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NOT GETTING PAID!!

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Katrina

Thread Starter
Freshman Member
Joined
Feb 3, 2002
I AM AN APPRAISER APPRENTICE. I'VE BEEN WORKING FOR 2 MONTHS AND HAVE BEEN COMPENSATED ONLY $325, ALTHOUGH I HAVE COMPLETED 18 APPRAISALS. THERE IS ALWAYS AN EXCUSE. PAYDAYS ARE THE 15TH & 30TH. THE LATEST WAS "I AM LEAVING FOR VACATION ON THE 12TH SO I WILL PAY YOU BEFORE I LEAVE". WE STOPPED FOR PAYCHECKS THAT DAY AND WERE TOLD BY THE SECRETARY THAT "THE BOSS GOT SO SWAMPED HE TOOK ALL THE PAYROLL STUFF WITH HIM AND WILL OVERNIGHT OUR CHECKS ON SATURDAY THE 13TH". TODAY IS THE 18TH AND NO CHECKS. ALSO, NO RESPONSE TO EMAILS OR MESSAGES. OUR REPORTS ARE COMPLETED IN A TIMELY FASHION AND WE HAVE GONE THE EXTRA MILE FOR NEW CLIENTS ON MANY OCCASSIONS. I WOULD APPRECIATE ANOTHER VIEWPOINT ON THIS.
THANKS. KATRINA
 

Dee Dee

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 16, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Colorado
Sounds like it's time to find a new mentor. Obviously this one doesn't have much respect for the work you have done if he can afford to be taking a vacation without giving you your paycheck. If you weren't doing your job up to his expectations he would have fired you by now, there are plenty of apprentices looking for work out there that he could have replaced you with. Sorry to hear that you aren't being treated fairly. :(

Dee Dee
 

Ross (CO)

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Colorado
Katrina, sorry to hear that your start-up in appraising is revealing one of those harsh realities that so many of us also have likely experienced ..... that being, the "pay" is "nothing to write home about" ! A reader might guess from your comments that you mentor / employer is not someone you have known very long nor very well. Although I had known my mentor for 17 years when I started up, the understanding on my getting paid was that the client had to pay their invoice first, then I got my split. That could easily have meant that I might not see a nickel for 1 or 2 or 3 months after my report was done. It was clear that I would not be paid before that had occurred......and I accepted. We did have a regular practice of contacting and re-invoicing at 60 days, but that was not done by me yet by the office administrator and within the existing routine of his duties, and that was a very diverse range of duties. If your day is still full with on-going assignments for the same "employer" then perhaps you are in a situation requiring a "may I have a few minutes of your time" conversation with the boss. Do you work from their office or do you work from your home ? You may be better served by kindling a second work-source affiliation and hopefully there may be more opportunity for c.o.d. payments with the work performed. We ALL like c.o.d. and you will find that by encouraging c.o.d. payment arrangements you take a LOT of the pressure off the entire process of your efforts. Some mentors do not want to establish that practice however as that is not the way the client has created the payment process since the start of the working relationship, which may well preceed your arrival on the team. Best wishes.
 

George Hatch

Elite Member
Gold Supporting Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2002
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
California
For the record, I have never had a trainee. If I did, I wouldn't treat them this way. Being a slow-pay or a deadbeat is no way to engender long term realtionships or a good reputation. This attitude will cost your boss a lot, sooner or later.

The preceding paragraph was a disclaimer for the balance of this post. I'm normally a very strong advocate for appraiser-power. But that doesn't necessarily extend to trainees who are trying to get into the business. There are a lot of people who would like to have the opportunity you have right now. There are more ways than one to benefit from your current relationship. Maybe you should consider just making the best of it. Only you can decide what is right for you.

The truth is that some fee shop operator/appraisers are not very good business people. The last state newsletter that came out in my state listed at least one appraiser who had been disciplined for not paying their subcontractors. I worked for an appraiser once who paid all their bills and invoices slowly, took their ledger with them on weekends and basically did everything you are describing. It never changed the entire time I worked for him, and I reckon he still does it that way to this day. However, if I had it to do all over, I probably would still have gone to work for him because I did get paid for (almost) every job I ever did for him. He did stiff me for a few jobs he never got paid for, and many times the payment would come 90 or even 120 days after I completed the appraisal. On the plus side, I learned a lot at that shop and benefitted in other ways than immediate income. To this day, I consider the whole experience very worthwhile as a whole.

The one thing I did do was to hook up with another fee shop. That helped a lot because it stabilized my income. When one shop was slow the other one usually picked up the slack. Also, the two shops knew I was doing work on the outside, and they tended to not take me for granted. One of them even offered me a 70% split to get me to 'commit'. I was smart enough to not take it. Having options is a valuable commodity.

It probably won't do a whole lot of good to threaten your boss. It's a small world out there and no trainee needs an enemy. If you can't abide the way things are now, you should probably just move on with a smile on your face. Under no circumstances should you bad mouth them to other appraisers for being a slow-pay or a deadbeat. Besides, their reputation is probably already well known. 18 assignments completed probably means at least 110 hours, so you are that much closer to having your permanent license. Burning bridges might be satisfying on a short term basis, but could come back to bite you later on. As a person who needs the documented hours for licensure, you don't have much leverage right now. Better to pay your dues right now and benefit later.

It's also better to get paid part, or in pieces, rather than take the whole loss. Maybe you can make arrangements that if your boss is strapped for cash that they can pay what they can when they can, with the understanding that you eventually will get your money. Being flexible sometimes can help. Whatever decision you make, live with it. There's no point in being in a position where you feel like you're a doormat. You wanted to get into the business, this is sometimes what the business is like.


George Hatch
 

Mary Caffey

Sophomore Member
Joined
Feb 22, 2002
:) My son would tell you the BEST supervisor is your DAD- we pay our Trainee (son) before we even get paid- I am a real estate broker too and agents and appraisers have families to feed too, so my advice is Find another sponser- in Texas you can have several -

good luck !!
 

Jim Robinson

Freshman Member
Joined
Apr 23, 2002
Why don't you post his e-mail or phone number. We can give him a thousand calls! You sure are patient. 325 for 2 months? He hasn't paid you when around for business; I'd be curious to see if you're paid during a vacation.
 
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