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Tri Level Question

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Laszlo

Thread Starter
Sophomore Member
Joined
Aug 7, 2006
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Michigan
Does any now the EXACT definition of a Tri Level style home...and where i can verify this information. I have searched all my books and online, and still can't locate a definition or consistant discription.

Thanks for any help!!!
 

Metamorphic

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 15, 2008
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
California
Put "Tri level house" into google, click search, then click on the images tab.
 

Laszlo

Thread Starter
Sophomore Member
Joined
Aug 7, 2006
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Michigan
Thanks. I know what it is, i'm looking for a spicific definition. Anyone know?
 

Edward OConor

Member
Joined
Apr 27, 2006
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
New York
I would think that the definition would vary from region. There was a recent discussion in New York group about the definition of a Hi Ranch vs. a Raised Ranch. The condenses was that what consumers would call a Hi Ranch on Long Island would be considered to be a Raised Ranch up state. On long Island I believe that the design would be called a Split Level and here the family room located behind the garage could/might be counted a GLA.
 

Mike Boyd

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 18, 2002
Professional Status
Retired Appraiser
State
California
Tri-level = 3 levels of above grade living area. No source, just common sense.
 

Thomas Fiehler

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 2, 2003
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
Ohio
Mike-I would suggest that it is 3 levels of living area. Around here, the lower level on 99.99% are below grade but still called a tri level.
 

Mike Boyd

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 18, 2002
Professional Status
Retired Appraiser
State
California
Mike-I would suggest that it is 3 levels of living area. Around here, the lower level on 99.99% are below grade but still called a tri level.

You are probably right about your specific market area. In my area we would call your example 2 levels with a finished daylight basement.
 

Laszlo

Thread Starter
Sophomore Member
Joined
Aug 7, 2006
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Michigan
Located in Michigan, FHA appraisal, standard tri-level(I understand Tri = 3). I always consider a tri level three levels w/no basement. My issue is; The lower level is only partially finished (really old and dingy..like a basement) with a half bath (only studs and open ceiling). If a tri level is three levels which includes all sqft, this would indicate that the house is actually unfinished. Right? But, if the main bathroom, bedrooms, living room, and kitchen are all located on the main and upper levels (that are finished) could i consider the lower level a "basement" and exclude sqft? If i do that, is it any different than appraising a 1 story house and excluding an unfinished living room and lav?

Obviously i want to do what's right and not misrepresent anything. Therefore, the question is...is the lower level called a basement or a lower level? Is the house unfinished...or does it have an unfinished basement?

Any thoughts??
 

Laszlo

Thread Starter
Sophomore Member
Joined
Aug 7, 2006
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Michigan
Any opinions?? :shrug:
 

Tim Schneider

Member
Joined
Feb 8, 2007
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Wisconsin
A tri-level is a style and does not mean that there are 3 finished levels.
 
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