sorts of legal issues and fees associated with this.
  • Property divided by public road. A building lot and substandard lot are created.
Basically, you have to know something about zoning and the history of the parcels to solve many of these appraisal issues. If it's for a lender, it may be possible to speak to the lender's attorney regarding the issue(s).
 
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