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Three stall Shared garage and drive with house to the east.

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Ray Miller

Elite Member
Joined
Feb 20, 2002
Professional Status
Licensed Appraiser
State
Wisconsin
Have an appraisal that is an older home built in the 30's. Four square two story. The thing I find that is different; it has a shared common drive with the house to the east and a Three Stall detatch garage. Of which one stall is owned by the house to the east. This house owns the other two. It also has a shared shop to the rear of the garage. Garage is as old as the house and is of wood frame. :roll:

How do I go about finding comps of which, I have found none? How do I place a value on the grage? :?
 

George Hatch

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Jan 15, 2002
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
California
Either there was a lot split somewhere in the subject property's history, or the two neighbors were best buddies. In terms of comps, just do what you can do. There most likely aren't any "shared garage" comps. As with the common driveway easement, the shared garage may involve issues regarding maintenance and encroachments. There may also be an issue with the zoning authority's setback requirements. It may be appropriate to recommend a survey. You kow how little things between neighbors can develop into blood feuds later on down the line; you wouldn't want to get caught up in the middle of one of those.

All these conditions mean, if any of them even exist, is that you'll have a legal non-conforming use in that the setback requirements and any encroachments are in violation of local zoning ordinances and/or ownership interests. No big deal, but you will need to find out the legal status of these conditions, how the maintenance is handled, and note them in your report. If you're doing this for a loan, the lender will most likely have to figure out how to insure the garage portion of the improvements. That isn't your problem, but you do need to answer those questions up front so they will have enough info to make the decision.

As for valuing the garage, you are measuring utility so whatever adjustments you would normally make for 1 space vs. 2 spaces is probably a good place to start. If this is a sale, a little chat with the RE broker would be in order.

Take your best shot, develop your opinion and express yourself. It's all downhill from there.

George Hatch
 

Ted Martin

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 17, 2002
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
Kansas
Finding comps is probably going to be impossible, at least in my market it would be. Where are the lot lines, are there any recorded easements, what happens if the garage/shop is damaged or destroyed, how is it insured, would the local building or zoning people let it be replaced?
 

Farm Gal

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 14, 2002
Professional Status
Licensed Appraiser
State
Nebraska
:lol: :lol:
Welcome to the wonderful world of appraising!

Ray, first of let me say, you are NOT limited for this type of question to the newbie section, posting this in Urgent is QUITE legitimate, as this is the sort of thing that 'gets' even seasoned appraisers!~

Now have you been provided with any documentation indicating actual ownership of the 'stall', maintainance agreements for the structure and/or the shared drive?

Without any more than word of mouth, you cannot define exactly WHAT you are going to attempt to appraise!

Frankly you have a odd-ball deal here, for your comfort I will state that if you have NO comps - NO MATTER HOW OLD, no one is going to be able to throw big rocks at what ever you come up with... 8) I would first do a great deal of research to see if ANYONE ANYWHERE had a similar situation even if it is so old as to have a beard.

Then your best bet is to determine the value of whatever you actually have - keeping in mind that determining the cost to repair/maintain and make sure that the legal description is complete and accurate is best done by others!!!

The utility and use of the outbuilding is probably slightly diminished over total ownership of a freestanding structure, but if after looking to the market you can find NO actual basis for comparison, talk to realtors and ask thier OPINION, ask the county appriaser what THEY did with it and why and then form an opinion!

Party wall agreements are more common to residential or commercial structures than outbuildings, shared drives are not uncommon in my area, but that is quite a combination!

Oh and lastly but most important, put on your thickest coat of skin before you talk to the client: YOU are going to be the designated troublemaker in this deal.... hold your ground, insist on documentation, and don't give in!

(says the gal who recently forced a documented party agreement and 'held up the deal for TWO WHOLE WEEKS' :evil: when three other appraisers had written reports on the property in the last two years :roll: )

The client was grateful - eventually - :wink:
 

Restrain

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 22, 2002
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
Florida
Consider this: If Neighbor A gets mad at Neighbor B, he can build a fence right down the middle of the driveway. Now think. What would happen to the subject if that happened? Would he have to add to the driveway? Can he still use the drive and covered parking? If it really doesn't affect things, then there's minimal effect. Otherwise, it can be a loss in that adequate drives and parking would have to be replaced.

Good luck, Roger.
 

Terry Russell

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 24, 2002
Professional Status
Appraiser Trainee
State
Montana
If the driveway has been used by both parcels for a reasonable time and from your description it sounds like it has been, then it is a prescribed easement and it does not matter which parcel it is on, access can not be denied.

The garage however may fall into a condininium (dang) issue or like someone said, they have just been using it for years.
It is no doubt nonconforming and confusing.

I think if you had the property lines established, a lawyer would drive up before the surveyor had the stakes driven. Try to do it without a survey, but it may not be possible

Terry
 

Mike Garrett RAA

Elite Member
Gold Supporting Member
Joined
Jan 14, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Colorado
I am really interested in this thread...would you believe I may have the exact same situation on a foreclosed property here. Lets keep in touch!
 
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