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Teachnological Disrution V. Job Losses

  • Thread starter Deleted member 134708
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This chart shows humans are scared of something that doesn't actually exist. Technology isn't value destroying jobs but value adding. "The printing press gonna take away our jobs."....Nope. AI gonna take away our jobs...nope.

Person I follow on twitter.

"Never in American history has technology displaced so few and scared so many. See chart: rate of occupational change (job churn) by decade, 1850 to 2015."

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Ps. Love me some non-editing capability of the title. Posted on phone. Fat fingers Magee over here.
 

Terrel L. Shields

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Value to whom? When you only count people who are looking for conventional work, the unemployment numbers look great. The agrarian societies of the 19th century had no unemployment because they either worked or starved...no welfare, no food stamps, no charities to speak of. The chart is a very limited view of change. And the potential of driverless cars by itself would destroy everything from mass transit, taxis, trucking, and what jobs that pay as well await a 55 year old truck driver with a High School education? Their option is to compete with an automated truck as best possible and that would probably mean minimum wage ... or working in the black (cash) market below minimum wage.
 

hastalavista

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Technology has always displaced segments of the workforce. It is the natural evolution of discovery applied to practical application.
Historically, most technological advances have taken time for adoption; as a consequence, historically, the transition has been relatively slow and the population sets have had time to adapt.
In the last 200+/- years or so, the rate of technological advancement has increased significantly. What might have taken several generations to evolve now occur within a single-generation. That is what causes anxiety and disruption; not the technology (the Luddite solution didn't work out so well) but the rate at which it occurs.

Our societal challenge is to identify this realty and take steps to ensure transitions are as smooth as possible. You cannot outlaw progress. You can, however, implement programs to ease the natural-disruptions that progress creates.
In a totalitarian state, the dictator can simply decree that workers in industry X now work in industry Y; however, that never works well (as evidenced in the managed-economies such as the Soviet Union).
We live in a democracy and our fundamental economic-structure is capitalistic. Therefore, we cannot order workers or industries around and stay true to those principles. We certainly can devise retraining programs and create incentives for those industries being displaced to transition to other employment/industries that remain in demand. Not all workers can be retained and transition; that is a reality of life, and there is no perfect solution for that demographic. The best we can do is to try to ensure those who need the retraining have the opportunities to obtain it.

Labor Unions can play an important part in the above (and, as most who read my posts know, I'm not a big fan of unions). Their purpose is to protect their membership's employment status and try to get the best benefit program they can for their members from the employer. Labor Unions are in a unique position to advocate for retraining of their members with some moral authority and can partner with industry and government to see it happen. Of course, recognizing that one's industry is going to be outdated in some relatively short time (15-30 years, or about one generation, let's say) requires the union to recognize their remaining useful and economic life in regard to the outdated industry is about the same. Recognizing the fact (as an organization or individual) that the demand for what one produces "now" is going to significantly diminish (and maybe disappear) in the future is not always that easy. :cool:
 

gregb

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The future is already here, its just not evenly or widely distributed.
 

Randolph Kinney

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The value of social media is, it consumes time but it is not productive. It sells smart phones and tablets so at any time, any where, you can waste time. Great boon to advertisers.
 
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