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Siding Issues

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Brent

Thread Starter
Freshman Member
Joined
Apr 11, 2007
Professional Status
Licensed Appraiser
State
Virginia
I searched this topic, but failed to find anything relevant. For an FHA appraisal, one of the conditions I required to be repaired was extensive water damage to the masonite siding. Two of the exterior walls were particularly bad. I could even push my finger into portions of it.

About two weeks later, I was asked to return to the home to verify repairs had been made. I found one of the exterior walls had been covered in vinyl, the remaining siding was still masonite and there was still water damage on another wall.

The home owner called me when he learned I did not complete an update indicating the repairs were made. While explaining it to him, he basically said he planned to repaint the home and that exterior wall that was covered in vinyl was simply done so that I would sign off on the repairs. When I heard that, I repeated it back to him and after a quick stammer, he said he was going to cover the entire house in vinyl.

So now we are two weeks later still and they want me to return. I asked about what they did to repair the damage before going out and they told me the two damaged exterior walls were covered in vinyl.

So I am currently fighting an LO and a home owner over 2 issues. The rotting damaged siding hiding behind the vinyl and a home with partial masonite and partial vinyl siding. Not to mention the statements made by the home owner.

Am I wrong in this?

Thanks in advance for your input!
 

Nancy in Friday Harbor

Junior Member
Joined
Jan 16, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Washington
Brent,

If the siding was so bad you could stick your finger through it, what's the chance that there is no damage behind that siding? Just google "LP siding" and take a look at some of the photos of the rot in the walls behind failed siding. Take a look at the numbers in the HUGE class action suit that resulted. We're talking rot and mold and, in some cases, structural failure.

Unless you have some very, very, very large limits on your E&O insurance, you need to have a qualified professional inspect those walls....and the siding repair. Just covering up the damage with vinyl is not going to make it go away....and there's no way on God's green earth that I would sign my name on the dotted line and say "I certify everything is hunky-dory".

Nancy in Gray & Cloudy Friday Harbor
 

Mountain Man

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2002
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
Georgia
It's going to be hard, but you've got to stand firm. If that were one of my foreclosures, we'd pull off ALL of the Masonite siding, see what damage is done and repair it, then replace the siding with what the market would expect. (Vinyl in my area is not allowed in most S/D's.)
 

Mary Tiernan

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 16, 2003
Professional Status
Retired Appraiser
State
Michigan
Wow, why is vinyl not an allowable exterior finish in your area, M Leggett?
 

Mike Boyd

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 18, 2002
Professional Status
Retired Appraiser
State
California
Brent,

....and there's no way on God's green earth that I would sign my name on the dotted line and say "I certify everything is hunky-dory".

Nancy in Gray & Cloudy Friday Harbor

All you are certifying to is that the failed siding has been covered with vinyl siding. If it is an FHA loan, it is likely a pest report was ordered. They are the experts on what is affected by water damage, termites and/or dry rot.
 

Kevin A. Spellman

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 30, 2003
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Massachusetts
When a home clearly displays vinyl over another exterior finish, I provide a similar statement: I cannot state the finish or the condition beneath the vinyl siding or the aluminum coverage. For properties with older home, most owners have chosen to cover the exterior with maintenance free manufactured products such as vinyl siding and aluminum wrap over the trim. I can only state the exterior finish and not the condition of the covered finish beneath by the vinyl and the aluminum.
 

Howard Klahr

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 4, 2004
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
Florida
Mike Boyd said:
a pest report was ordered. They are the experts on what is affected by water damage, termites and/or dry rot.

Am I understanding you correctly that the extermintor is an expert in water damage and dry rot? While I can appreciate that this might be beyond the expertise of some appraisers, I don't follow the connection to the exterminator being the appropriate choice for these items.
 

Couch Potato

Elite Member
Joined
Mar 15, 2004
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
North Carolina
This thread is a prime example of why it is so important to be careful in crafting any "subject to" language. When ever possible (which is most of the time), make the certification of compliance something that is objective, rather than subjective. An appraiser needs to be in a position of affirming someone qualified made the repair and claimed the repair was adequate.

What exactly did your report say? Did it specify the type of acceptable repair? The type of person to make the repair? If the language is too broad or too specific, problems and disputes will result.
 

Mountain Man

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2002
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
Georgia
Wow, why is vinyl not an allowable exterior finish in your area, M Leggett?

The median price home is 400K, and I guess vinyl is considered a cheap redneck house. Matter of fact, it's county code that brick or stone be used to cover foundation walls. So I use the less expensive glue on type fake stone, looks good and meets the code.
 

Mike Boyd

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 18, 2002
Professional Status
Retired Appraiser
State
California
Am I understanding you correctly that the extermintor is an expert in water damage and dry rot? While I can appreciate that this might be beyond the expertise of some appraisers, I don't follow the connection to the exterminator being the appropriate choice for these items.

Dry rot is a living organism and, along with other organisms such as termites and mold, are the main reason for pest inspectors. Water inflitration can lead to mold. Therefore, part of their job is to detect wet areas, determine the reason they are wet and, in some cases, make those repairs.

Notice that I wrote pest INSPECTORS. Not pest EXTERMINATORS. Sometimes they are one in the same, often, they are not. A contractor that promotes himself to be an exterminator only may not be one that you would call to INSPECT for wood destroying pests and organisms. There are two different licenses in California.
 
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