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"to GLA Or Not GLA?"

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ExplainDNA

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 30, 2008
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Illinois
Hi there,

I'll lay it out, then ask, then run for cover:

We have a very nice home in Wonder Lake (Northern Illinois), a fine gut rehab, top to bottom. The home is a Cape COD, with a walk out lower level (also finely rehabbed). The walk out is in the front of the home, as this home is across the street from the actual Wonder Lake (across, not on), but there are splendid views, nonetheless.

Here's thing - the 2nd floor, imagine a typical Cape COD floor plan, angled walls and so forth, this floor has no heating/cooling ventilation. It depends on rising heat, which given what they did inside the home it will receive (there are 'air cavities' to accommodate rising heat). But there are no vents. There is some kind of 'portable' AC unit on the this floor. They did a bang up job on this 2nd floor, two, it's gorgeous.

The 1st floor has typical HVAC.

So, what sayeth my peers, friends and enemies? The market will take these rooms up there, and live, just like any other home. But it's not heated or cooled via the typical HVAC scenario.

How would you describe this and apply it in your report? House is under contract, and it's even at the high end of the market, too boot.

Thanks in advance,

Dave...
 

Tom Woolford

Elite Member
Joined
Nov 20, 2005
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Florida
Angled ceilings: do they meet ANSI standards? Is the passive heating sufficient, or will it have to be supplemented. Those questions have to be clarified. There is obviously market acceptance for the house, but you may have to talk your way into convincing TPTB that its GLA. I feel a lengthy addenda coming, and a request for two similar comps (dated and over 1 mile OK).
 

BRCJR

Elite Member
Gold Supporting Member
Joined
Sep 20, 2005
Professional Status
Licensed Appraiser
State
Virginia
Could it be considered passive heating? Is there any evidence the room temperature in the 2nd level does not reach or maintain an acceptable degree?
 

Vermonter

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 21, 2007
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Vermont
A lot of the capes and older homes around here do not have second floor heat. Don't see it too much in anything built after the 80s or so, but in older homes it's very common and acceptable in this market. I always address it in the report and note the acceptance in the market.

Lake homes are a different market. I know many don't have heat at all or it was retrofitted later. That would depend on your market.

Honestly, if the upstairs temp is an issue those thru vents from the first floor work surprisingly well. Seen them in everything from massive Victorians to small capes (including the one I live in).
 

Mr Rex

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 12, 2004
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
North Carolina
What does the market think? What would it cost to install a mini split hvac system in the area without permanent HVAC installed. The mini splits have come down in price as popularity has grown. Around here they do a Cape COD or a BOG using the first floor HVAC unit and it never works effectively in the hot summer months so in the past there would be ugly window unit(s). Now they add a mini split heat pump that rarely comes on in the winter but makes it fully habitable in the summer.
 

Digger88

Elite Member
Joined
May 11, 2010
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Virginia
whenever i inspect a cape with no heat/ac in the upper level and only minimum amount of finish its usually a blast furnace up there and unlivable. hard to believe they would 'gut' a house and not go the extra 12 inches and put some ducting in.
 

Tom4value

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 4, 2016
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Massachusetts
It will not go FHA but if conventional loan, is adequate heating in cold and market accepted, it is GLA. Just explain as I did.
Common in my market, by the way.
 

residentialguy

Elite Member
Joined
Mar 24, 2009
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Minnesota
Could it be considered passive heating? Is there any evidence the room temperature in the 2nd level does not reach or maintain an acceptable degree?
Agree. Like an A Frame home...upper level often does not need heat. Sounds like it matches the main level in quality. I vote GLA (areas with at least 5'6" or higher ceiling height)
 

ExplainDNA

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 30, 2008
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Illinois
We followed Vermonter's lead here, and feel good about it. We also made the EA that the "passive heating" (and cooling) would be sufficient, as well, just to cover our heinies.

Thank you all very much for your input!

Best,

Dave...
 
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