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The Order Of Things

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Kyle Turk

Freshman Member
Joined
Jun 23, 2003
I'd like some input on what steps I should take from my current position. I'm currently working at a small but busy appraisal office as a reviewer. I'm the first to examine and edit the field appraisal, then an experienced appraiser fine tunes it, then the supervisor polishes and signs it. The pay's not great ($10/hr.), but the knowledge is great. I'm also just starting the Allied program online.
What steps should I take to move into the field a few days/week under a mentor, when should this happen, and is this normal sequence of things?
Is this "grunt" work the right way to enter the profession or should I be looking for a full-time mentorship in the field?
Thanx, Happy Independence Day (belated)
 

Mike Garrett RAA

Elite Member
Gold Supporting Member
Joined
Jan 14, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Colorado
What is your license level and experience? Sounds a little weird to me but I need more information in order to give any advice.
 

Ross (CO)

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Colorado
Kyle, .....Sounds like the appraiser who actually did the field work, the inspecting, the driving, the looking, the picture taking ...is actually the 4th person in the protocol of creating the final report. QC is good, but your office's process has 4 layers of it. Do levels 2, 3 and 4 each have the opportunity to fine-tune, change and amend as each one sees fit along the way....any item of fact or text which may not be optimal in that field or addendum paragraph in the report ? Does the original appraiser get shown and have explained each possible change along the way, before the final version is printed up and sent out (or e-mailed) ? Do you and Level 3 get credited for your participation within the addendum of the report (if you actually may have made changes) ? Does the one who "polishes" the report ever go out in the field with the front-line appraiser ? What license does the field appraiser have ? Who is signing the report and how are those respective inspection "boxes" checked ? Does the supervisor then take any and all calls from any client if questions come up after submitting ? Sounds like you are ready for some field visits, ask for them, and accompany #3 or #4 when they go out on-the-road. Best wishes.
 

Kyle Turk

Freshman Member
Joined
Jun 23, 2003
To respond to Mike, I have two weeks of experience in the field of appraisal. I have enrolled in correspondence schooling to reach the first plateau. I have zero field experience.

To respond to Ross...Comps are pulled and some preliminary research is done in the office (#1), the field work is done and an appraisal is assembled (#2), I pull the file, confirm addresses, fill dates, basically do all but assign value. I help to pick up the slack on the field work and present the next guy (#3) an appraisal which only needs value assigned and methods verified. Then he submits to the supervisor, who finalizes value and thoroughly rechecks everything before signing. The supervisor never inspects and the appropriate boxes are marked, and all calls are fielded professionally by the supervisor. Most are just eager for the appraisal. I've only been there a few weeks, but the quality of the final product seems very important to everyone. Value is a topic of great importance, and the supervisors anticipate the changes in the demand for our services by offering a quality product to quality clients.

I believe I'll be ready for field work once I've completed the licensing process. But....that was part of my original question. What is the sequence? My plan is to work and learn in the office while becoming licensed. Then ask to move to the field at least part of the time to learn that aspect and gain hours, then find my niche. Does this sound correct, or should I be in the field now?
 

Gary Leduc

Junior Member
Joined
Jul 23, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Georgia
Heck, I am a registered appraiser, have been since my schooling
last September, and have not averaged $10 per hour for all the work
that I have been doing.
 

Carnivore

Elite Member
Supporting Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
North Carolina
Here I am back from my vacation thinking I could start fresh with a clear mind until I started reading this thread. Now I am even more confused.

Can any explain to me how a three hundred dollar fee can adequately compensate 4 layers, let alone produce a profit for the company?
 

Walter Kirk

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 24, 2003
Professional Status
Licensed Appraiser
State
New Jersey
Kyle,
The process used in your office is complicated to say the least. The answer to your question about the right way to become an appraiser depends on your overall real estate experience. Have you worked in real estate sales?, construction? finance? As to your taking a correspondence course I would advise against it. There are plenty of good appraisers and good courses avaliable in the San Diego area, Get into a classroom with an instructor and other students who know your market area.
 

Kyle Turk

Freshman Member
Joined
Jun 23, 2003
Yeah, I'd prefer the classroom for the structure, but I can't see paying again unless I fail the exam or feel underqualified after the course.

I guess I'm specifically asking...... I'm in. I can ask to be in the field or stay in the office. I'd prefer the field, but don't want to jeopardize my current position if this is an improper question of me to ask. What should I do?
 

Kyle Turk

Freshman Member
Joined
Jun 23, 2003
Andrew-
Sorry to clutter your vacationed mind.... My best analysis is 40% split to the field, all office is hourly, high volume.... Roughly 20 signed @ $300/day = $6k. Less 40% ($2,400), less +/-$1,000/day payroll, less overhead... Maybe a couple bucks to spare at the end of the day. I haven't asked, I'm the newbie... :blink:
 

Carnivore

Elite Member
Supporting Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
North Carolina
Kyle,

In my state trainees are required to have contributed 75% of the work involved leading up to an appraisal report for credit twoards licensing.

If your state is similar how do you manage this aspect so as to get proper credit for licensure rquirements?

Also, do you all rotate duties? If not, how do you advance/develope in training?

lastly, How does this supervisor("superviosr") solve the inevitable problems that arise in normal appraisal work.

FTR: I am not a newby, I have over 13 years experience in residential appraisal work.
 
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