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What Constitutes An Inspection?

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Terrel L. Shields

Elite Member
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Joined
May 2, 2002
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
Arkansas
When you certify that you inspected the interior of a property, does that infer that you inspected the interior of each and every building? Like that storage shed, well house, shop, horse stall, etc. Or, do you think only the major buildings are deemed important? Have you ever been asked to do an inspection and no problem with home, but "John's shop" is locked and we have things in there we would as soon you not see? Or, that little shed a hundred yards from the back door is where the bull stays and it is full of bull as well as bull products.

I gladly avoid such buildings as long as I have a good idea of what they are.

Further, on large commercial poultry farms, for instance, an interior inspection is about a 6 hour process. First, you drive to company headquarters where your truck wheelwells are disinfected. While they are doing that, you will go into their showers from one side, shower, go out the other side to a fresh change of clothes (their overalls), disposable boots or disinfected boots, drive to the farm and go into the change hut there have your boots disinfected again. THEN, when you are done inspecting, you go back to the change hut and SHOWER out, go back to the Headquarters and have your vehicle disinfected again while you change back into your own clothes. Contamination of a farm is a financial crisis for a grandparent breeder operation. You could cause $1,000,000 worth of chickens to be killed. See if your E & O covers that!

Further, do you still sign the fannie mae certification that you inspected the interior of a building when it is proposed construction? What should you certify for new construction?
 
Joined
Jan 28, 2003
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
North Carolina
What constitutes an inspection?

That is a great question. I wish USPAP would address this, but that is not at the top of my list of issues with USPAP.
 

liznindy

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2002
Professional Status
Certified Residential Appraiser
State
Indiana
Terrel,

I would use the scope of the assigment to address the extent of my "inspection". I hate that word as I am not an Inspector. I prefer "viewed the interior of the subject residence" .


Thank God, I only do residential so I can avoid all the chicken s%^$%t!
 

Restrain

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 22, 2002
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
Florida
Depends.

I wouldn't inspect the interior of a broiler house. Too hazardous. At the same time, I wouldn't necessarily do a complete inspection of all buildings of a petrochemical refinery. Same reason. I would simply explain the situation and go forward.

On a residence, yes, I look at every shed, etc. Never know what you'll find there. Besides, I don't expect any unusual hazardous problems...and if there are, I need to report it.

Roger
 

Terrel L. Shields

Elite Member
Gold Supporting Member
Joined
May 2, 2002
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
Arkansas
I know of a fellow who found a meth lab behind a false wall in a garage. It was not that well hidden. The owner was nearly 60 years old.

I don't consider poultry houses particularly hazardous, but then again I was a grower once upon a time myself. It is not the cleanest work you have ever done. The pooh is not as bad as the ammonia and H2S odors. Some caged layer operations can be pretty hazardous though.

I go into dairy parlors and I go into most barns depending upon how significant the building is. I don't find anything intriguing about a prefab storage shed. You seen one, you seen 'em all.

My inspection text goes something like this.

The appraisal "inspection" is a value inspection and is no substitute for an engineering inspection. While the appraiser neither sees nor has been told of any obvious defect not otherwise reported, appraisers are not experts in identification of such items and the appraiser recommends the property have an inspection by a certified home or property inspector and a structural engineer.
 

Mountain Man

Elite Member
Joined
Jan 15, 2002
Professional Status
Certified General Appraiser
State
Georgia
I gladly avoid such buildings as long as I have a good idea of what they are.

Ditto. I'm there to get an idea of what it's worth, and how a buyer would react. There are several things on the old Fannie/Freddie forms that I wish would change. I don't use the same terminology in narratives, changed those a while back. I don't inspect, I observe. I don't estimate value, I give an opinion....... etc.
 
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