• Welcome to AppraisersForum.com, the premier online  community for the discussion of real estate appraisal. Register a free account to be able to post and unlock additional forums and features.

Test Pass Rates

Status
Not open for further replies.

Ken Youngkrantz

Thread Starter
Junior Member
Joined
Dec 2, 2003
Professional Status
Licensed Appraiser
State
California
The following figures were released yesterday by Bob Clark the new head of OREA

He stated the stats on Testing pass rates due to the increased
> difficulty on the 2008 tests.
>
> 2008 first time pass rate
>
> AT - 19.56%
>
> AL – 21.74%
>
> AR – 36.10%
>
> AG – 61.39%
>
> Overall – 32.69% pass rate on first time
>
> 2008 2nd time pass rates
>
> AT – 12.5%
>
> AL - 20%
>
> AR – 25.75%
>
> AG – 22.85%
>
> Overall – 20.15% pass rate on 2nd time.
>
> Overall – 28.056% pass rate.

Ken
 

Michigan CG

Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Nov 1, 2006
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
Michigan
Just like the stats from Michigan, it shows the hardest test is the most passed test. Appears there is something seriously wrong with the training process for residential appraisers.
 

Lloyd Bonafide

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2006
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
California
The pass rates seem really low. Does anybody know how these rates compare to 2, 5, 10 years ago, etc.?
 

Metamorphic

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 15, 2008
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
California
The OREA needs to seriously consider the legality of their testing if the rate is that low.

The test for Professional Geologist registration used to be brutally difficult. It was only offered twice a year at 2 locations in the state. It was a grueling day long test, and all the guy's that got granfathered as RG's and made it on the board had made it exceedingly difficult to pass. It actually had a lot of non- standardized elements (drawing maps, making subjective interpretations of geology, etc). The pass rate was typically in the 10-15% range. I knew guys who took the test half a dozen times. Smart geologists that studied for months before each exam , did the prep classess over and over that couldent pass.

The board ended up getting sued. The test was found to be an illegal barrier to competetion. They ended up with a test more in line with national standards that had fewer subjective elements, and had a pass rate in the 40% range last time I paid attention. I know from an appraisers perspective that seems a little slack. But to even get permission to take the test you have to have 5 years of documented experience working under an RG, plus a Geology or related bachelors degree.
 

PLCG

Member
Joined
Jul 12, 2006
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
Pennsylvania
What can I say - no food, no water, half hour break for lunch, accompanied bathroom break - test is 8 hours long. Maybe they just pass out before they finish. I can't wait!
 

ALEXLIU

Freshman Member
Joined
Feb 2, 2005
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
California
study!study!study!
 

ZZGAMAZZ

Elite Member
Joined
Jul 23, 2007
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
California
response to Post# 4:

New egalitarian standard: "No appraiser left behind."
 

Metamorphic

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 15, 2008
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
California
response to Post# 4:

New egalitarian standard: "No appraiser left behind."

My understanding of legal basis of these kinds of professional entry tests is that they have to show some reasonable nexus between a person's ability to pass the test and a reasonable protective benefit to the people of the state. In other words, when making the test harder does not result in some tangible benefit to the people of the state, making the test harder is an unlawful barrier. Making it harder because you think fewer people should pass is unlawful; licensing cant be a tool to grand the people already licensed a monopoly or maintain their business advantage.

I think most of us would agree that being a good appraiser is about 98% what you learn as a trainee; all the test really tests is your ability to regurgitate some USPAP (that you already regurgitated for the USPAP test) and some real estate/appraiser lingo. MHO, but unless OREA is willing to step up and make a truly practical, and relevent test (perhaps something with a test house to appraise), there's really no reason to make the test anything more than a prefuctory check that you understand the basics of USPAP and basic appraiser training.
 

ZZGAMAZZ

Elite Member
Joined
Jul 23, 2007
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
California
This probably has less than anything to do with this issue, but I remember the debate in Louisiana 20 years ago when the state implemented a moratorium on new hospitals--seems that some of the legislators had controlling interests in existing facilities and just downright hated to see any more competition.

I often wondered during the past year or two why California wouldn't consider a moratorium on new appraisers--when there was little if any need for more practitioners.
 

nex2beach

Freshman Member
Joined
Aug 26, 2008
Professional Status
Appraiser Trainee
State
California
Regarding the "new" appraisal exams, it appears from the results that the Appraisal Institute (the good ole boys who were grandfathered in) had a hand in formulating these exams. It now seems that, in order to pass any of the exams, you would fare better if you take all of the Appraisal Institute's classes prior to taking any of the tests. That way, you will at least have a chance to see the questions and answers beforehand.​

Several thoughts to consider... (1) just imagine the revenue generated by the need to take these classes in order to be prepared for these exams and (2) did you know that the pass rate for the California State Bar Exam for Attorneys is between 35% to 40% whereas the pass rate for the Appraiser Exams is between 20% to 30%. Does any of this make any sense?

Regarding sense... the more members an industry has, the more strength it has to dictate its health and welfare. Considering this, exclusion from the appraisal industry by difficult and unrelated testing is not the answer. :nono:
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Find a Real Estate Appraiser - Enter Zip Code

Copyright © 2000-, AppraisersForum.com, All Rights Reserved
AppraisersForum.com is proudly hosted by the folks at
AppraiserSites.com
Top

AdBlock Detected

We get it, advertisements are annoying!

Sure, ad-blocking software does a great job at blocking ads, but it also blocks useful features of our website. For the best site experience please disable your AdBlocker.

I've Disabled AdBlock
No Thanks